US RN looking to work in UK -- ER - page 2

Hey! I'm a BSN and BS prepared RN with 2 years emergency department experience looking into working in the UK in the ER (as is my preferred specialty), and I have a few questions. Any and all help... Read More

  1. by   GrumpyRN
    What you have done there is list the nursing tasks/duties that we do in ED.

    We do not have respiratory therapists so ED nurses set up BiPAP/CPAP/Ventilators.

    ABG's is unit dependent, some nurses will, some nurses won't.

    Nurses in the UK can suture, not just NP's.

    Drugs are drugs. Each ED will have a stock of what they use and access to the ones they use less often. Nurses are expected to know all the drugs used. Would also be expected to give suggestions to docs.

    When it comes to codes anyone can do CPR, only someone trained in ALS would defibrillate although if using an AED it is irrelevant who presses the button. As you say, ALS, TNCC, ATLS etc. are standard.

    The one thing nurses don't do is listen to bowel/chest/heart sounds. This is a medical exam and not part of the nursing assessment. You would be expected to document SOB.

    Chest tubes - yep, we do that too, and look after the drain.

    Not sure what you are trying to say here but I don't see any great differences in UK and US from what you write.
  2. by   Nrsing101
    I worked as a RN in the UK but i am now in the US. to cut it short, you will do "hands on" in the uk like cleaning nappies without masks! Cleaning the room, serving tea. YES, THAT IS A REGISTERED NURSE. And you will lose your skill even as simple as documentation because they are simply narrating it.. doesnt matter if it is not medically appropriate words like HAPPY. Stethoscope isnt used regularly. Basically, RN job there is very limited to being like Florence Nightingale. There is more autonomy in the US and higher technology. This is the truth.. i tell you, no mask except for patients with PTB.
  3. by   GrumpyRN
    Quote from Nrsing101
    I worked as a RN in the UK but i am now in the US. to cut it short, you will do "hands on" in the uk like cleaning nappies without masks! Cleaning the room, serving tea. YES, THAT IS A REGISTERED NURSE. And you will lose your skill even as simple as documentation because they are simply narrating it.. doesnt matter if it is not medically appropriate words like HAPPY. Stethoscope isnt used regularly. Basically, RN job there is very limited to being like Florence Nightingale. There is more autonomy in the US and higher technology. This is the truth.. i tell you, no mask except for patients with PTB.
    You understand that this is a discussion about ED nurses don't you?

    What is it with the masks?

    Cleaning patients and making sure they are hydrated is called basic care. Possibly THE most important part of being a nurse. What is wrong with being "hands on."
    The UK has a 4 hour target to admit/discharge ED patients so your exposure to having to cleanse patients is limited. (Yes I am aware that we have had a horrendous winter with longer waiting times).

    We have discussed autonomy earlier in the thread.

    See my reply to Gus_RN above, he has compiled a list of tasks that ED nurses do in the US but are also done in the UK so I'm not sure where the deskilling you mention comes from.
  4. by   skylark
    Quote from Nrsing101
    I worked as a RN in the UK but i am now in the US. to cut it short, you will do "hands on" in the uk like cleaning nappies without masks! Cleaning the room, serving tea. YES, THAT IS A REGISTERED NURSE. And you will lose your skill even as simple as documentation because they are simply narrating it.. doesnt matter if it is not medically appropriate words like HAPPY. Stethoscope isnt used regularly. Basically, RN job there is very limited to being like Florence Nightingale. There is more autonomy in the US and higher technology. This is the truth.. i tell you, no mask except for patients with PTB.

    What utter tosh!

    Since moving to the US I have deskilled because I no longer -
    set up CPAP or BiPAP
    suture wounds
    apply plaster casts
    do my own ECGs
    Assess pressure areas, hydration and nutritional status in the context of washing a patient
    Perform holistic care
    And why would you wear a mask to change a diaper? Seriously?

    The "technology" that you refer to in the US is actually the same monitoring and IV pumps that we had in the UK in the 90s. The CPAP and BiPAP is even older!

    If you don't want to care for patients, then don't be a nurse.
    If you just want to play with "technology" and do charting then find a new career.



    I'm sure your team in the UK is much happier without Mrs "Too Posh To Wash" slowing them down.

    I loved working ER in the UK but it has zero job satisfaction in the US as all we do is blood draws and give meds.
  5. by   kaitfinder
    Quote from skylark
    What utter tosh!

    Since moving to the US I have deskilled because I no longer -
    set up CPAP or BiPAP
    suture wounds
    apply plaster casts
    do my own ECGs
    Assess pressure areas, hydration and nutritional status in the context of washing a patient
    Perform holistic care
    And why would you wear a mask to change a diaper? Seriously?

    The "technology" that you refer to in the US is actually the same monitoring and IV pumps that we had in the UK in the 90s. The CPAP and BiPAP is even older!

    If you don't want to care for patients, then don't be a nurse.
    If you just want to play with "technology" and do charting then find a new career.



    I'm sure your team in the UK is much happier without Mrs "Too Posh To Wash" slowing them down.

    I loved working ER in the UK but it has zero job satisfaction in the US as all we do is blood draws and give meds.
    I'd say the only thing we don't do in the US skill-wise from the list you've mentioned is suturing. The rest depends on what facility you work at. I do my own EKGs, assess skin integrity, monitor hydration, clean/wash patients as necessary. We do have respiratory therapists in my personal ED who assist with setting up BiPap but when they're unavailable or it's emergent (as it often is), it's up to the nurse to manage it. We also don't do plaster casts in our ED, using soft-to-hard casts w/ ortho referral. Our tech is horrendously old though, in the facility I work in, that's for sure.

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