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Possibility of Working as a CNA For Med-Surg But Rethinking

Posted
Kiroppi Kiroppi (New) New Pre-Student

Has 2 years experience.

I am an upcoming senior nursing student and recently offered an interview for PCT/CNA position on a Med-Surg floor. However, I am slowly regretting or just extremely nervous about this. My first semester of clinicals sucked big time, and my second semester clinical hours in the hospital was cut in half because of Covid so everything was virtual. Even though I have completed my basic skills in lab, I am not confident in even my CNA skills. I enjoyed my second semester clinicals on the Med Surg floor and gained a little confidence. This hospital I am interviewing for is a different branch/campus, and the main branch is about 20 minutes away. I have a lot of worries. Apparently, their turnover rate is quite high. I talked to a few people who worked at this campus said they highly recommend me not working here since management always leave their workers hanging dry and one time when a tech was fired unjustly. Now, I do understand we are in a middle of a pandemic. Actually the entire hospital system furloughed half of their employees except for nurses, doctors, RT, PA, etc around April and May. Should I be suspicious of that as well? I am also terrified that if any unfortunate case (I get fired), I can never apply to work for this hospital system again which scares me senseless. Also, I do not know if this matters but I am EXTREMELY short and have trouble turning, lifting, and rolling patients (no muscle strength), so I often have to ask others especially the RN and techs to help me with basic patient care. There is also an uncertainty with us going back to school and our schedules possibly changing drastically. The PCT position application says this is a PRN weekend nights as needed. However, I received an email today (after submitting my application) of the possibility of schedule change meaning change of clinical dates. There is a possibility of having a weekend (Saturday) clinical. I'm extremely worried about the working environment as well. What am I supposed to do if my nurse manager sucks and everyone there is rude and doesn't want to help. I feel as though I can handle patients well enough but have a little trouble communicating with other team members sometimes (I'm just that shy). Also, I understand that Covid will not go away but there is still some worry as my parents have chronic health problems such as heart disease, diabetes, etc. I sometimes worry about bringing it home to them.

I am very nervous for this interview and if I should even work as a tech at this point. I understand that having this experience will help me tremendously; however, I have been told one does not need to be a CNA/PCT in order to become a good nurse. Should I still go to the interview for practice? Or get the impression of the nurse interviewing me?

Has anyone been in a similar situation lately. Anybody willing to give their two cents? Also, does anybody have a good tip on how to reject an offer from a company but still want to work for them in the future as a RN. Is that possible?

Edited by Kiroppi

scribblz, BSN, CNA, LPN

Specializes in Med Surg, Tele, Geriatrics, home infusion. Has 14 years experience.

Hi Kiroppi,

Sounds like you have a lot of anxiety about what the future may bring... I hear you uncertainty in one's skills when you are starting out is totally normal!

I recommend strongly considering taking the tech position. The hands on/ real world experience will teach you things you'll never get in school. You may not get taller, but you'll get stronger and learn techniques for manuevering patients from your co-workers. You can learn a great deal through observing how experienced nurses care for their patients.

This job would offer you a glimpse into the hospital/ unit's dynamics. You can find out which are the good units to work on. If you meet a nurse that seems like they are knowledgeable and friendly ask them if they would be open to being your mentor/ show you things if they are doing a skilled procedure.

Being per diem is low commitment other than the orientation and a good option for working it around your clinical schedule.

There are multiple excellent interview threads on this forum that I would recommend reading to prepare you for the interview.

Best of luck to you!

Sour Lemon

Has 9 years experience.

2 hours ago, Kiroppi said:

I am an upcoming senior nursing student and recently offered an interview for PCT/CNA position on a Med-Surg floor. However, I am slowly regretting or just extremely nervous about this. My first semester of clinicals sucked big time, and my second semester clinical hours in the hospital was cut in half because of Covid so everything was virtual. Even though I have completed my basic skills in lab, I am not confident in even my CNA skills. I enjoyed my second semester clinicals on the Med Surg floor and gained a little confidence. This hospital I am interviewing for is a different branch/campus, and the main branch is about 20 minutes away. I have a lot of worries. Apparently, their turnover rate is quite high. I talked to a few people who worked at this campus said they highly recommend me not working here since management always leave their workers hanging dry and one time when a tech was fired unjustly. Now, I do understand we are in a middle of a pandemic. Actually the entire hospital system furloughed half of their employees except for nurses, doctors, RT, PA, etc around April and May. Should I be suspicious of that as well? I am also terrified that if any unfortunate case (I get fired), I can never apply to work for this hospital system again which scares me senseless. Also, I do not know if this matters but I am EXTREMELY short and have trouble turning, lifting, and rolling patients (no muscle strength), so I often have to ask others especially the RN and techs to help me with basic patient care. There is also an uncertainty with us going back to school and our schedules possibly changing drastically. The PCT position application says this is a PRN weekend nights as needed. However, I received an email today (after submitting my application) of the possibility of schedule change meaning change of clinical dates. There is a possibility of having a weekend (Saturday) clinical. I'm extremely worried about the working environment as well. What am I supposed to do if my nurse manager sucks and everyone there is rude and doesn't want to help. I feel as though I can handle patients well enough but have a little trouble communicating with other team members sometimes (I'm just that shy). Also, I understand that Covid will not go away but there is still some worry as my parents have chronic health problems such as heart disease, diabetes, etc. I sometimes worry about bringing it home to them.

I am very nervous for this interview and if I should even work as a tech at this point. I understand that having this experience will help me tremendously; however, I have been told one does not need to be a CNA/PCT in order to become a good nurse. Should I still go to the interview for practice? Or get the impression of the nurse interviewing me?

Has anyone been in a similar situation lately. Anybody willing to give their two cents? Also, does anybody have a good tip on how to reject an offer from a company but still want to work for them in the future as a RN. Is that possible?

Well, do you have to work? If you do have to work, what are your other options? Go to the interview and see how things go. If you get an offer, then you can worry about all of those other things.

Been there,done that, ASN, RN

Has 33 years experience.

No way in Hades would I go into a hospital... even for an interview. They are hotbeds of infection.

I'm also a student with a year to go currently doing mental health clinical. I wear a mask over my n95 and goggles. Btw our mental health clinical has no patient care involved.

When I'm offered 2k a week, benefits and supplied with PPE including n95s I will certainly start working as a tech. For anything less it's like Aretha sang, "Ain't no way, Ain't no way!" When I become an actual nurse sure I'll do what the job requires. No sense in trying to be a hero when hospitals don't give a damn about nurses let alone PCTs. Is risking your health worth 1x.xx?