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Flylik3abr1

Flylik3abr1

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Flylik3abr1's Latest Activity

  1. Flylik3abr1

    Failed Nur 114

    I should have seen this coming. I have never been the best student and I have recently been diagnosed with ADD. I have been getting by making the bare minimum in my nursing classes, and honestly, it's a miracle I made it this far. I always got raving responses from any practical applications of knowledge but I am utter trash when it comes to the lecture portion of nursing. I could probably recite anything to do with any type of shock, hypersensitivity reaction, psychological disorders, etc. as well as treatments and nursing interventions but for some reason sitting down and taking tests I always end up choosing the second most correct answer and it has finally gotten me my first failure. I have a Pre Nursing GPA of a 2.8 (not great I know) and will be applying for remediation and hopefully, I can get in and get back on track in the spring. I believe my school evaluates your pre-nursing GPA otherwise no one would really be able to remediate unless they were straight-A students. If not then...well. I don't know what I will do. I was wondering if anyone else has failed and came back stronger and if there are any tips anyone has discovered that works for them in the test-taking area.
  2. Flylik3abr1

    ICU vs Medsurg

    I am an ASN student going into my third semester of nursing school and have just recently gotten a couple of job offers at a local hospital for work as a Patient Care Technician. One is for a PRN position as a Medsurg tech and the other is a full-time days position in the ICU. Scheduling aside I am leaning more towards the ICU position because I think it will solidify whether I truly want to work in the intensive care side of nursing. I have seen first hand what the techs do on Medsurg but I have yet to really get much ICU experience aside from what I have been informed of what the RN's do on the unit. I am curious to know from the experience of some techs here the key differences on the units for Techs and which you all prefer. Any and all advice/feedback is appreciated. Thank you.
  3. Flylik3abr1

    ICU approach vs Floor nurse

    Well, I am in a training program in Alabama and as far as I can see we as students can essentially perform any skill that an RN is capable of doing so long as there is supervision and someone to claim responsibility for the students aka the Clinical Instructor. Yes, she does work at the facility we were learning at. Our instructor does things in a very specific way. Rather than being a point of reference for the educational aspect of the clinical experience she essentially comes to the floor as a floater nurse and each of her patients are assigned a student. This way we are "supposed" to get more information from our patients due to the one on one approach but realistically we tend to get bored since not every patient is near death. So whenever a patient needs an IV or any other types of procedural order done a student is allowed to volunteer to attempt the skill but inevitably she is the one who has to do things. And I need to rephrase the IV complaint from earlier because yes I can see how two sticks can be different from another facility but she will essentially fish for the vein before even locating a good spot to start from like how we are taught to in school. The way I see it yes you have to do what you have to do but prodding an arm repeatedly with the same needle and creating several tiny wounds near a vein seems like a quick way to get sepsis which is why I have a huge problem with that. Also, the complaint with the blood products was: as I entered the CVICU to tour the facility I witnessed a nurse take all of the leftover blood products from the transfusion (bag with a small amount of blood in it, tubing, towels, etc.) and threw them straight in the trash. No thought about it she just chucked it straight in the garbage like that's where it goes.
  4. Flylik3abr1

    Got in, and failed 😔😔

    Oh I don't mean for you to misunderstand. This is definitely a field that I am passionate about. I may have originally posted my comment on one of my more broken days, but I didn't choose nursing for anyone but myself. I say "go back to computer science school" because that was probably the only other field I had looked into that I had a passion for. I really wanted to get into nursing informatics but I'll be honest there are days when I feel like it will be impossible for me just to become a floor nurse. And everyone has those days. I don't have any grandiose disillusioned ideas of what nursing entails. I just think the academic portion of nursing is some times purposefully impossible to succeed in. And I am back on my feet trying to make it to the finish line but I am still looking out for a stray rock to throw me off my game.
  5. Flylik3abr1

    Got in, and failed 😔😔

    Im sorry to hear that. Sadly im in a similar situation. I feel like all of this is too good to be true. I have support from my classmates but honestly, I didn't have the best grades and somehow got in through the cracks. My study habits have gotten better and some straight A students are now making C's like me. But still. I have this little seed of doubt that is keeping me from becoming too comfortable. Ive been in school for 8 years now and I feel like maybe I have finally reached my breaking point. I have left different majors for different reasons and I am trying my best not to back out of this one since I have made it so far. But I am currently hanging on by a thread and I have already kind of accepted my fate instead of feeling panic. If I don't make it this semester I will either try to join the military or go back to computer science school. I just worry I will disappoint my family but it is what it is.
  6. Flylik3abr1

    Is this nursing?

    Be careful getting into CNA work as a student nurse. Not to talk poorly about CNA work, it is very important, but be careful with certain hospitals, nursing homes, and health agencies. They will work you to near death even as a student. Say what you want about nurses but you really truly need to have a heart for caring for others if you want to be a CNA and work through nursing school and not lose your mind.
  7. Flylik3abr1

    Grades when you were in Nursing School

    I won't say much for the first part of your response since I already stated in my first post that it mainly is boiled down to the RN population in your area and what type of position you are applying for as a new grad. However I will say that living near one of the best hospitals in the country (UAB medicine) and knowing people within their graduate school programs, I am not implying that they are not hard to get into. Sure maintaining a good grade point average is a benefit to ones prospects of entering an advanced degree program but to put more pressure than neccessary on someone to achieve something that for most is impossible is irresponsible. You say that you applied to John Hopkins medicine within a competitive job market. For your individual circumstance and situation it makes sense for those employers to be pickier in hiring new grads due to a lack of experience since John Hopkins is a nationally renowned institution and I'm sure the surrounding hospitals want to pull the best from the surplus not being hired from within the best hospital in the area. For your circumstance I understand your mentality. And this may also apply to the original posters circumstance too. However I don't see the point in pressuring yourself to achieve something that will inevitably become irrelevant in your working future. The reason I said to include volunteer work is that any competent employer will see this as a benefit to the experience of the applicant. On the topic of the GRE I am unaware of schools outside of the southern states as that is mainly where I reside but I have yet to hear of a program no longer accepting the GRE. It usually boils down to a 3.0 gpa or a certain GRE score alongside certain experience for the program you are getting into. Sure if you are mainly looking at CRNA programs then they are extremely picky with applicants and having a high GPA whilst in nursing school will help guarantee one a position. However if we are talking nursing education, leadership, or NP school I have yet to see a program that absolutely will not accept a GRE score. I wasn't meaning to imply that grades don't matter. But for the average nurse who works in a setting where there isn't a huge surplus which at this point seems to be the national norm, there is no reason to put so much pressure on a student to achieve perfect scores when the average is usually B at the best. Getting your degree and passing the NClex is ultimately what's most important. Beyond that unless you have majorly high aspirations there's no reason to add more stress. I may come across as naive in my sentiments but I do have surrounding expertise to validate my claims for the area I reside in. I see your point and I don't mean to dismiss it just that the original posters should take into consideration who's point relates more to their circumstance. In my area not getting the position you originally wanted is normal but not finding a job period as an RN is unheard of.
  8. Flylik3abr1

    Grades when you were in Nursing School

    I think a lot of these nurses suggesting that grades matter during the hiring process have been in a position for a long period of time or just work in an area congested with RN's. My mother is a nurse, two of my uncles are nurses, and two of my best friends are nurses who work at the highest rated hospital in my state according to the U.S. News & World Report circa whatever year they got it (doesn't really matter it was recent). None of them have ever been asked for a transcript. Inevitably as a nurse, your two biggest factors in your hiring is your license and your resume. As a new grad, you will have a disadvantage with the resume aspect but most hospitals only care if you are licensed and will take into consideration your preceptor as a reference and any volunteer work you may have done while you were in school. Also for grad school realistically unless we are talking Ivy league screw the 3.0 GPA. Has no one ever heard of the GRE? Grad entrance exams still exist and unless you are going to a private college that is all "prestigious" and full of mommy and daddy money you will be fine and be able to achieve whatever degree or credential you want as long as you work for it and don't give up. Just do whatever you can to pass your classes and get your degree so you can get your license. That's what will get you the experience you want.
  9. Flylik3abr1

    Is this nursing?

    I have yet to become an RN but I am more cognizant of the harsh realities of nursing than my peers. My mother is an LPN, two of my uncles are RN's, and two of my closest friends are RN's. I have seen their quality of life have its ups and downs. Although many of you may treat this as a naive issue on my part I have and always will say this. The grass is always greener on the other side. Yes, there are other fields that "statistically" have equal or better pay for less or the same education and "improved working conditions" but numbers won't equate to your individual experience. I have seen too many computer science majors tank in the job market due to not wanting to relocate to larger cities where the jobs are actually at. I have known plenty of accountants who hate their lives because they are basically punching numbers in a cubicle for hours on end, so on and so forth. Every job has its downsides. I don't choose this field for any sense of glory or respect. I understand that should I make it through nursing school I may work very odd and grueling hours, with little to no praise, or even support sometimes from my peers. The work is hard and sometimes seems impossible to maintain long term. Bureaucracy and politics exist in every work environment and that's just, unfortunately, an aspect of the working world. Bedside nursing has the highest turn over rate. I know from my uncle's experience that often times people who become burned out at the bedside to find their work much more satisfying when they become some sort of specialty outside of acute care. I have yet to even make it to my preceptorship, let alone work a regular schedule as a floor nurse but I don't anticipate my first job to be a pleasant one. I know myself and from what I have seen I don't see myself doing it for long (bedside that is), but I do enjoy a lot of aspects of nursing. Coming from a guy who has worked a variety of service roles I would rather not get praise for pushing medications and saving someone's life for decent pay, than wait and buss tables for dollars and pennies. If you actually have a genuine love for computers and technology and are willing to chase down jobs then, by all means, change your career. Hell, I may do the same thing when I inevitably face the same situation as you. But don't completely switch careers because you feel stuck in the area you are at or the facility you work in. Try different things in nursing. Don't put all of that time and education to waste (even if in reality you never used the majority of it). You chose nursing for a reason beyond praise and recognition (I hope). Don't let that be the reason you quit.
  10. Flylik3abr1

    ICU approach vs Floor nurse

    So I seem to be always questioning things I see happening in the hospitals I do clinicals at. Between seeing blood products being thrown away in the regular trash and complete disregard of sterile technique for sterile procedures there is a laundry list of concerns I have compiled for my own education that was essentially dismissed by my lecture instructor. One thing I have noticed in particular is my medsurg instructor's way of handling things. So I am in my second semester of nursing school and we have had our clinical options open up to be following all different kinds of instructors for different hospitals in our area. One instructor, in particular, works full time in the MICU but instructs us for our medsurg rotations and I have noticed some peculiar things about her approach to nursing. She is very much a fact of the matter kind of nurse. Her way is to get it done quickly and don't linger around so you can get done and get out and get on with your life. I get that. However, she will kind of disregard a patients response to uncomfortable procedures and is very brash with patients. I have been told by her to stick sleeping patients with their shots so I don't have to deal with a conversation, I have seen her reattempt an IV insertion wayyy more than the standard "two tries" before you get a PICC team, she doesn't ask questions and enforces her way or the highway regardless if it is to a patient or another nurse. I don't think I have necessarily seen her do things that would be cause for an investigation of sorts but I do wonder, is this just a trait of nursing from an intensive care standpoint not transferring well to a less severe case? or am I being naive about the psychological and emotional aspects and approach to nursing?
  11. Flylik3abr1

    Pain management in nursing

    These are very serious allegations, almost to the point of abuse. Have you talked to your instructor about these situations Unfortunately I am not confident enough in my "official" instructors ability to accomplish tasks to bring this up to her, however I did go out of my way to speak with my clinical instructor about her decision making and the actual nurse who's patient I was working with. The general consensus was that regardless of the pain that patient was experiencing there was a tighter schedule dealing with other patients that my clinical instructor was abiding by that resulted in that patient not receiving any medication until 30 minutes past the onset of the pain symptoms we observed. The nurse herself I observed was documenting at the station outside the patients room where she easily could have heard him screaming out in pain and the family was looking for nurses to assist but nobody was willing to intervene. I understand my instructors explanation about the other medication schedules we had to abide by but in my opinion someone needed to assist my patient sooner than what occured.
  12. Flylik3abr1

    Pain management in nursing

    ADN student here! I was curious to know how you as a nurse approach your patients pain management in the hospital. I have seen plenty of nurses disregard their patients pain despite their medication being past due. I even had a case where a patient of mine who was unable to speak due to a head injury was screaming out in pain, very obviously so especially since his vitals on the monitor became very consistent with a natural response to pain, and the nurse I was working under said "He will be fine, he doesn't need his medicine right now". Is this considered normal? I mean I personally believe pain management is very important and I've heard all kinds of excuses about addiction and feeding into false reports of pain for drugs but that goes against what I'm learning in school so I am curious. Do you treat your patients pain as a priority nursing problem?
  13. Flylik3abr1

    Red flag?

    I am a student in my second semester of RN school and have been considering getting a tech job PRN. I applied around and haven't heard back (contrary to people telling me I'd get hired quickly as a student) from any community hospitals in my area. I saw that one of the major general hospitals in my state a couple cities over was hiring and I applied. I was caught off guard when I got a phone call from them within minutes of applying. They were accepting applications for everything from ED to CVICU to L&D and I applied to all of them. When I showed up for my interview I signed a background disclosure form and was immediately taken to medsurg to meet with the managing team for the unit. I felt a very bad vibe and the nurses looked at me with pity. They asked me basic questions about my school and what skills I have been practicing and the patient populations I have dealt with. The main unit manager seemed to have a bad attitude and didn't ask me any questions and just observed me. Everyone had the energy of "Here we go again another tech that's going to quit." I left and thought they wouldnt call me for a follow up but they just now emailed me some paperwork and attempted to call me but I was in class. I understand medsurg is hard and that doesn't deter me, just the energy from everyone on the unit really rubbed me the wrong way. Should I follow up to the email and continue with the hiring process so I can gain experience or should I trust my gut and just tell them thanks but I need to focus on school full time. I know nursing is of course a very emotionally draining and hard field to work in so I don't expect sunshine and rainbows but the looks I was being given really told Me I should think very long and hard about this. Especially since they were so quick to try to hire me.
  14. Flylik3abr1

    First clinical nightmare

    @maggieellis Our clinical instructor at this hospital has never been on campus to do anything directly with the students. We have another instructor at a different facility who assisted with our labs and validations but I have yet to have a clinical with her yet. She anticipated us to be mostly self functioning like she was in her program.
  15. Flylik3abr1

    First clinical nightmare

    @neonn965 For our Med Admin validation we essentially just demonstrated that we were able to properly draw up and administer different types of injections.
  16. Flylik3abr1

    First clinical nightmare

    @rnhopeful82 We were at school for 4 weeks learning hand washing, putting on gowns, and how to mix and administer medications but we had no open lab hours so any practice we got happened the day of the lab. We haven't had any sort of nursing home or geriatric care experience, we had one with a school nurse and then we were immediately thrown into the hospital. I never met my instructor before yesterday. The only instructors I have met are my current lecture instructor and the one for next semester. We receive no information about clinical aside from the location and day of. I had to email my teacher to get the time and unit. No idea about the 6 rights of med admin. :)
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