Jump to content
February 2019 Caption Contest: Win $100! Read more... ×
NurseDrizzles

NurseDrizzles

Nurse|Podcaster
advertisement

Activity Wall

  • NurseDrizzles last visited:
  • 18

    Content

  • 0

    Articles

  • 1,057

    Visitors

  • 0

    Followers

  • 0

    Likes

  • 0

    Points

  1. NurseDrizzles

    oxygen delivery with nasal cannula

    To add to the already correct answers being given, I've seen the plastic prefilled bubblers pop/explode with high flow running through them. Know what manufacturer's recommend and don't exceed those recommendations.
  2. NurseDrizzles

    Trach with oxygen

    I think the first step is having a good stethoscope. While I don't think every nurse needs a crazy expensive one, it's certainly best to have the most upscale one you can afford. I upgraded from a $40 steth to a $140 steth and the difference is profound. The hospital-issue ones hanging at the bedside are cheap and not great for general use, in my opinion. Second, make sure the ear pieces are seated properly in your ears. You want the ear pieces to be tilted slightly forward; imagine them both pointing through your head to the tip of your nose. Third, make sure you're putting it in the right places. If you're over bone, like the scapulae or ribs, you won't hear as well. Move over a litte. Have the patient take deep breaths if able. As far as oxygen conversion, room air has an FiO2(percentage of oxygen) of about 2o%. For every liter of o2 you add, add 4%. so 1 liter is about 24%, 2LPM is 28% and 3LPM would be 32%. If you work with a lot of o2 setups that work in Fi02, then you can print out a little cheat chart and keep it on your badge reel til you know them by heart. I hope this helps!
  3. NurseDrizzles

    Suctioning Question

    Do you guys use in-line suctioning? I imagine most of your patients are vented. On unvented patients, we generally use a new sterile catheter for each time we suction. The splitter can be helpful. With more tenacious secretions I'll usually set up a separate container for each so I can get maximum (safe) suction on each one. When those secretions are thick, it's a nightmare.
  4. NurseDrizzles

    Suctioning Question

    Hi! I'm a respiratory stepdown nurse and I suction trachs on the regular. Generally you suction the trach first. This will cause the patient to cough, causing a buildup of secretions in their mouth. I always have a yankauer nearby ready to go so I can pull the suction cath off (and dispose) and pop the yankauer on. I don't recommend putting the same catheter in their mouth and it probably won't work as well anyway. Remember to always do good oral care on your trached patients. I hope this helps!
  5. NurseDrizzles

    RN-BSN Student Knows Too Much

    Also, I'm disappointed with the level of bite I've received in response, so far. This is how a community shares information and educates newbies? Cool.
  6. NurseDrizzles

    RN-BSN Student Knows Too Much

    that's a more constructive explaination than the first. I guess I should have broken it down more clearly. When you're writing an informal post, and you feel well-versed with the material HOW do you choose what to cite? I feel like i'm arbitrarily picking some facts to add a citation to for the sake of having a citation. How does a student find a balance between adding the appropriate citations while also providing information that is learned on the job?
  7. NurseDrizzles

    RN-BSN Student Knows Too Much

    Whoa, friendly question met with some sarcasm. Ouch. Simply asking about a balance between displaying knowledge ive mastered and pulling a citation for the sake of pulling one. Thanks for your help.
  8. NurseDrizzles

    RN-BSN Student Knows Too Much

    Just wanted to get others' takes on this: What do you do when your pathology instructor expects you to cite references but you literally can just rattle off symptoms, pathos and treatments without cracking a book? fake cite to make them happy or tell them you know this info by heart? *this is a discussion and not a formal paper
  9. NurseDrizzles

    Weird question for clinicals.

    I get so hot when I'm at work, I sometimes can't stand it. So I have a few tips for you. Yes, there are special scrubs made to keep you cool and I encourage you to either get to a scrub store to try a bunch on, or read online reviews before purchasing. Also, I bought a wearable fan on amazon. You wear it around your neck (it has a break away adjustable lanyard) and it sucks air from in front of you and a little spinning fan blows it up at your neck and face. I can't go to work without this. It makes such a big difference. BUT you gotta be careful in situations where you may not want what's in front of you blowing at your face. I take off in isolation rooms and I turn it off if I'm doing somethig with bodily substances or something that could be gross or contaminating. If you can't get or use one of those, there are little foldable fans that look like frisbees. you can carry them in your pocket and take them out and pop them open to fan yourself cool again. Get some kind of body powder for sweaty areas, like Gold Bond or something similar. In a pinch I once sprayed myself down with dry shampoo, though I can't really recommend that for your skin. I use these things before my shift, rather than after I start to sweat. By then it's too late. When you go to the bathroom - if you get a bathroom break, lift your shirt up and fan off a little bit. Splash a bit of cold water on your face or back of your neck. I keep face washing wipes in my bag to keep myself from looking shiny. I keep a couple feminine wipes in my pocket for times I made need them. Buy sweat-wicking undies and sports bras. When you take refrigerated meds out, linger with the door open for an extra 5 seconds. Stay hydrated. I hope these things help. Happy Nursing, Adrianne
  10. NurseDrizzles

    Social Media and Patients

    Does your organization let you truncate or omit your last name from your badge?
  11. NurseDrizzles

    Social Media and Patients

    It's a valid point. Since I work for a state hospital, I also care for patients who are incarcerated, only they're on my turf and they have one or two guards with them at all times. Not only do I not want to accept them on any online platform, I'd prefer they not know my last name. While I believe all patients have a right to know who is caring for them, I also worry about my own safety. My town isn't so big that I'd be difficult to find. Do your patients have access to your full name? Do you have to wear an ID badge? I'm very curious.
  12. NurseDrizzles

    Social Media and Patients

    Well, it sounds like the choice is pretty obvious for most of us. I know there are nurses out there who cross these boundaries. I wanna hear from you folks. No judgement or arguments...just wanna hear from the other side of the aisle!
  13. NurseDrizzles

    Social Media and Patients

    I goofed up my poll....haha. those are the only choices you get. please comment folks.
  14. NurseDrizzles

    Social Media and Patients

    There's so much to consider when nurses login to any social media platform. Can your employer or potential employers see things you'd rather they not see? Are you violating HIPAA? Are you protecting our trusted profession's image? It's enough to make a lot of people avoid social media altogether. Now let's add another obstacle to the gauntlet of social media: patient friend request. I had my first one a little while ago. I had already decided when I took my nursing job that I would not be connecting on a personal level with past, current or potentially (recurring) future patients. I didn't really think about it much, even though I know some of my co-workers are linked up to some of our "frequent-flyer" patients on various platforms. Then it happened. A patient that had a profound impact on me sent a Facebook friend request and suddenly I was truly conflicted. On one hand, I had my default setting of "no, absolutely not", but this time I also had an equal and opposing force. I wanted to accept this patient, look at all their photos, see how they were enjoying their life post recovery, give them the scoop on the unit...but then reality trickled back in. What about my rule? So I actually wrote about all the caveats on my blog as a way to kind of work through this issue on a public platform, to seek out others who may be like me - staunchly against blurring professional and personal lines, but also feeling the desire to reach out to people I've seen through times of darkness and light. I'd love to start a conversation here. I know my opinion won't change. I declined her request, but not without sending a brief and warm "I wish you well, but I don't do that" reply. It's a very personal decision and one that has both potential benefits and serious consequences. Do you accept patients as friends on social media? Why or why not? I'd love to hear from someone who is active online that feels differently than I do...speak up!
  15. NurseDrizzles

    iPhone app - patient tracker/to do list

    I totally forgot... Google Keep!!! Works like digital post-it notes. A note can be a checklist, you can set a reminder for each one. The note can be a photo or document, whatever. You can color code them, categorize, drag and rearrange,. I swear I use it daily in personal and professional life. It's the best and it's free. Tell everyone!
×