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tragicallyhip

tragicallyhip

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tragicallyhip's Latest Activity

  1. tragicallyhip

    Cannabis Nursing

    I was at their conference it was excellent. CCNA is about to be incorporated as a nonprofit and will serve as a network, and education platform for Canadian nurses. They also have associate members as consultants from various scholarly backgrounds, physicians, researchers, specialists etc.
  2. tragicallyhip

    Cannabis Nursing

    The Canadian Cannabis Nurses Association (CCNA) will be incorporated as a nonprofit in the next two months in time for legalization. Mary Lynn Mathre, the founder of the American Cannabis Nurses Association and Patients Out of Time are currently traveling across Canada doing education for nurses and are taking the CCNA message as well.
  3. tragicallyhip

    Shocking News: CRNBC Cuts Library Services

    Also see this: NURSES AIRING DIRTY LAUNDRY: The nasty legal spat fracturing the BC nursing profession | Vancouver Sun
  4. tragicallyhip

    Shocking News: CRNBC Cuts Library Services

    Canadian Healthcare Practitioners’ Access to Evidence Based Information is Inequitable | Melssen | Evidence Based Library and Information Practice Assessing availability of scientific journals, databases, and health library services in Canadian health ministries: a cross-sectional study
  5. tragicallyhip

    Cannabis Nursing

    There is the fb page, Canadian Cannabis Nurses Association too.
  6. tragicallyhip

    Cannabis Nursing

    Thank you!
  7. tragicallyhip

    Shocking News: CRNBC Cuts Library Services

    Hi, Unfortunately, when this article was published all the links were removed or didn't translate properly. This is too bad because they backed up the statements and provided further reading and learning. I used Ontario just as one example. It would be too big of an article to list all provinces and details of all contracts, fees etc. I listed the details and links for BC because in my own circle of nurse friends many were not understanding of how aggregate limits work. Many of the RNs in private practice were not aware of the details of their practice coverage. It is often recommended to buy additional insurance on top of the CNPS insurance. I found out after taking a poll of a group of 50 nurses in private practice that many did not fully understand the coverage details. I'm unfamiliar with LPN coverages or fees. Again, I see a greater overall picture of financial mismanagement: less services despite increasing fees and using member fees to launch and defend lawsuits between our own professional bodies. I utilized CRNBC's library services regularly both as a private practice nurse, or when working for non-profits and as a nurse under a health authority. Links missing from article: About CRNBC Library ARNBC | Association of Registered Nurses of BC | ARNBC Updates Knowledge-based Practice ARNBC | Association of Registered Nurses of BC | About ARNBC 2
  8. tragicallyhip

    Shocking News: CRNBC Cuts Library Services

    The original article submission had links throughout the article linking to all statements and their references and webpages. I'm not sure how they got removed? This was done to verify info within this article. I tried to post another reply with all the links. I will wait and see if it gets published.
  9. tragicallyhip

    Shocking News: CRNBC Cuts Library Services

    CRNBC library notice of shut down, did not list CNA as a resource for journal access. The ARNBC did not list the CNA as a possible resource for journal access either when I spoke to them last month. This is the CNA announcement, note that the EBSCO and Stat ref and e-Therapeutics databases are no longer available: "Library Resources To search our e-book library resources, click the logo of your choice. As of January 1, 2015, the library resources offered on NurseONE.ca have changed. The Ebsco, Stat Ref and e-Therapeutics databases are no longer available. We're excited about our plans to expand our already extensive collection of more than 2,000 e-books. Over the coming months, CNA will be consulting with Canadian RNs to help expand the e-book collection to ensure the selection is highly relevant and useful to current RN practice. Are there topics or specific e-books you would like us to consider adding to our e-library? Send your ideas to members@cna-aiic.ca. - See more at: https://www.nurseone.ca/my-nurseone/library#sthash.AqjbXXFY.dpuf" I fully utilized the CRNBC library on a regular basis. They sent me journal articles and books which I needed as I was in a niche of nursing that was just coming into its own. I am still in areas of nursing that are just beginning to emerge. CRNBC books on a number of nursing areas were outdated, so journal article access was key to making evidenced based decision making. As for throwing ideas unrelated together, from my perspective, I see the ideas as related. RNs are paying increasing levels of fees for less services and in addition paying legal fees for both the Union to sue the ARNBC and the ARNBC to defend themselves against the BC Nurses Union. All costs are covered by RN and NP members. You can listen to the ARNBC point of view presented in the links within the article. As nurses work in more autonomous positions and private practices, access to journals are key.
  10. tragicallyhip

    Shocking News: CRNBC Cuts Library Services

    Shocking news for BC Nurses! CRNBC has cut library services despite increasing fees. BC nurses are caught in the political crosshairs of our union, regulatory body and its member association and it's costing us money. As of March 2017, the CRNBC Canadian Registered Nurses of BC (About CRNBC), BC's licensing body cut library services. See this statement from the CRNBC Library. CRNBC's primary role is to protect the public, yet comparatively, their fees are above some of the other regulatory bodies in Canada. We do pay to be a self-regulating professional however, to what extent and level of fees are we willing and able to pay? In addition, BC nurse's fees are going to the BC Nurse's Union which is suing the Association of Registered Nurses and to the ARNBC to help them defend against these lawsuits. It's time for BC nurses to speak up and protest against the power of some of our nursing professional bodies and misuse of our money. This is nothing short of bullying and abuse of power. Regarding CNRBC's new cuts to library access, they list public health authorities and nurse's alumni universities as avenues through which nurses can access journals and online materials. There is one huge problem. This leaves private, practicing nurses without access to current information to inform evidenced-based practice. Given CRNBC's professional standard's requirement (Knowledge-based Practice) to "Base practice on current evidence from nursing science and other sciences and humanities," private practice nurses are now in the dark and cannot fulfill one of the major standards that CRNBC sets out for practice requirements. The Association of Registered Nurses of BC, our association for nurse advocacy and public policy was not aware of this change until last month. As per CRNBC's suggestion I contacted my former University where I studied for my RN refresher course and found that only current alumni can access their library services. The university's head librarian was not informed of the changes CNRBC had made, nor that CRNBC had listed these solutions/suggestions. Nurses in private practice without access via health authorities can go in person to a local university and obtain a community card, but you cannot access these resources online which is critical for practice. RNs and NPs need access to world wide publications for evidence based practice and research. Given the increasing funds that RNs and NPs pay yearly to CRNBC along with other BC nursing bodies this is highly frustrating. Currently, as of 2017: CRNBC fees are 350.40 dollars for licensing registration. In addition there are details in schedule D. ARNBC fees: 110.55 dollars for our nursing association which advocates for nurses and speaks to public health policy. They are now being sued by the BC Nurse's Union. This means that our union fees are going toward suing our association and ARNBC's fee increases go towards the need to defend themselves. From CRNBC: "A note about additional commercial general liability insurance: All RNs and NPs are also covered by Commercial General Liability insurance provided by Encon Group Inc. If you have questions about this policy, please direct them to ARNBC. ARNBC statement regarding Encon Group Inc for general liability: "All RNs and NPS also have Commercial General Liability insurance coverage provided by Encon Group Inc. There is an aggregate limit of 2,000,000 dollars for all participants and a deductible of 500 dollars applies." This is very important to note. Aggregate limits work as a pool of money offered in a given year for all nursing lawsuits happening in that province. Many nurses are under the impression that they are individually covered for 2 million, this is not the case. CNPS Canadian Nurses Protective Society fees 63.50 dollars for additional liability insurance and offer legal guidance. On a personal note, their services have been outstanding in regards to practice questions. You can now also go to CNPS pertaining to complaints made to your regulatory body. ARNBC plus the CNPS fees total: 174.05 dollars As a comparison, we can look at the licensing body in Ontario Nurse's regulatory/licensing body fee structure as well as the Registered Nurses Association of Ontario who advocate and support nurses as well as speak to public policy. College of Nurses of Ontario: "The 2018 renewal fee for members in the General and Extended classes is 200 dollars. (With HST, the total is 226 dollars.)" RNAO - Registered Nurses Association of Ontario: fees include additional liability insurance much like the BC nurse's CNPS (Canadian Nurses Protective Society). RNAO fees plus liability insurance are: 256 dollars. RNAO also has an addition option of offering LAP, a legal assistance program for 64.57 dollars. How can we as nurses protest these blatant abuses of power and our money as evidenced by a nurse's union suing its member's association? How will nurses in BC access information online for purposes of research and evidenced based practice? Do we now need another body to protect us from our regulatory bodies and unions? How do nurses have a collective voice and how do we stop this? I fear that we are a stressed and burnt out profession and many of us have come to a place of complacency born out of a feeling of powerlessness.What is the answer?
  11. tragicallyhip

    Cannabis Nursing

    No, not yet. I do know that they may need to decrease their seizure meds if taking CBD (cannabidiol) one of the cannabinoids in cannabis. Which of course can be great because they can decrease the side effects of the seizure meds by that decrease. They would have to work with the GP to work with them on the decrease of course. Many patients as you know don't tell their docs they are taking it. Because everyone's endocannabinoid system seems to be unique in the number of receptors. Cannabis is something that needs to be titrated up slowly to avoid over-doing it. CBD is the non-intoxicating cannabinoid and the high CBD formulas are the ones used for example like Charlotte's Web. Where are you located? Back east?
  12. tragicallyhip

    Cannabis Nursing

    HI All, I would like to network with other Canadian nurses working in the cannabis industry. Anyone out there?
  13. So....there are no more RN (diploma) to MSN fast track programs in Canada running. And...University of Victoria just stopped their RN to BSN program. This leaves me to study in the states. Was looking at Aspen University fast track program. It's about 27,000 bucks Canadian with the exchange rate. Any thoughts? How many nurses who have RN diplomas are looking to do this? Uvic tells me there isn't any need for it anymore.
  14. tragicallyhip

    CRNBC stops library services

    See this link, our BC regulatory body has stopped Library services. This is a major issue for nurses in private practice who need to do online research and are not currently an alumni at a university or who are not under other health authorities. We pay CRNBC huge dollars to protect the public and have now lost an important service. This is a glaring gap. The only option is to go in person to a local university and obtain a community card. It is of no use if you are trying to do research while at work. Here is the link: Library
  15. tragicallyhip

    RN role and Cannabis

    Hi I am researching this as well. In another post "https://allnurses.com/nursing-patient-medications/medical-marijuana-role-851235.html" they ask this question as well. I posted a comment and would like feedback from RNs working in the industry already about what they are doing currently. So far in my own research I have accumulated links etc to reference. Here is my own info that I have gleaned so far in exploring the issue: Just a note as well. I see patients one on one for lifestyle management of cardiometabolic syndrome and it's associated issues:I have countless seniors who had severe diabetic neuropathy and finally have a solution. Many find the drops of certain strains/compounds under the tongue very helpful. They help with sleep and consequently are able to better manage pain. Our Canadian Nurses Association is working hard to de-stigmatize Cannabis for the purpose of supporting patients with cancer, fibromyalgia, diabetes, autoimmune inflammation, etc who find relief from this complex plant with over 140 compounds and counting. I will add links to this post from their webinar. I will also add a link from the Academy of Medicine and Science with a free comprehensive PDF book on all the data and studies done so far on Cannabis. There are RNs working in dispensaries whose focus is medicinal use. Other dispensaries are tailored for recreational use, much like liquor stores. RN roles thus far, are not prescribing in Canada but examining patient profiles. For example. patient A comes in with list of medications and conditions, any interacting medications or conditions such as psychiatric (bipolar etc) are automatically flagged and the patient must get a letter from their specialist or doctor before obtaining Cannabis. This is much less interaction with a patient than happens at safe injection sites here in Canada. The nurse does not recommend, counsel, or give any advice on cannabis. Canadian NPs may be able to start prescribing it when legislation is passed. I would also recommend looking at the TED talk from Portugal and what they have done to reduce addiction and use dramatically in their country. They have one of the highest success rates in the world when it comes to addiction. What I find is that there is a lot of moral judgement and nurses are supposed to be critical thinkers that put one's one morals/beliefs aside and think as evidenced based practitioners. So far I have seen emotional responses to this topic rather than informed and critical thinking based. (Cannabis: the evidence) If patients sense judgement they will not reveal anything to nurses and this does nothing to reduce harm. I used to be in the "judgment group" and I have completely with education and research turned my views 180 degrees. I will include a number of links that may be of help. Some reference Safe Injection site documents which may help understand harm reduction. Although, of note, obviously Cannabis is not an opiate but I think it is worth considering since it is still under schedule 1. Canadian Nurses Association on Cannabis: Cannabis in Canada: Implications for nursing in a changing legal and health-care landscape - YouTube National Academy of Science and Medicine, see pdf link for free: Front Matter | The Health Effects of Cannabis and Cannabinoids: The Current State of Evidence and Recommendations for Research | The National Academies Press National Academy of Science and Medicine home page: Error Page 4
  16. tragicallyhip

    Cannabis and Healthcare 2014

    As nurses we need to use the scientific term not slang. Cannabis instead of "pot or weed". And under Cannabis..there are approximately 140 compounds and counting so far with different effects. Some are psychoactive, some have no psychoactive effect..others are anti-inflammatory etc.