Jump to content

Preceptor legal responsibility with new RN

Nurses   (487 Views | 5 Replies)

1,232 Profile Views; 15 Posts

Hi all!

I am looking for the legal responsibilities for a nurse preceptor when orienting a new RN. My search terms are not giving me very good results. Any help is appreciated.

Meredith

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

klone has 14 years experience as a MSN, RN and specializes in Women's Health/OB Leadership.

4 Followers; 13,509 Posts; 117,413 Profile Views

As far as I know, there are none. She is an independently licensed RN.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1,155 Posts; 7,849 Profile Views

None.  They don’t work under anyone’s license.  They work under their own license.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

kp2016 has 20 years experience.

328 Posts; 3,621 Profile Views

For the most part we are nurses and can't / shouldn't give legal advice. If you have concerns about your liability in the role of a preceptor you need to talk to your manager or HR and ask for their official policy or consult a lawyer. In the most general of terms as per my education as a nurse not a lawyer. The preceptor is a licenced RN and accountable for the care she provides or fails to provide. A new hire RN being orientating to any area is also a licensed RN and accountable to the hospital and the BON for any care that they provided or failed to provide. Degrees of accountability (blame) may depend on the exact situation but that really is outside of my scope.

If you are concerned that something has already happened that could jeopardize your job or your license i'd be seriously considering paying for some real advice from a professional that is representing me. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ruby_jane has 10 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in ICU/community health/school nursing.

4 Followers; 2,761 Posts; 11,360 Profile Views

What does your work policy say? And do you have malpractice insurance - if so, what do they say?

If the new RN administers something, make sure s/he signs that s/he did it (not that you did it). 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jory has 10 years experience as a MSN, APRN, CNM.

1 Follower; 1,435 Posts; 13,132 Profile Views

There are no legal responsibilities outside of performing within your scope.  The new nurse practices under her own license.  If she makes a mistake, that is on her.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
×

This site uses cookies. By using this site, you consent to the placement of these cookies. Read our Privacy, Cookies, and Terms of Service Policies to learn more.