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OKLAHOMA LPN

drumart5 drumart5 (New) New

Hello,

I am an ASN graduate from EOSC. I obtained my LPN through that program. I am still having trouble passing the RN state boards and the time limit is up for me to take the RN test in OK. I moved to Texas because they allow more time to pass. My time limit is up here too. I just don't know why Texas WILL NOT take my LPN.

I researched a bit and found that Colorado will accept my LPN if I am a resident of the state, and allow me to take the RN. I have a relative there and an opportunity to move if I want to.

I have a couple of questions.

Would it be best to move to CO. and get a job as an LPN as soon as I become a resident?

I planned from the beginning to have the job (hopefully) pay for the classes needed to get the BSN.

Should I just buckle down and go back to school and get the BSN here in Texas and/or do this on Colorado?

I would probably find it easier to pass after getting refreshed by going back to school anyway.

I am a bar/restaurant person so finding a job is not problem for me. (usually, this economy is frightening to someone my age as well. 49)

One more thing, should I just give up the whole thing and go back in to bar/restaurant management?

Very frustrated and burned out on all of it!

NurseGirl525, ASN, RN

Specializes in ICU.

How long ago did you graduate from the ASN program? How many times have you taken the NCLEX? Instead of constantly moving around to get more time, you may not be understanding basic nursing concepts you learned in school. Plus if it has been over two years, you may have to take a refresher course.

I graduated in 2010 (a little embarrassed to say) and my last application here in Texas took exactly one year to go through. I have taken it 5 times. I know I need a refresher course. I am looking into those now and will try to make the course and the next test close together so it will be fresh. I am really becoming frustrated/disenchanted with the whole thing, but I am driven to be an RN. I feel as though the education in the rural area I was in was probably not that great.

I have been reading some really disheartening threads in here about the way the ASN and LPN people are being pushed toward hospice/LTC and home health. My interest lies in the OR as well.

Any suggestions on refresher course(s)?

TheCommuter, BSN, RN

Specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych.

Would it be best to move to CO. and get a job as an LPN as soon as I become a resident?
Welcome to Allnurses.com!

Personally, I think it would be best if you enrolled in an NCLEX review course before making yet another relocation effort. Specifically pick a review course that focuses on content, such as the Hurst Review. Be mindful that NCLEX is a national exam, so it is not going to get easier or harder by relocating to another state.

More time is not what you need. You need a good content review that will help you pass NCLEX because, as the previous poster mentioned, you are missing some very basic concepts if you cannot pass an exam that only requires you to answer 50 percent of the higher level questions correctly.

Good luck to you!

I know I need to do the review course. My time is up to take the boards here in Texas. I want the course to be very close to the next time I test. I could do that in CO. Is there a state that will allow me take the boards here in Texas without having to be a resident of that state?

I guess I am confused about you saying that you can't retake the NCLEX in oklahoma again. If a refresher course is all that you need then why not do that in Oklahoma and retake the exam? I to failed the exam and I am struggling with what my next step is to be able to pass it, this is why I am asking you these questions..

OK has a 2 year limit on taking the test without having to take any refresher courses. My instructors informed me that if one did not pass the exam in Oklahoma within the 2 years, that I would have to go back and do the last 2 semesters again (of the 2 year ASN program). (someone please correct me if I am wrong, I have not done any research into this)

Texas has a 4 year window. Colorado has no limit/time parameter for testing, and does not require any refresher courses from what I understand. The only thing with Colorado is one has to be a resident of the state to take advantage of that. I have really come to the conclusion it would probably be best for me to go back and get the online BSN. After coming in here and reading several threads on a lot of facilities requiring a BSN more than not, it might be better for me. I planned on taking the classes needed online when I began working as an ASN RN anyway. So much time has passed for me that it might be best to get the BSN now.

That would also allow me to get back into the mindset needed for the test. It would help pull the information back out of my memory and refresh all that I learned hopefully. Some people have suggested becoming a sonographer. Does anyone have an opinion on this? I am really in a state of flux right now!

I did find an RN to BSN program at UTA (Arlington, Texas) it is 8,995.00 and 10 months. I can probably do this in either state I choose to live in (I'm sure I could find something similar in CO.). I do have a question, would getting the BSN through an online course here in Texas allow me to be eligible to take the test here and another 4 years to pass the exam?

Edited by drumart5

TheCommuter, BSN, RN

Specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych.

I have really come to the conclusion it would probably be best for me to go back and get the online BSN.

Virtually all online RN-to-BSN degree completion programs require that you possess an RN license at the time of admission, which is why they are called RN-to-BSN programs. They are designed for nurses who are licensed RNs.

Although you have earned the associate degree in nursing, you do not have an RN license, so I am highly doubtful you will find a legitimate online RN-to-BSN program that would be willing to grant you admission without RN licensure.

LadyFree28, BSN, RN

Specializes in Pediatrics, Rehab, Trauma.

Virtually all online RN-to-BSN degree completion programs require that you possess an RN license at the time of admission, which is why they are called RN-to-BSN programs. They are designed for nurses who are licensed RNs.

Although you have earned the associate degree in nursing, you do not have an RN license, so I am highly doubtful you will find a legitimate online RN-to-BSN program that would be willing to grant you admission without RN licensure.

THIS.

You have a few options as a few posters added:

1. Take a refresher course as posted already;

2. Find a GOOD NCLEX review;

OR

3. Enroll in a generic BSN program and start all over again.

Personally, I think you need to take a refresher course in your area; you don't need to move around as other posters have stated.

If you are having great difficulty grasping the knowledge, since you want your BSN, you LAST resort is trying to enroll in a generic BSN program; which, I don't think you should do, but it is an option; but the refresher course will save you money and time; bite the bullet and retake the classes needed in order to get you on the path in obtaining your license if you run out of time.

There is no time limit for certain states from what I have researched. It looks like one has to be a resident of the state where that is possible. Can anyone tell me if this is true? (It is for Colorado) I did not know that in order to get into an RN to BSN program I had to already be a licensed RN. This changes my focus to the refresher course(s). Moving is not that big of a deal to me. I have no kids, no pets, single, and my family is scattered throughout the US. My immediate family is not a cohesive family unit either. I'm close to my mom. She is doing fine (house paid off, a good mate, etc...). If I do decide to make a move I have minimal obstacles to get over. I would actually be a perfect candidate for travel work because I have no ties really.

Would it be an option to move to the Texoma area, still be a resident of Texas and work in Oklahoma as a LPN, while taking a refresher course in Texas and then taking NCLEX in Texas? If Oklahoma requires you to retake the last year of school then I understand staying in Texas, however if you have an Oklahoma LPN license, why not use it? Since you said "time is up" in Texas does that mean you can still take a refresher in Texas and attempt the NCLEX again or are all your options up there too? Have you looked at working for the VA in Texas? I have heard that you can be licensed any where in the United States and it will be accepted at the VA but I'm not sure that is true for nurses. Good luck.

ETA "

Nursing candidates are expected to apply to the Board within two years of the time they graduate. A candidate who fails to do so must either enroll in an approved refresher course or take nursing coursework that includes, at minimum, 80 hours of classroom/ laboratory review and 80 hours of clinical work.

"

This came from http://www.nursinglicensure.org/ - it looks like a refresher course is an option in Oklahoma too.

Edited by RHIA, RN

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