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OB tech and doula training

Ob/Gyn   (1,767 Views 6 Comments)
by cel122 cel122 (New Member) New Member

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I plan on starting my CNA courses in the fall and plan on becoming an ob tech. Would doula training help with getting a job in th ob department?

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1,986 Posts; 14,092 Profile Views

Speaking as a doula and CNA, I don't think that doula training would help get your foot in the door, so to speak. The tasks of a CNA usually are more technically based. I'm not saying to not get doula training, it couldn't hurt, but I don't think it would necessarily give you an edge.

This is just my opinion and someone else may say differently.

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33 Posts; 1,305 Profile Views

I think that anyone wanting to work in OB should have doula training. I got a job interview in OB and was the top candidate out of 30 others specifically because of my doula training. Good luck!

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104 Posts; 1,458 Profile Views

As both a former CNA and a Doula I would even say that Doula training on your C.V. might be more of a hinderance than a boost.

Some Nurse Managers might be worried that an OB Tech with Doula training would attempt work outside her scope.

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33 Posts; 1,305 Profile Views

As both a former CNA and a Doula I would even say that Doula training on your C.V. might be more of a hinderance than a boost.

Some Nurse Managers might be worried that an OB Tech with Doula training would attempt work outside her scope.

I don't agree. Being a doula means knowing about the process of birth and is all about communication with child-bearing women. I don't see how improving your communication skills and knowledge would ever be a hinderance. The nurse managers in OB that I have spoken to see it as an asset. It shows your interest in birth and dedication.

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KellNY is a RN and specializes in High Risk In Patient OB/GYN.

710 Posts; 7,476 Profile Views

I don't agree. Being a doula means knowing about the process of birth and is all about communication with child-bearing women. I don't see how improving your communication skills and knowledge would ever be a hinderance. The nurse managers in OB that I have spoken to see it as an asset. It shows your interest in birth and dedication.

Because as a poster mentioned above, an ob tech is mostly technical-stripping beds, setting up the birthing table, cleaning up after the birth (housekeeping doesn't do bio-mat, at least not where I work), stocking the rooms, QC testing, etc. The most pt interaction they have, really, is transporting Pts to another floor (ie antepartum or postpartum).

A nurse manager may be concerned that someone with doula training might want to try to be in the rooms, breathing with the Pt, rubbing her back, etc, and while that sounds great (and is, I'm sure) it's not what she is being hired to do.

To the OP-get your doula training, and put it to use--as a doula, not ob tech. Forget about your resume, the experiences you will get will be well worth any time or effort involved for you personally, if you are really drawn to pregnancy/birth.

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