aspergers - page 2

So i just found out i have symtoms of aspergers. What i want to know is can a nurse with aspergers make it in the nursing field. And has anyone worked with a nurse with aspergers.... Read More

  1. by   Retired APRN
    I hope this isn't going to sound too ignorant, but I was wondering if a nurse with Asperger's would possibly be more successful in a specialty with less highly charged patient interaction. I'm thinking PACU, outpatient clinics, maybe industrial health and safety... Or am I really off base with that?
  2. by   jose2010
    Update:
    Sorry it has taken me soooo long to update u all but was not diagnosed with as but with social anxiety.... Im working closely with a therapist one a week.. Its helps out....
  3. by   Retired APRN
    I'm so glad you're getting treatment that is helpful! Thank you for bringing us up to date, and hang in there.
  4. by   Aspie
    I think there are way too many folks with AS now and because of that empathy concept was included into the curricula, lol

    I'm finishing the nursing school and have had many struggles. Group work sucks balls! Especially because English is not my native language. But I just learned a lot about non-verbals and social norms and trying to fit in. Takes a lot of energy. Sometimes I get so exhausted that I relax and become awkward again. Then I call myself Sheldon Cooper

    Everything is possible, but it will be very draining... I will try to get into the research field, get Master's Degree and find something with less social interactions.

    Or get a NICU speciality. I know that there I will have to talk to parents. but at least it will be meaningful, not just stupid chit-chat.
  5. by   katren22
    Just curious, what career did you end up going into? I'm in the same boat right now. Just got diagnosed with mild aspergers, looking to change careers. Nursing has been so stressful!! I haven't fit in anywhere. I've worked at 3 different places in a 9 year span of time. I'm thinking about doing medical coding.
  6. by   Catlady77
    I have never been officially diagnosed but I have many of the symptoms but I always knew I wanted to be a nurse because I like to help other people , caring for the sick seems to come naturally for me and I have always had a strong interest in medical issues and how the body functions I worked as a nurse aide for 13 years and have been a nurse for almost nine years I love what I do I may not go to staff parties or do a lot of socializing but I figure I am there for the patients not to socialize anyway so if you feel nursing is your calling go for it and stick to your plans don't pay attention to what others say or think I can't think of myself doing any other line of work
  7. by   Catlady77
    Do what you feel is right in your heart
  8. by   smartnurse1982
    Working nights has been best for me.

    I notice many nurses expect other nurses to have an outgoing attitude and speak about their personal life,
    but feel that is a recipe for disaster.

    2Most nurses that i work with seem to think an introverted nurse has no compassion and is a bad thing.

    I will say the patients and the parents love me,it is just i have problems with coworkers.
  9. by   pinkiepieRN
    Quote from smartnurse1982
    Working nights has been best for me.

    I notice many nurses expect other nurses to have an outgoing attitude and speak about their personal life,
    but feel that is a recipe for disaster.

    2Most nurses that i work with seem to think an introverted nurse has no compassion and is a bad thing.

    I will say the patients and the parents love me,it is just i have problems with coworkers.
    Working nights definitely helps. The pace is slower, the teamwork is better and the team is more cohesive. I'm more extroverted in my personal life and sometimes say things that cause me to insert my foot in my mouth but I try to keep things quiet at work.
  10. by   Crystal-Wings
    Same here! I work nights in home health and it is definately better for me because I only have to focus on my patient and don't have to worry about dealing with any co-workers. The only people I deal with are his mom for the most part, and she's super nice and understanding. I sometimes wish I could work in LTC or a hospital, but I know it would be to stressful for me, and I'm scared I'd get fired, so I'm happy where I am for now.
  11. by   artistic.injections
    Go into Aesthetics. My Aspie quirks are helpful here. Im an Aesthetic Nurse Injector specializing in Botox, Dermal Fillers, and Kybella. I have an amazing eye for symmetry and contour that normals can't compete with.. My bluntness is essential to telling my patients hard truths; although I have learned and improved a lot about how to "nice things up". My patients love their results and it makes them loyal so they come and spend money so I have a little bit of leverage at work. They love my truthful backstory, that I'm an artist and injectables are my medium. This is helpful when my Aspie quirks rear their head with coworkers.
    I'm not going to sugar coat this, my uncompromising unilateral approach to things isn't always a winner with coworkers so I try to capitalize on my strengths; my passion for my work, my diligence, my skill set, the way I analyze my market.

    Learn to embrace your flaws and turn them into strengths. I couldn't manage a support group but I joined a site called WrongPlanet.net and it helped to be able to connect with other people like me from the comfort of my couch. I've also read a ton of books on interpersonal relationships, body language, and sales and I've made it my little game to charm the people (patients & coworkers) I interact with, even if it didn't come naturally initially.

    Make time for the things that center you. I like to cuddle with my animals, work out, and paint. Aspergers is a delicate balance. Bolster yourself with plenty of sleep, activities that center you, and a healthy diet. Check google for supplementation advice. If you can't stay organized and that is wrecking havoc you may want to talk to a psychiatrist about medication that can help. But first things first, get a good nights sleep! An unrested Aspie is a terror!
  12. by   carenurse_
    Hi Teasaidh,

    What did you choose instead to go into after you finish you BSN degree?
  13. by   hppygr8ful
    I am not on the spectrum but my husband is. He works in technology and engineering. I would think a nurse with a higher degree on the spectrum would do very well in some sort of nursing research.

    Hppy

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