Hope this is the right area... anyone in Lactation?

  1. Not real sure if this is the right area to put this or not, LOL.
    I am still a student now, but want to go into lactation.
    We have a local hospital that is only for women and the lactation dept there is GREAT!
    I was able to nurse my twins until they self weaned at *almost* 3!! Thanks to the ladies there!
    The nurses at our hospital said they all started in Mother/ Baby for X amount of time and then additional hours of classes.
    Is anyone here in lactation? What do you dislike about it? What is your favorite aspect of it? Do you have someone available 24/ 7?

    Thanks!
  2. Visit gentlemother profile page

    About gentlemother

    Joined: May '05; Posts: 16; Likes: 2

    10 Comments

  3. by   laurik
    I too am interested in possibly becoming a lactation consultant after I finish my nursing degree and getting some experience. Most lactation consultants in my area are IBCLC certified (International Board Certified Lactation Consultant). The website is pretty good. http://www.iblce.org/
    Good luck to you.
  4. by   hospitalstaph
    IMO, the most difficult part is going to be working with women who do not want to and do not see any value in nursing past one (or even 6 months). I also think that the amount of time that you have available to work with each mother is limited. (please anyone correct me if I am wrong). I dread the day that someone tells me "No I don't want to bf, that's gross"

    Tracy
  5. by   gentlemother
    Quote from L&Dsomeday
    IMO, the most difficult part is going to be working with women who do not want to and do not see any value in nursing past one (or even 6 months). I also think that the amount of time that you have available to work with each mother is limited. (please anyone correct me if I am wrong). I dread the day that someone tells me "No I don't want to bf, that's gross"

    Tracy
    Yes and no, of course, this is only my experience as a PATIENT!
    I was in the hospital 3 days with my twins, which were born on a Saturday (I think, LOL). There was not a "main" lactation nurse there specifically for that on the weekends, although one happened to be there on the floor- does that make any sense?
    Now, on Monday there was a nurse there ONLY for lactation visits.

    Also, I was able to go back to the hospital at anytime Mon- Fri business hrs to the lactation dept to see someone and have the babies weighed and what not. I went OFTEN! And called often! To the point that if they hadn't heard from me by noon they called me! LOL (Hope I wasn't a PITA patient, lol). So, hospital time is limited and if a mom isn't able/ willing to go back in or to call then time is really limited. But if someone is willing to get the support, I would hope it would be available to them.

    Yeah, I would/ will be bummed out by a mother saying bf is gross and that they didn't want to do it. At the same time there are MANY struggles that can come up with it! And it helps to have someone to help you through them!
    (I think I'm turning into an activist, LOL)

    Thanks!
    Last edit by gentlemother on May 1, '05 : Reason: Horrid typo's
  6. by   BETSRN
    Quote from L&Dsomeday
    IMO, the most difficult part is going to be working with women who do not want to and do not see any value in nursing past one (or even 6 months). I also think that the amount of time that you have available to work with each mother is limited. (please anyone correct me if I am wrong). I dread the day that someone tells me "No I don't want to bf, that's gross"

    Tracy
    I think one of the most important parts of being a lactation consultant is being able to accept the fact that there are a lot of woman who do NOT want to breastfeed for a variety of reasons. You just have top get past that anad concentrate on the ones who do.

    The education we give is valuable, of course. But you are not going to convinve everyone and the sooner you understand that, the less frustrated you will be!

    I have been in maternal/child health for over 15 years now and I have just received my IBCLC. There are a lot of requirements and you have to never stop learning. Good luck.
  7. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from BETSRN
    I think one of the most important parts of being a lactation consultant is being able to accept the fact that there are a lot of woman who do NOT want to breastfeed for a variety of reasons. You just have top get past that anad concentrate on the ones who do.

    The education we give is valuable, of course. But you are not going to convinve everyone and the sooner you understand that, the less frustrated you will be!

    I have been in maternal/child health for over 15 years now and I have just received my IBCLC. There are a lot of requirements and you have to never stop learning. Good luck.
    Good post. I've had women refuse for many different reasons and you just have to respect their wishes.

    From a mom who breastfed her kids into toddlerhood . . .

    steph
  8. by   Tolleylama
    You can make a difference in many mothers lives. I am an IBCLC RN, BAN nurse. I run our lactation department. It has been a wonderful job. The best way you can prepare is to attend educational offerings, read Milk, money and madness. get a great resource book La Leche League- The Breastfeeding ANSWER BOOK( at amazon.com) become as educated as possible, and if your lucky find a mentor. I have been a RN for the last 33 years and the last 25 have been in OB. I started our lactation program in 1991 and We are now the only certified Baby Friendly hospital in Illinois.
    Last edit by Tolleylama on May 3, '05
  9. by   hospitalstaph
    Quote from Tolleylama
    You can make a difference in many mothers lives. I am an IBCLC RN, BAN nurse. I run our lactation department. It has been a wonderful job. The best way you can prepare is to attend educational offerings, read Milk, money and madness. get a great resourse book La Leche League- The Breastfeeding ANSWER BOOK( at amazon.com) become as educated as possible, and if your lucky find a mentor. I have been a RN for the last 33 years and the last 25 have been in OB. I started our lactation program in 1991 and We are now the only certified Baby Friendly hospital in Illinois.
    Yes, you must read Milk, Money, and Madness. The Ultimate Breastfeeding Book of Answers (Jack Newman, Teresa Pittman) is also great. You may also get in touch with LLL in your area (although I suspect you are since you nursed to toddlerhood). I cannot think of too many LLL Leaders that would not love to strike up a friendship and give you a few pointers about what they see AFTER the moms leave the hospital. Oh and I also recommend Selling Out Mothers and Babies by Marsha Walker. Fantastic book! Best of luck to you!

    Tracy
  10. by   BETSRN
    Quote from L&Dsomeday
    Yes, you must read Milk, Money, and Madness. The Ultimate Breastfeeding Book of Answers (Jack Newman, Teresa Pittman) is also great. You may also get in touch with LLL in your area (although I suspect you are since you nursed to toddlerhood). I cannot think of too many LLL Leaders that would not love to strike up a friendship and give you a few pointers about what they see AFTER the moms leave the hospital. Oh and I also recommend Selling Out Mothers and Babies by Marsha Walker. Fantastic book! Best of luck to you!

    Tracy
    Marsha walker is an excellent speaker, by the way. I have been to two different conferences where she has been a speaker.
  11. by   mitchsmom
    Quote from Tolleylama
    You can make a difference in many mothers lives. I am an IBCLC RN, BAN nurse. I run our lactation department. It has been a wonderful job. The best way you can prepare is to attend educational offerings, read Milk, money and madness. get a great resource book La Leche League- The Breastfeeding ANSWER BOOK( at amazon.com) become as educated as possible, and if your lucky find a mentor. I have been a RN for the last 33 years and the last 25 have been in OB. I started our lactation program in 1991 and We are now the only certified Baby Friendly hospital in Illinois.
    (OT on Baby-Friendly)
    Oh, that is really cool, that must have been very satisfying for you to become Baby-Friendly! I just did a lit review on Baby-Friendly (on the lit since about 1998-9) for my research class. I was thinking of submitting it to the Journal of Human Lactation except I really don't have the time to hone it any more right now!! (I just sent in my application to sit the IBCLC exam this July in addition to being in a BSN program & having three little ones at home)

    Has it made positive changes in your unit? What were the main obstacles to implementation for you? Is everyone pretty much on board / do you ever have problems with compliance? I would love to hear more details about your experience with it!!
    Last edit by mitchsmom on May 5, '05
  12. by   Tolleylama
    First I think it is great that you researched this topic. It was a process that took us five years to implement. I feel the most difficult portion was to gather support from nurses that were not uptodate on current evidenced based research. I had one night nurse go to the administrator of our hospital and infomr him "Babies would be dying in the rooms" if we let them stay in the rooms all night. I gladly report that it did not happen. Mothers love having their infants within their reach. We have increased our breastfeeding rates from 48% to 72%. We always tell people we are a work in progress. Everyday there are new challenges but we struggle on.

    Janet RNC, BAN, IBCLC,CD(DONA)

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