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Nursing teacher caught calling students "dirty little liars" and "dirty dirty dogs"

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What are your thoughts about this?

Nursing instructor recorded calling students "little ***" and "dirty little rats"

I am not a nursing student at the University of Minnesota (so I do not know what happened after the incident occurred or all the details), but I attend a nursing school in Minnesota and I know firsthand what it is like to have instructors who I wonder why went into the teaching profession in the first place.

When I started nursing school, many have warned me that "Nurses Eat Their Young”. And as a nursing student, I have seen this a lot with many instructors. While there are nurses who I believe are compassionate and really do love to teach, help, encourage their students (you guys are awesome!), many are not this way.

They think fear, intimidation, constant criticism, and belittling is how you should teach future nurses. There is this nurse Youtuber (Nurse Blake) who started a "Nurses Support Their Young" campaign awhile back. And I agree, why can't ALL nurses support their young?

What matters to me is how they interact with students, answer questions, an grade assignments.  If they are fair, professional, and available, then that is what is important.

Make no mistake, teaching is hard and students as a whole are frustrating.  Teachers are human too, and unloading on colleagues to blow off steam is a part of stress relief for pretty much all of humanity, especially in 2020.  

I’ve spent the the last several years trying to correct this behavior in myself - to not talk crap about people who frustrate me, but it’s hard and I fail regularly.

 

On 10/24/2020 at 11:46 PM, healthcareforall said:

When I started nursing school, many have warned me that "Nurses Eat Their Young”.

I really wouldn't focus on this. There's no point to it and in general I wish people would move on from it and pleasantly-assertively expect the best from others instead of beginning with a negative idea that therefore appears to be confirmed as soon as some fellow human being makes a mistake or reveals an imperfection.

Besides, if anyone is getting eaten it's less an elder-younger thing and more likely just that this is a difficult profession and a difficult job with high levels of general stress found in many of the positions.

Now, true, if I were a student in this course (and especially if I wasn't pleased with how it was being delivered/managed) I certainly would not be happy with this and would expect some remediation of this instructor with regard to customer service and the actual Code of Ethics.

I think the spheres of academia in America tend to be quite informal. Therein stems the lack of mutual respect between students who are often unencumbered with accountability and teachers who are devoid of utmost professionalism.  

Edited by cynical-RN

ADN2DNP, ADN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Emergency/Urgent Care. Has 6 years experience.

Interestingly, I haven't had these experiences where I felt bullied by my instructors however I have experienced other nursing students get bullied by instructors. I think that because I'm a male this had something to do with it, as my female classmates reported bullying from professors a lot. What I have noticed, however, is that some of these professors have no business in teaching as they are way behind the times in terms of practice or just simply do not understand a topic they are covering.

I think that this is why I want to become a nursing professor, I just simply want to provide students a better education then I had obtained. You do have to be the change you want to see in your profession.

ThursdayNight, CNA

Specializes in Wiping tears. Has 3 years experience.

On 10/24/2020 at 8:46 PM, healthcareforall said:

What are your thoughts about this?

Nursing instructor recorded calling students “little ***” and “dirty little rats”

I am not a nursing student at the University of Minnesota (so I do not know what happened after the incident occurred or all the details), but I attend a nursing school in Minnesota and I know firsthand what it is like to have instructors who I wonder why went into the teaching profession in the first place. When I started nursing school, many have warned me that "Nurses Eat Their Young”. And as a nursing student, I have seen this a lot with many instructors. While there are nurses who I believe are compassionate and really do love to teach, help, encourage their students (you guys are awesome!), many are not this way. They think fear, intimidation, constant criticism, and belittling is how you should teach future nurses. There is this nurse Youtuber (Nurse Blake) who started a "Nurses Support Their Young" campaign awhile back. And I agree, why can't ALL nurses support their young?


That's in every profession. I ate a few before, but I was younger than they were. LOL.

Edited by ThursdayNight

lincoln77, RN

Specializes in Corrections/psych. Has 9 years experience.

On 11/2/2020 at 1:52 PM, ADN2DNP said:

Interestingly, I haven't had these experiences where I felt bullied by my instructors however I have experienced other nursing students get bullied by instructors. I think that because I'm a male this had something to do with it, as my female classmates reported bullying from professors a lot. What I have noticed, however, is that some of these professors have no business in teaching as they are way behind the times in terms of practice or just simply do not understand a topic they are covering.

I think that this is why I want to become a nursing professor, I just simply want to provide students a better education then I had obtained. You do have to be the change you want to see in your profession.

yes, many of my instructors really didn't seem like they knew what they were talking about.

There is an element though of nursing being a grave responsibility.  If an instructor sees student who seem to not take that seriously I seems appropriate to not let it slide. In other fields, it may not cost someone their life if someone is a slacker, so maybe the instructors feel more detached.