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Polycystic syndrome

Posted
madgina madgina (New) New

why ovarian polycystic synrome patient take metformin

nrz2bee

Specializes in CNA in LTC, Hospital.

They take metformin(usually for diabetics) to regulate their insulin levels. metformin controls their insulin resistance which is something diabetics and pcos sufferers have in common. when the insulin resistance decreases their body weight may also decrease which then reduces many of the symptoms for pcos sufferers such as infertility, hair loss, acne, skin tags,hirsuism(male pattern hair growth),etc. metformin doesnt work for everyone and may not work for everyone in the same way. many women with pcos take metformin when they are trying to conceive. the insulin resistance is why many women have difficulty losing weight even if they eat healthy. sugar and carbs are usually a big no no for their diets if they want to lose weight b/c they have a slower metabolism than most women. I hope this helps:):D

Yep. I have PCOS and have been on metformin. The above poster is right.

I get really sick of doctors asking me how often I check my blood sugar or what my last A1C was... I'm not diabetic, thanks. I'd be close to it if I wasn't on the metformin though.

TiffyRN, ADN, BSN, PhD

Specializes in NICU. Has 27 years experience.

I did some research on pre-diabetes as I was warned if my next follow up blood glucose was elevated I would be classified as such. My understanding was the following conditions; pre-diabetes, insulin resistance syndrome and PCOS are all very closely linked and sometimes hard to tell "the chicken from the egg", i.e, which one causes the other, but they are frequently all present.

Often all those conditions will improve if the patient can lose around at least 10% of their body weight. Doing such decreases insulin resistance. Another way to decrease insulin resistance is to take metformin. Some people cannot achieve weight loss or it insufficient to overcome their insulin resistance and ease their PCOS symptoms and they require both.

I lost weight, exercised and my blood sugar levels are normal. I needed to have done it years ago but needed the wake up call that the lab results gave me to make the change.

mommy.19, MSN, RN, APRN

Has 7 years experience.

PCOS (named by the appearance of the unruptured follicles in the ovaries -aka cysts- giving the ovaries a chocolate chip cookie appearance) used to be referred to as "syndrome X" or metabolic syndrome. It is now officially referred to as "anovulation" or, absence of ovulation. As TiffyRN said, it is often difficult to find which situation came first, ovarian dysfunction/decreased estrogen production or insulin resistance. Most, but not all women diagnosed with anovulation are overweight and have extreme difficulty losing weight and conceiving. They are NOT diabetic by virtue of being dx'd with anovulation, however "pre-diabetes" aka impaired fasting glucose (above 110 mg/dL in most institutions) is an issue with these women. In the absence of normal levels of circulating estrogen, endogenous androgens are no longer opposed as they would be with normally functioning ovaries. This gives rise to the symptoms of weight gain, hirsutism, abdominal obesity, lethargy, as well as a slew of other s/s. Also, since insulin stores in fat, the more weight gained, the more insulin resistant the tissues become. Metformin increases target tissue sensitivity to insulin allowing blood sugar levels to return to a more normal level, even allowing most individuals to lose some amount of weight, making less fat available for insulin to be stored in. Treatments also include oral contraceptives to take over for the dysfunctioning ovaries that are no longer correctly producing estrogen. What a mess, eh?

You got some good responses so I won't repeat anything. Just wanted to add... I took metformin while TTC for both my kids. I tried much longer but I was on it for 4 months both times and finally got pregnant. But I know some women take it and it doesn't work.

PCOS (named by the appearance of the unruptured follicles in the ovaries -aka cysts- giving the ovaries a chocolate chip cookie appearance) used to be referred to as "syndrome X" or metabolic syndrome. It is now officially referred to as "anovulation" or, absence of ovulation. As TiffyRN said, it is often difficult to find which situation came first, ovarian dysfunction/decreased estrogen production or insulin resistance. Most, but not all women diagnosed with anovulation are overweight and have extreme difficulty losing weight and conceiving. They are NOT diabetic by virtue of being dx'd with anovulation, however "pre-diabetes" aka impaired fasting glucose (above 110 mg/dL in most institutions) is an issue with these women. In the absence of normal levels of circulating estrogen, endogenous androgens are no longer opposed as they would be with normally functioning ovaries. This gives rise to the symptoms of weight gain, hirsutism, abdominal obesity, lethargy, as well as a slew of other s/s. Also, since insulin stores in fat, the more weight gained, the more insulin resistant the tissues become. Metformin increases target tissue sensitivity to insulin allowing blood sugar levels to return to a more normal level, even allowing most individuals to lose some amount of weight, making less fat available for insulin to be stored in. Treatments also include oral contraceptives to take over for the dysfunctioning ovaries that are no longer correctly producing estrogen. What a mess, eh?

I prefer "Hot mess" actually. =)

EarthChild1130

Specializes in Psychiatric. Has 9 years experience.

I prefer "Hot mess" actually. =)

This is totally off topic but that made me laugh...one of my favorite preceptors used that saying for everything, and I got to where I'd say it too...I've been relocated b/c hubby's military, and when I say it now I get some STRANGE looks!! lol

Sort of related to the topic...I had PCOS too and was on metformin for awhile...it didn't work, and, after being diagnosed additionally with endometriosis which did not respond well to therapy, I had TAH/BSO...I would say 'sadly, it didn't work'...only I'm not too sad about it really. I've felt wonderful since then!

:D