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Nurse Magnolia BSN, RN

Psychiatric RN
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Nurse Magnolia is a BSN, RN and specializes in Psychiatric RN.

Nurse Magnolia's Latest Activity

  1. Nurse Magnolia

    Thoughts from a brand new dialysis nurse

    I have worked 3 in a row, but not 4. But it can happen. The shifts really depend on the clinic so that part is true. There are only two 3 day a week clinics in my area so those nurses work 3 12's. But most clinics are 6 day a week clinics with patients coming in M, W, F and a different set of patients coming in T, TH, SAT. Dialysis patients get dialysis 3x week. But because of shift and assignment changes, you likely won't have the same patients every time. But given that the same patients come all week, every week, you end up getting to know your patients very well because eventually, you take care of all of them. The job right now is hard. I'm learning tech work and also starting to throw in some of the nursing things like meds and assessments. At the training clinic, the nurses also have an assignment because it's a small clinic. At my final home clinic, the nurses generally don't take an assignment. It can be a physically exhausting job with ebbs and flows to the day. When it's busy, it's super busy. That's usually at shift change. But we also get a 30 minute on the clock break in the morning and a 45 minute off the clock lunch each day. And I'm out of there by 4 usually. Very early mornings some days. And some days stretch past 10 hours....but then again some days I'm done in 9. It's variable due to patient rides and patients showing up late. I'm still really liking it. I am working a two patient assignment start to finish at this point plus adding in the nursing stuff. I'm looking forward to learning more of the nursing role at my clinic which is more of a care coordination role rather than a hands on patient care role. I will rarely have an assignment after I'm trained unless a tech calls off.
  2. Nurse Magnolia

    Thoughts from a brand new dialysis nurse

    Both nurses at the clinic I am working for started in dialysis straight out of nursing school and have been with Davita for 10 years. I think it would be a pretty good job for a new grad. You won't learn the hospital stuff, but that's not everyone's goal after nursing school. I've only been a nurse for a year, so I'm still a "new grad" and I think that's helped me in dialysis. I'm eager to learn and willing to start at the bottom. Nurses who've been in the hospital for years and built up seniority may struggle with that. Even experienced nurses who are new to dialysis have to learn dialysis and it's a very specialized niche. So in that way, I think new nurses have an advantage. We already know we don't know much so we are willing to listen and learn!
  3. Nurse Magnolia

    Thoughts from a brand new dialysis nurse

    Update: I have now finished 4 weeks at Davita. I still like it . I have learned so much and I'm really getting to know the patients - although that kind of stinks because I am going to switch clinics when my training is done. I can do everything from getting the patients on, to getting them off of the machines, with the exception of cannulation. I learn that this week. Then I can put it all together. So far, so good. I can see myself staying with this company and Dialysis. The 3am wake up's have me exhausted by the end of the week, but in a good way. I have not done a whole lot of "nursing" things, but this is to be expected right now as I need to learn dialysis first. Walk before I run. But I have dipped my toe into the nursing charting systems, policies for contacting the doctors, etc...My manager told me this week he would expect me to be a clinical coordinator at some point (way down the road) which made me feel like I must be doing well. I do not miss the hospital AT ALL. I miss 3 12's, but honestly with how busy dialysis is I'm not sure I could handle a 12 hour shift. The 10's are enough. I'm really glad I tried this - I wasn't sure what to expect. I work with great people and the clinic I am going to after training has an excellent reputation in our area - so I'm hopefully I will like it there also. The biggest difference in clinics is the size. I'm training at a 13 chair clinic and I'll be working at at 24 chair clinic. What I've heard is that the nurses there do less "tech" work because there are so many patients. They are more coordinators of care - which I like as well. I'm glad to be learning things from the ground up. It's a good training program for sure.
  4. Nurse Magnolia

    Thoughts from a brand new dialysis nurse

    So I've been a dialysis nurse for two weeks. I am a second career nurse who spent the first year of licensure as a psych nurse and then decided to make the switch to dialysis for many reasons. I am training at a Davita clinic in the Pittsburgh region right now. My training is 9 weeks in orientation and then three more weeks of independent practice with oversight until I'm on my own completely with my own assignment. I honestly had no idea what to expect. I couldn't even shadow for the job before accepting it because of Covid. I can say I am very pleasantly surprised at how much I am enjoying it so far. Here are my thoughts: The Good: I was worried to begin about being trained by a PCT. In the hospital, the PCT's have far fewer responsibilities and I just couldn't see the value. NOW, I do. The PCT training me is amazing. PCT's in dialysis do so much more and have so many more responsibilities than hospital PCT's and her knowledge is vast. I understand this may vary depending on who's training you - but my preceptor is awesome at her job and she's been there 10 years. The RN preceptor has been there 9 years as well. Everyone I've met has been with Davita for a very long time, giving me a positive image of the company. I learned to set up the machines this week and I am up to doing 3 machines in an hour and helping at turnover getting machines set up. Apparently, this is pretty fast for a brand new person. So I feel like I'm making progress. The flow of the unit is starting to make sense to me as well and I like the pace. Super busy getting everyone on the machines, then time to get caught up and talk to patients, and then it's time to take patients off and put new people on and you are super busy again. The ebb and flow is something I like. I was concerned about PCT's pulling meds for patients, but then I realized once on the unit that it's pretty limited and very little room for error. The nurse verifies that the PCT pulled the right about of heparin before it's given. All other meds are given by the nurse. This fact seemed missed in a lot of the posts I'd read prior to starting. I really enjoy talking to the patients and I'm excited to learn about cannulation next. Right now I am independent up to the point of putting the patient on the machine, including charting. The Bad: There isn't much bad. Getting up at 3am is tougher than I thought. But I work 4am -2pm right now and I like getting home in the afternoon. The class portion is interesting to me, but tough because PCT's and nurses are trained together for the first 12 weeks. The PCT's that I'm working with are amazing because they've been there a long time and succeeded within the company. My training class is another story. Not everyone makes it. And I can tell that some won't. Coming in late, one was sleeping during class, talking back, rudeness, unprofessional. It's tough because the entry-level for the PCT is nothing. No experience needed. All training on the job. So you have people coming straight from working retail or fast food and coming into a professional environment and some just don't know how to behave. There are 8 people in my class. Three nurses, the rest PCT's and of my PCT classmates I can see two making it as they are professional and eager to learn. Lack of previous education does not make one unsuccessful as a PCT, but some of the people literally have no desire to be there except that it makes more money than other entry-level jobs. I feel like the PCT turnover has to be extremely high. I wish nurses were trained separately but I understand why they are not. We are all learning the same things from the ground up. It's just hard being in class with others who don't care, can't keep up with what page we are on, know literally NOTHING about medical terminology and talk back to the amazing instructor we have. The only other bad is the chairside charting system. It is SO OUTDATED and not very user friendly. They are supposed to be getting a new system which will integrate all of their systems and I think that will help a lot. Right now there are several different systems and they don't talk to each other. Other than the class frustration, I've found my first two weeks at Davita to be really good. I'm loving the company culture and the people I've met. I can see myself here for a long time. I hope. I am pleasantly surprised at dialysis nursing. I am still on task mode but am starting to piece together why certain things are done and how that affects the patients. The rationales will come. But for now, I'm happy!
  5. Nurse Magnolia

    Stop Hating on Psych Nurses

    I was a psych nurse for the last 10 months and it is true that other units have no idea what we do and don't hold us in much esteem.....until they are calling crisis responses for little old ladies who are trying to go home and they don't know how to deal with them at all. THEN they need us. They have no idea that we still do meds, wound dressing changes, IV's, or feeding tubes...on people who think you are trying to kill them. Or that we deal with patients in acute withdrawal that end up having seizures. They think we are all sitting in group all day with our blankets. I learned to ignore others perceptions...including my nursing school friends who thought I was crazy for going into psych because I graduated with highest honors. I was "wasting" my time. Fast forward now almost a year and I'm getting out of psych. Not because of any reason other than I want to do something with more nursing skills (psych has some - but not as much as other specialties) - and because someone in psychosis tried to attack me and stated he was trying to kill me. I just didn't always feel safe. So, I'm moving on - but I have the utmost respect for psych nurses and feel such empathy for the patients. Even the guy that tried to kill me was horrified by it when he came out of his psychotic episode. Each specialty has it's niche of people and it's own personality. I just interviewed for dialysis and OR positions and the OR interview basically spend the whole interview telling me that OR nurses are not generally "caring and empathetic nurses" and that if I'm too sensitive I won't do well because, basically, surgeons are jerks. And my dialysis interview focused on interpersonal skills, therapeutic communication since the patients are under the unique stress of being chronically ill and nursing skills. Dialysis seems the right fit for this heart on her sleeve nurse - and yet people STILL are telling me I should have taken the OR job because it SEEMS more prestigious. I'm 48. Nursing is a second career. I'm not looking for prestige. I'm looking for happy. If you find that - do not think one second about what anyone else thinks.
  6. Nurse Magnolia

    Starting new job this week - nervous!

    Hi All, I am a newish nurse (1 year) with a background in psych nursing. I am a second career nurse so I'm in my 40's. I am staring with Davita on Monday and I'm really nervous about it. Because of COVID, I was not able to shadow so I'm going in completely blind - other than watching a few Youtube videos and reading virtually every thread on this page! My friends all think I'm crazy for going into Dialysis so that isn't helping at all. Of course, they are in their 20's (yes - when you go back to nursing school in your 40's, your nursing friends will all be in their 20's!! LOL), and want excitement and prestige. I want a good job where I am challenged and can make a daily difference in patient's lives and I can have upward growth in the company. I was offered two different OR jobs and I turned them both down to do this because I wanted patient contact. My nursing school friends think I'm nuts for doing that. I guess time will tell. But my OR interviewer spent most of the interview asking how I handle conflict and telling me that people that work in the OR are not typically "sensitive, empathic nurses" and that I need to get used to getting yelled at. Yeesh - that didn't sound fun. I'm also a heart on my sleeve, empathetic nurse. So it didn't sound like a good fit. So as exciting as I think it would be to see surgery, I turned it down. So I start training on Monday! I am excited, nervous and also, yes, scared! Any tips for success?
  7. Nurse Magnolia

    ADN vs BSN Nurses' Competency

    This has to be a troll. I’m ignoring starting now
  8. Nurse Magnolia

    ADN vs BSN Nurses' Competency

    No...no you won’t. A nurse who thinks she knows everything and lacks interpersonal skills, empathy, compassion and the ability to communicate therapeutically is not a good nurse.
  9. Nurse Magnolia

    ADN vs BSN Nurses' Competency

    I was saying where you went to school wasn’t adding up. But since you brought it up, you pretty much Have two years of pre reqs and two years of nursing. Or are you basing all of this generalization about being better because you think you have an extra semester of nursing classes? ADN’s take at least a year to do pre reqs before they are in the program. Then two years of nursing classes. YOU do the math. You may think you are smart but your interpersonal skills are lacking and that is a skill that nurses need that often can’t be taught. Seriously, from one 4.0 student to another (I‘ll assume you have straight A’s with all your knowledge and lamenting how easy nursing school is), come back here after even ONE year of nursing. You are In for such a rude awakening as proven by your responses here.
  10. Nurse Magnolia

    ADN vs BSN Nurses' Competency

    Mmmhmm, OK. But you told me to look that you got accepted as a freshman in 2018. That’s where you said you got accepted so....again nothing adds up.
  11. Nurse Magnolia

    ADN vs BSN Nurses' Competency

    You said in your first post that you just finished your first semester in nursing. Things aren’t adding up. And if you have 2.5 semesters of clinical you should have been in a hospital by now. Nursing is a team sport. You are in it for yourself. You will think nurses eat their young because nurses won’t be nice to you. It won’t be because nurses eat their young, it’ll be because nurses don’t have time for people who think they are better than everyone. PS, Palm Beach Atlantic is ranked #42 in Florida and #804 in the country for nursing education. Step off your high horse.
  12. Nurse Magnolia

    ADN vs BSN Nurses' Competency

    Wait....so when you say you just finished your first semester in nursing, you actually mean that you are a JUNIOR and just took your first nursing course....this making you have TWO years of nursing classes exactly like a ASN degree. We keep telling you that the BSN is two years of nursing courses after pre reqs just like ASN programs...you literary just proved that you have the same number of years of NURSING education as ADN’s. I am done with your nonsense and ego...between this post and your other post talking about how easy nursing school is for you, your ego won’t be reasoned with.
  13. Nurse Magnolia

    ADN vs BSN Nurses' Competency

    She did...to gratefulheart365. Thinking she wanted to be more anonymous! I'm curious what she’s been doing for the last three years because she first applied to nursing school in 2017 according to her posts!
  14. Nurse Magnolia

    ADN vs BSN Nurses' Competency

    And all we are saying is you are wrong and there is no evidence to support this. You have a broader education.....it is NOT in patient care knowledge. A BSN is great. No one is “bashing” BSN’s. What we are saying is it‘s not required for a patient care bedside nursing position. It’s just not. You think you are elevating the profession advocating for this, but the way you are advocating for this is actually doing the opposite. You have a right to your opinion, but we have the right to point out that your ONE semester of nursing school might, just might, not be showing you the whole picture. Your entire attitude is condescending and insulting. Even the way you say that you “even” respect CNA’s and LPN’s because you need them to help you do your job. CNA’s and LPN’s deserve your respect because they are people caring for patients...not because of what they can DO for you. You aren’t going to believe any of us.. That’s clear, even though you are arguing with some very expert nurses who are educators and leaders in their field (and I’m not including myself in that...I’ve only been a nurse for a year). But I guarantee someday, some nurse is going to make things clear for you. I hope for the patient’s sake you are willing to listen. Right now you sound like a know it all and that is very dangerous in nursing. Humility is a vital nursing skill you are sorely lacking.
  15. Nurse Magnolia

    ADN vs BSN Nurses' Competency

    16 minutes ago, emilyjoy19 said: Your school is doing you NO FAVORS by instilling this elitist and divisive attitude. Of course your school has to tell you how much better your degree is so that they can continue to charge outrageous private school tuition. They are wrong. Your preceptors all have to BSN’s? Nonsense. So the ADN nurse that’s been there 20 years can’t precept? Preposterous. As someone who was a nurse with a diploma and Is now a nurse with a BSN, I can confidently say you are wrong. The BSN taught me exactly NOTHING that makes me a better floor nurse. NADA. Good luck on the floor with this attitude. I predict you will get eaten alive and have a very difficult transition if you hold yourself in such a high esteem as to think that you are better than ANYONE. Come back in four years. In the meantime you’ll want to look to see that BSN prepared nurses make the same as ADN nurses in most of the country starting out, So while you are looking down on ADN nurses you can pay your 6 figure student loans and the ADN nurse will be laughing all the way while her employer pays for the BSN. You have much growing up to do.
  16. Nurse Magnolia

    ADN vs BSN Nurses' Competency

    I've read this thread with interest. As someone who has 3 bachelor's degrees now, let me tell you, a bachelors degree in and of itself is not a golden ticket. I am a second (third?) career nurse and I've only been a nurse for a year. I graduated from a diploma school (one of the few areas of the country where they are thriving) with a 3.87 GPA and with more clinical hours in my 19 month program than the local highly ranked BSN programs have in their FOUR years. I passed the NCLEX in 75 questions 6 days after graduating. Does it mean I wasn't prepared because I didn't earn the BSN? Well...within the last year I did the RN-BSN online and my employer paid for it 100%. I didn't want to get it. It was my third bachelor's degree, but since my employer was paying for it and I figured it might come in handy someday, I did it. Because of my other degrees, I only had to take 8 nursing classes and I completed it in mere months. Did it make me a better nurse? No way. It was a waste of time for a bedside nurse and I earn about .50 cents more per hour for having it. I did learn how to format APA papers REALLY well though. Because that's a nursing skill that's needed bedside. Anyhoo - just chiming in to say that it doesn't matter. We all take the same NCLEX and when you are working there will be no difference between the diploma or ASN grad and the BSN grad (except, probably, student debt). If you go into your job with a BSN and a superiority complex, they will eat you alive. Everyone is on the same team. My employer actually preferred the diploma grads to the other programs because we had so much more floor experience, we were better able to hit the ground running. I'm still glad I did the BSN. It's helping me with my current job search to a different specialty. But I STILL won't make more money for having it. They just want to see me have it. It's a game. You play it or you don't.
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