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LeMa88

LeMa88 BSN, MSN, RN

Ortho, Med/Surg, ED, CCU- Agency
New New Nurse
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LeMa88 has 12 years experience as a BSN, MSN, RN and specializes in Ortho, Med/Surg, ED, CCU- Agency.

LeMa88's Latest Activity

  1. LeMa88

    Afraid of dying

    *hug I work in the ICU now but my experience is 12years and going in other acute areas- This is the first time I get panic/anxiety attack prior to going to work. All the response that you would normally get from an attack like nausea, upset stomach, palpitation, cold hand and difficulty catching my breath. It was bizarre but the positive thing is, as soon as I walk into the ICU unit, see my fellow nurses, we all gear up with our goggle, gown and mask- that made me feel at ease that we are all in this together - we spot each other to ensure we are all safe. When I finish the 12hours shift, I go home after a long scrub down at work- Next shift, everything starts again, the upset stomach, palpitation, cold hand..etc.. You are definitely not alone- I keep saying I need to stop working too much and spend more time with the family, kids- but seeing how short staff my unit is, with some staffs already off sick, with the overflow of ICU patents onto other units, we need more hands on as ever. It feels great to be a part of it during this pandemic -
  2. LeMa88

    Feeling terrible about mistake

    I'd like to share to, my ADHF patient, came in, severely fluid overloaded. Cardiologist saw her, prescribed Lasix infusion at 5mg/hr. The ampoules are 250mg in 25mls so I have that in a 30mls syginge. Checked, went to set it up, rechecked, programmed the infusion as 250mg in 250mls so the patient was having 50mg/hr instead of 5mg. A few hours lately, attended to her hygiene, the pump started alarming. I looked, saw the syringe was almost empty, thought to myself " oh that was quick "- proceed to the drug room to make up another one.. then I stopped, I realised what happened, my heart dropped to my stomach, I broke down in cold sweat, I cannot believe what I had done. I went to check on the pt, turned off the pump, went to the I/C, told her what I had done. She said "is the patient OK?" "yes" "did you turn the pump off?" "yes" "take some blood to check her UEC and electrolytes"... I also rang the registrar to let him know, all he said was "ah well, maybe she needed that" I was beside myself
  3. LeMa88

    Perfect Timing: Brand New ICU RN During Pandemic

    I have just started ICU, this is the 3rd month, I am still overwhelmed despite having years of experience in other area. I feel stupid and incompetent most days. Looking forward to hear other answers too before I lose my mind
  4. This is how I have been feeling going from CCU to ICU, even though they are both considered crit care but the two have totally different patient populations. I definitely feel out of depth, way out of my element here- which is a shame because I really looked forward to this new experience. My preceptor and I never work together in the same shift, so I find comfort in some of the other senior nurses, hang on to them like floaties, ask them questions even just a little debrief in the corridor like "hi how are you doing? Have you settled in OK? " My answers have been "I have good days and bad days, today is particularly difficult" then they would pull me aside to just have a chat. But I have trust in these nurses. Only issue, they don't work often enough. And I find myself checking the roster in advance to see who I am going to be working with.
  5. I don't know how to start with this post, before I begin I'd like to have a full disclosure I am a stubborn person, ambitious, inquisitive and I don't settle for not knowing. At work, I don't get into the politics of it all because my goal is to learn everything there is to learn, not to aim for the highest position there is out there. I am generally a happy easy going workmate, more than happy to help out. Been doing this for 12years +, from acute, subacute, community, did bit of aged care, went into critical care and I have recently started in ICU. In my mind, its a hard area hence why I want to conquer it. I want to learn and thrive..~~ Lately, I have anxiety ++ going to work, I have nightmares that I fall asleep at work and patients die. I am tiptoeing and second guessing myself with every clinical decision no matter how solid. The people I work with, 15% are nice, kind and humble. The rest are egoistic, harsh, love to criticise and love to see fresh face crash and burn. I enjoy the learning aspect but I don't enjoy being made to feel this way. I have 2 little kids at home and this is taking a toll on family life. I am so stressed, so burned out that I don't enjoy thing else anymore. May I add, its a bad habit but I smoke( going from 1cig once a blue moon to a pack every 2 weeks), I drink more Is this the point that someone would consider a change of career or do I need to grow a pair and adapt to this crude workplace culture. I have heard of people sharing their stories and they all begin with "it was a bold choice" and ends with "I have not looked back and I have never been happier"..I envy those, how do I get there? I want to achieve the level of happiness and contentment at work. I don't go to work to be anxious and stressed !
  6. LeMa88

    Why did you choose to be an ICU Nurse?

    I have been nursing for a while, every couple of years I moved onto another specialty to explore my options and find my calling. I started out in Inpatient Pall care then Med/Surg, then transitioned to community/subacute for a bit then came back, tried Emergency, Cathlab then CCU looking after patient post MIs, arrthymia, heart failures..etc.. I liked them all, but never fully satisfied because I thought there could be more, I didn't like not knowing. So I thought, what would be the hardest, the most "elite" area of nursing. Thats right, Intensive Care. So I did, there are bad days there are good days, but the satisfaction that comes from being able to care for the sickest of sick, is second to none.
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