Nursing in the UK

Posted
by USnurse USnurse (New) New

You are reading page 7 of Nursing in the UK. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

VA_CCRC

VA_CCRC

24 Posts

I am presently working as an RN in the US. In the future I may be interested in relocating to the UK. I possess an Associate's Degree in Nursing. Would I need to return to school to work in the UK or is there some sort of reciprocity? Any info would be helpful...Thanks

donmurray

donmurray

837 Posts

http://www.nmc-uk.org

This is a link to the UK nurses' registraton body website Click on the overseas applicant section.

gwenhyfar

gwenhyfar

20 Posts

I am presently working as an RN in the US. In the future I may be interested in relocating to the UK. I possess an Associate's Degree in Nursing. Would I need to return to school to work in the UK or is there some sort of reciprocity? Any info would be helpful...Thanks

I recently was approved to work in the UK as an RN1 - don't know what the 1 means, but if you want to work there as an ADN nurse, it is possible, but get started early, and have all your documentation ready - course descriptions, contact the NMC and get your papers going, and be ready to pay. The exchange rate varies, and a credit card is necessary.

It is a long, drawn-out process, and I understand why - they want qualified nurses as much as the US does.

If you are interested in more, let me know.

Gwenhyfar

Karen30

Karen30

66 Posts

HI

I am assuming that the 1 indicates that you are a first level registered nurse.

lagaillarde

lagaillarde

10 Posts

hello

i am an american with duel nationality (french also). i spent most of my life living in the usa. i worked five years as a nurse aide; then went to college, recieved my associate degree in nursing and worked three years in the usa. last december after the emergency birth of my son i moved here to france with my husband in hopes of working here as a nurse after about a year or so. i figured i would take a year off to be with my son, learn the language in the process and then see about working here. the problem though is my language skills have improved but i still do not read or write french. i also checked into working as a nurse here and the american diploma is not the same as the french. i will have to take an exam and depending on the score of the exam go to school here for one to three years. another option is that my american diploma is the same as the english diploma all i have to do is register with the NMC; that is it. After I will be able to work anywhere in europe because england is part of the european community so the english diploma works in europe; then i will just need to speak the language which is a job with in itself!!!

if anyone has any information that might be of help as far as work in england, the best areas, pay in england , nmc how long it takes etc. it will be of great help. also anyone working in france or planning too let me know if you have any information.

thanks

michelle lagaillarde

gwenhyfar

gwenhyfar

20 Posts

Just go to the NMC website, and you can get started. If you want specifics, it is hard to give them. It took me about 4 months to hear after I submitted my credentials. It took a while to get the packet - about 4 weeks after I asked for the initial packet.

There are lots of websites, but unless you are very familiar with the EU terminology, it is hard to figure out.

Good luck, email if I can be of more help.

gwenhyfar

gwenhyfar

20 Posts

HI

I am assuming that the 1 indicates that you are a first level registered nurse.

What is a first level RN? Does that just mean brand new, starting at the beginning? Or does it take into account the 20+ years of experience I have?

Thanks for the help.

Jast

Jast

9 Posts

RN 1, means you are a registered general nurse. It does not refer to your years of experience. There are different numbers for midwives and psychiatric nurses etc.

gwenhyfar

gwenhyfar

20 Posts

RN 1, means you are a registered general nurse. It does not refer to your years of experience. There are different numbers for midwives and psychiatric nurses etc.

Thank you!

EarthAngel

EarthAngel

49 Posts

There is and always will be a difference in practice between al countries of the world. Every country and every area within any given country has different needs in regards to nursing and therefore nurses are trained to cater (for lack of a better word) to the needs of his or her patients. I have never worked as a nurse in the UK, but having lived over seas extensively, most of my encounters with nursing staff from the patient perspective have been with UK, particularly British, trained nurses. They inspired me to want to become a nurse, and to become a midwife, a goal I am still working toward.

Here in the US, I feel that nurses are under more pressure-from legal stand points, such as, if anything goes wrong, you are guilty until proven innocent, and even then, you are reprimanded and could very likely lose your job. Nurses in the US very seldom recieve acknowledgement of their dedication and hard work-from patients, co-workers, superiors or anyone! Which may tend to make them more ...vocal.. about their knowledge or achievements. I dont know what its like for a UK nurse when it comes to that sort of things, but when patients are screaming lawsuit every two seconds, (like here in the US) I think UK nurses are better able to focus on the care they give and have a closer relationship with their patients as a result (less fear=better care?) Just an idea. Please dont flame. Im just the type that tries to look at both sides of the coin at the same time.

Im not defending one country or another. This thread wasnt started, I dont believe, to flame anyone, but out of curiousity and maybe the perspective of one broadening their experiences around the world of nursing. We as nurses need to learn from one another and accept that we are human and as humans will make mistakes and will never know EVERYthing. Especially in such a dynamic pratice as healthcare.

Peace to all.

pej11uk

pej11uk

10 Posts

greetings from england!

it's really amusing to read this thread as people are trying to outdo each other by maligning one another. i originally thought that people went to take up nursing as a career because they want to care for people who needed it. and the people who are recipients of that care do not really care whether you are trained in the US or UK or wherever, as long as you have a caring attitude and you know what you are doing, that is all that matters. but i will continue reading as i find it really entertaining.

As regards you queries, may i first tell you that i was trained in asia, my nursing training patterned after that of the US but is now practicing here in the UK. I am currently working in the NHS, and to tell you honestly, at first i was not impressed - equipments wise -as back home i have used more advanced equipments. But nursing is not knowing how to use the most modern equipments, it is about being conscientious of the care you are giving another person. this is now my fifth year in the UK as a nurse.

I am currently working in an infectious diseases unit - very interesting. I am respected by my colleagues for the knowledge that i am sharing with them and in return, they are happy showing me the way they do things. I am very fortunate to be working in a a very multi-culturally diverse unit, where everyone's contribution in the care of a patient is well appreciated. Whether the collegial relationship is vertical or horizontal, the multi-disciplinary team work together to achieve its purpose - to make the patient better.

It is entirely up to the person whether they wanted to grow or remain stagnant in their post. i can say that opportunities are always available to better yourself, and the support is always there.

Of course you may encounter the most horrible colleagues and patients, but if you are true to your calling, then i guess you can use that experience as way to improve yourself.

i hope you'll have a great time when you become a full-pledged nurse. and please, be a good nurse.

:rotfl:

Greetings!

Wow, this whole US/UK issue is a heated subject. I will assume that any situation depends on your expecations and what you make of it. I remain openminded on the subject.

Anyway, to my questions :p

I am a Nursing student in the US and my long range plans include spending a couple of years (or possibly more) over in the UK.

I would like to get a general idea of the atmosphere of the health profession in the UK and the working environments for RN's.

Is there room for growth in responsilbity and pay? Meaning if you really apply yourself and acquire more responsilbity, can you grow professionally as well?

Is the field respected in the UK?

Are there many nurses who specialize in particular areas (infectious disease, oncology, etc.)?

Which area do you think has the best working enviroment? Public, private? Institutional hospitals or small practices?

What is the general relationships between nurses and doctors? Who is doing most of the care and evaluation?

Thanks so much.

liza tamkin

liza tamkin

7 Posts

Hello there would love to be able to help I work in a general ICU and I trained in canada. I have seen both sides of the fence and I am quite happy to nurse here in the UK. email me if you like and we can have a better chat. But the best advise that you have is this " go into this new adventure with an open mind, expect there to be diffrences but don't constantly compare. be positive and you will do just fine. your new workplace will learn alot about you by the way that you take CARE of your patient... We do everything on my unit with regards to personal care and we take pride in the fact that we have time to wash our patients hair and put curlers in upon occasion... It is a two way street with regards to international nursing. both parties learn from each other as long as you all keep an open mind!!

I'm moving to UK in 2005. Can an ICU nurse from UK help me plan ahead on transitioning to NHS system of 'doing things'? I am currently working on licensure through the NMC. I have soooo many questions and would love to hear from someone currently working Intensive Care.
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.