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MomTo10andNowANurse

MomTo10andNowANurse

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MomTo10andNowANurse's Latest Activity

  1. MomTo10andNowANurse

    Pretty sure I failed

    I’m sure it is part my lack of self-esteem, and part my test anxiety. I had expected to see new content on the NCLEX but I cannot remember seeing anything that I felt confident in answering. 😩 I’m gonna go for a hike today and keep my mind occupied. ☺️
  2. MomTo10andNowANurse

    Pretty sure I failed

    I took my NCLEX yesterday morning and I almost had a panic attack in the middle of it. 😖 It was sooo difficult. And with the mask on, I felt like I couldn’t breathe well. It was awful. It shut off at 75 questions. I had soooo many SATA questions. I don’t see how I could pass. I did the PVT and got the “good” pop up (twice), but I know that isn’t accurate. I graduated with all A’s this past semester, and ATI gave me a 99% chance of passing my first time, but I still felt SO unprepared for the level of difficulty! 😔 Any suggestions for what to study next time? I’ll try to schedule it exactly 45 days out. Is UWorld worth the investment?
  3. MomTo10andNowANurse

    The Nursing School to Welfare Pipeline

    That is encouraging! Thank you! ❤️ And best wishes as you start your new career. Congrats!!
  4. MomTo10andNowANurse

    MOTHER BABY INTERVIEW

    I hope it went well for you!!
  5. MomTo10andNowANurse

    The Nursing School to Welfare Pipeline

    My heart is in nursing, and that is the field I'm most passionate about. ❤️ If I hadn't stumbled across this thread, I wouldn't have even questioned anything. I truly appreciate reading opinions on both sides. I am going to stay the course and complete my LPN next year. 🙂 I live in a bigger area and have no problem commuting to neighboring smaller towns if I need to in order to work as a nurse and build experience/build rapport. I'm one of the odd ones who won't have any student loan debt upon graduation, and I won't need to work full-time right away (although I would love to work full-time eventually). I think my unique circumstances might make the whole transition into nursing less "stressful" for me when compared to those who need to work full-time (understandably so) and who also have large amounts of school loans to repay. Thank you for your reply! I truly appreciate the encouragement! 🙂
  6. MomTo10andNowANurse

    The Nursing School to Welfare Pipeline

    This is good to know. Thank you! I do think I will see through my first year of the program (LPN) and reassess the market for where we currently live.
  7. MomTo10andNowANurse

    The Nursing School to Welfare Pipeline

    I did some searching and found this article on the MN Nurses website (I live in MN). It was eye-opening to say the least. My local hospital always has job openings for nurses in almost every department, but maybe they aren’t really in need after all. Crazy! 😢 https://mnnurses.org/minnesota-nursing-shortage-fact-or-fiction/
  8. MomTo10andNowANurse

    The Nursing School to Welfare Pipeline

    I read through this whole topic yesterday and today between errands and caring for my kids. As someone who has dreamed of being a nurse for the better part of ten years, I have to now wonder what in the world I’m signing myself up for. I’m currently planning on heading into an LPN program at my local community college, which will be followed by another year to earn my ADN. I had planned on getting my MSN eventually, but now I’m questioning if that will even be worth it. It appears the BSN (not mandatory but preferred in my living area) may be something to forego until I have years of experience under my belt. Or maybe I should bypass nursing in general? Lots to think on after reading this thread, but I truly do appreciate hearing from both ends of the spectrum in regards to experiences and opinions on the matter. 🤯
  9. MomTo10andNowANurse

    Anyone taking the TEAS soon?!

    I took the TEAS in 2017 and will probably have to take it again this Fall. I scored an 85% overall, so not really great but not bad. I found all of the Crash Course A&P youtube videos to be a HUGE help. I also bought the yellow Mometrix TEAS study guide and read it through twice. I made flashcards for things I didn't understand. I am well-versed in English and grammar/language usage and score high in those areas without much studying. The paid-for version of the ATI Pocket Prep TEAS app was also VERY valuable, and I was surprised at how similar many of the questions were compared to the test. Lastly, I joined a Facebook group full of students studying for the TEAS test. I loved being immersed in that kind of community, rallying each other on, quizzing each other, giving tips on memorizing key facts, etc. Good luck!
  10. MomTo10andNowANurse

    LPN or ADN or BSN?

    We just paid off my husband's student loans after him being out of school for 7 years, and we are trying super hard to not go back into debt. I agree that Rasmussen is not a good fit for us. My husband's employer only gives free credits to his dependents enrolled in a technical or community college, so unfortunately I won't get help going that route. However, I have almost every single pre-requisite for the BSN program completed, and they will all transfer over to the state college. (I originally went to school to become an English teacher, and have lots of generals already completed.) I think I will get in touch with the admissions counselor again to get a better idea on things I need to do. I should also find out if becoming an LPN will go towards any of their BSN core nursing class credits (I highly doubt it but it is worth asking). Since the program has a long wait list anyways, it might be nice to get started in the nursing field as an LPN. I love what you said about experience gained! I would love to get in the field and start building rapport in my community. I eventually want to become a family nurse practitioner, so years of experience will definitely be on my side. Thanks for the insight! :)
  11. MomTo10andNowANurse

    LPN or ADN or BSN?

    Hi everyone! I’ve been a reader and lurker on the site for awhile now and finally decided to ask my first question. 😊 I have dreamed of being a nurse for the last ten years and have worked hard on finishing up my prerequisites and keeping up my GPA while being a homeschooling SAHM to nine young kiddos. Suuuuper excited that I am now in a place when I can finally apply to and attend nursing school! Woot! I would love your input on my current predicament The school closest to me is a community/tech college with an LPN program (two semesters with start dates every spring and fall) and a bridge to ADN program (two semesters with only fall starts). It will be the cheapest option for me, as I will get 16 free credits a year (part of my husband’s employer benefits) and the rest will be covered in both grants and cash-flowed. I don’t really desire to get my LPN first and would prefer to go straight to an ADN program, but the ADN program closest to me is just over an hour away (and the clinical parts of the program will also be over an hour away). This ADN program would also be almost completely paid for between free credits and grants, but gas prices would be costly. If I did the bridge from LPN to RN program at my local community/tech college, I would have at least 1 semester of lag in between graduating with my LPN and starting the bridge program (which is highly competitive due to the low number of seats available and the one-a-year start dates) and more realistically a three semester lag. Another option is to go straight for my BSN at the local state college. The program will cost me around $15,000 out of pocket when all is said and done, and the wait list right now is around 1-1.5 years. I do eventually want to earn my BSN, and would have the option to do so for around $8,000 online if I go through the partnership program at my local community/tech college. The last option is to go through Rasmussen College. The only benefit to this would be guaranteed acceptance, accelerated classes, and a BSN at the end. The major downside is cost. I think I could graduate with around $30,000 in student loans (no way could my family afford to cash flow that all, and I would not receive any free credits from my husband’s employer as it is a private school) and be finished in less than two years. I think I know which direction I should go, but I wanted to hear from others who may have faced similar options. What were your deciding factors in going the route you did, and passing up on alternate routes? I already feel like I’m starting the program so much later in life than everyone (I’m almost 33) so I’m naturally inclined to rush into whichever option is fastest, but the logical side of me says that slow and steady wins the race. Help!