New grad worried about getting a job.

  1. Hello my name is Susanna.
    I am a recent new grad, that used different types of accommodations throughout my first degree in psychology and for my second degree in nursing. Such as a reader, and dictation. My road of becoming a nurse has been a different and difficult adventure. I'm proud to say that I have passed NCLEX. Now it's time for me to look for a job. I'm becoming more worried that I might not be hireable due to the fact that I might need reading and writing accommodations even more afraid but this dream and hard work of being a nurse is not possible anymore.
    I just spoke to someone from ANA, and wishing me luck for finding an employer that would be willing to purchase such needs to allow me to work could be unlikely. I'm extremely disappointed and hurt all over again just like I was told during nursing school, as unlikely I will pass my classes and be a nurse. Now I'm being told it's unlikely for me find a job. I'm wondering if there our current working nurses that use accommodations such as dictation or reading on the nursing floor? I know I can't let these others get me down it's really hard. Is there anyone out there in the state of Arizona use this type accommodations or is it's just not possible. I know and the state of California things are much better I don't want to leave my family here to live out my dreams of becoming a nurse. I love to help those, and I have seen and experience the love of caring for others in the nursing field is unbelievably wonderful something that is priceless I want to be part of.
    Any advice for those nurses out there in the real world on the nursing floor that use these types of accommodations and that it is possible.
    Anyone....

    Thank you,
    Susanna
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  2. Visit Sah275 profile page

    About Sah275, BSN

    Joined: Jan '16; Posts: 3
    from AZ , US
    Specialty: 1 year(s) of experience

    5 Comments

  3. by   Here.I.Stand
    This is the issue I see with all of the accommodations that schools are required to provide... Since many would not be considered "reasonable" for the practicing RN, I really don't think it does students any favors to allow them for school.

    I don't mean you in particular -- I don't know you or your abilities.

    What did you do for clinical during school? We're you at all able to manage clinicals without a lexical assistant, or did you have one there too?
  4. by   Sah275
    I can understand that that the some accommodations are not realistic for the real world.

    I was lucky I did not use or request any accommodations during my clinical experience while during school.
    The only thing I would use is spell checker for my nurses notes. And the nurse that was my preceptor for each clinical day, I would be will to let me ask if I was readings omitting correctly. I know the many doctors use dictation for their notes, but can nurses these types of resources?

    Thank you for your questions Here I Stand.
  5. by   RNpathoteacher
    As a nursing professor, there is a difference between school and work. Most charting is clicks now. Spelling does count when typing. Reading a patient's chart with accuracy is important. IF you did not use accommodations with clinicals, will you really need them working as a nurse? I feel sad that you have conquered school and NCLEX and might not be able to work.
  6. by   Sah275
    Hello RNpathoteacher,

    I think you are correct, there is a very good chance I wont need accommodations. Now finding a job for a new grad RN is difficult as well. I really hope I can get a job and hopefully not have to use accommodations. Thank you for replying back to my post. I really appreciate it!
    Thanks!
  7. by   hppygr8ful
    Haven't you heard


    UCHealth, which operates nine acute-care hospitals and more than 100 clinics across Colorado, Wyoming, and Nebraska, currently has 330 openings for registered nurses. Since the nonprofit health system can't find all the nurses it needs locally, it has been seeking out candidates from other states -- and sometimes other countries.


    It's all in where you look.

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