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NurseMomTo8

NurseMomTo8

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  1. NurseMomTo8

    The Nursing School to Welfare Pipeline

    That is encouraging! Thank you! And best wishes as you start your new career. Congrats!!
  2. NurseMomTo8

    MOTHER BABY INTERVIEW

    I hope it went well for you!!
  3. NurseMomTo8

    Why I Added RN to My Name

    Well done! I’m sorry for your losses and wish you luck in your journey!
  4. NurseMomTo8

    The Nursing School to Welfare Pipeline

    This is good to know. Thank you! I do think I will see through my first year of the program (LPN) and reassess the market for where we currently live.
  5. NurseMomTo8

    The Nursing School to Welfare Pipeline

    I did some searching and found this article on the MN Nurses website (I live in MN). It was eye-opening to say the least. My local hospital always has job openings for nurses in almost every department, but maybe they aren’t really in need after all. Crazy! https://mnnurses.org/minnesota-nursing-shortage-fact-or-fiction/
  6. NurseMomTo8

    The Nursing School to Welfare Pipeline

    I read through this whole topic yesterday and today between errands and caring for my kids. As someone who has dreamed of being a nurse for the better part of ten years, I have to now wonder what in the world I’m signing myself up for. I’m currently planning on heading into an LPN program at my local community college, which will be followed by another year to earn my ADN. I had planned on getting my MSN eventually, but now I’m questioning if that will even be worth it. It appears the BSN (not mandatory but preferred in my living area) may be something to forego until I have years of experience under my belt. Or maybe I should bypass nursing in general? Lots to think on after reading this thread, but I truly do appreciate hearing from both ends of the spectrum in regards to experiences and opinions on the matter.
  7. NurseMomTo8

    LPN or ADN or BSN?

    Hi everyone! I’ve been a reader and lurker on the site for awhile now and finally decided to ask my first question. I have dreamed of being a nurse for the last ten years and have worked hard on finishing up my prerequisites and keeping up my GPA while being a homeschooling SAHM to nine young kiddos. Suuuuper excited that I am now in a place when I can finally apply to and attend nursing school! Woot! I would love your input on my current predicament The school closest to me is a community/tech college with an LPN program (two semesters with start dates every spring and fall) and a bridge to ADN program (two semesters with only fall starts). It will be the cheapest option for me, as I will get 16 free credits a year (part of my husband’s employer benefits) and the rest will be covered in both grants and cash-flowed. I don’t really desire to get my LPN first and would prefer to go straight to an ADN program, but the ADN program closest to me is just over an hour away (and the clinical parts of the program will also be over an hour away). This ADN program would also be almost completely paid for between free credits and grants, but gas prices would be costly. If I did the bridge from LPN to RN program at my local community/tech college, I would have at least 1 semester of lag in between graduating with my LPN and starting the bridge program (which is highly competitive due to the low number of seats available and the one-a-year start dates) and more realistically a three semester lag. Another option is to go straight for my BSN at the local state college. The program will cost me around $15,000 out of pocket when all is said and done, and the wait list right now is around 1-1.5 years. I do eventually want to earn my BSN, and would have the option to do so for around $8,000 online if I go through the partnership program at my local community/tech college. The last option is to go through Rasmussen College. The only benefit to this would be guaranteed acceptance, accelerated classes, and a BSN at the end. The major downside is cost. I think I could graduate with around $30,000 in student loans (no way could my family afford to cash flow that all, and I would not receive any free credits from my husband’s employer as it is a private school) and be finished in less than two years. I think I know which direction I should go, but I wanted to hear from others who may have faced similar options. What were your deciding factors in going the route you did, and passing up on alternate routes? I already feel like I’m starting the program so much later in life than everyone (I’m almost 33) so I’m naturally inclined to rush into whichever option is fastest, but the logical side of me says that slow and steady wins the race. Help!
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