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Nurses with Anxiety?

Nurses   (395 Views | 5 Replies)

Nursewholovesplanners has 8 years experience as a LPN.

331 Profile Views; 2 Posts

I'm sure this question has been asked multiple times but,

Are there any nurses who suffer from work related anxiety?

I have been an LPN for about 7 years. I spent half of my career in the nursing resource team so mostly med-surg and currently in an outpatient setting.

I'm finding myself triple and quadruple checking things even though I already know it's correct. I know there's nothing wrong with that but it kinda comes off a little self-doubtish.

What are your coping techniques with work related anxiety? How do you learn to separate work from home so it doesn't spill into your home and personal life?

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OUxPhys has 4 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Cardiology.

835 Posts; 9,751 Profile Views

Oh yeah. I have anxiety just in general. At work I did what you did: check things 3-4 times even though I know its fine. Really the best thing is to put trust in yourself. As for anxiety outside of work I try to find things to keep me occupied. 

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2 Followers; 857 Posts; 5,566 Profile Views

Try making a list of your duties so you can check them off as you go and save yourself time and stress from checking behind yourself multiple times.

I separated work from home by leaving home at the door on my way in and work where it is on my way out. The only exception is getting a call from my children or their schools saying they needed to be picked up, etc. My family and their schools knew it better be life threatening or somebody better be damn near dead to call me on my job.

You have to train yourself to not take things personal and isolate situations that are personal so they don't affect you in other aspects of your life.

If you're having a hard time, maybe you need a staycation or talk to a therapist and get perspective or get things off your chest. If neither are options, have a real talk session with a friend or someone you trust so they can give you advice. I will caution to speak with someone who will give you advice that's best for you and will tell you the truth. You need to be told what you need to hear, not what you want to hear.

What has changed in your life that has caused you to be anxious? If you worked med-surg and have been a nurse for a while then you should be doing fine in outpatient. You have to think back to when your anxiety started and what may have triggered it.

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brownbook has 35 years experience.

1 Follower; 3,394 Posts; 46,109 Profile Views

I am not a psychiatrist, I only play one on TV :).  But your symptoms remind me of my best friend describing how she realized her daughter had obsessive compulsive disorder.   Usually OCD  manifests itself in the teen or young adult years...so hopefully I am totally wrong.

It wouldn't hurt to talk to your doctor IF this is beginning to interfere with your ability to function at work.

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TriciaJ has 39 years experience as a RN and specializes in Psych, Corrections, Med-Surg, Ambulatory.

14 Followers; 3,701 Posts; 38,514 Profile Views

5 hours ago, NurseBlaq said:

Try making a list of your duties so you can check them off as you go and save yourself time and stress from checking behind yourself multiple times.

I separated work from home by leaving home at the door on my way What has changed in your life that has caused you to be anxious? If you worked med-surg and have been a nurse for a while then you should be doing fine in outpatient. You have to think back to when your anxiety started and what may have triggered it.

I actually agree with this whole post.  I'll tell you what might be different between med-surg and outpatient:  in med-surg there is another shift coming on and hopefully they'll catch anything you might have missed.  In outpatient, you're sending them out the door.  If they subsequently have a negative outcome, you will be the last health care person to have seen them alive.

I know this sounds a bit extreme, but my last job was ambulatory care.  Even though it was technically "easier" than med-surg, I did cope with anxiety about possibly missing anything.

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2 Followers; 857 Posts; 5,566 Profile Views

8 hours ago, TriciaJ said:

I actually agree with this whole post.  I'll tell you what might be different between med-surg and outpatient:  in med-surg there is another shift coming on and hopefully they'll catch anything you might have missed.  In outpatient, you're sending them out the door.  If they subsequently have a negative outcome, you will be the last health care person to have seen them alive.

I know this sounds a bit extreme, but my last job was ambulatory care.  Even though it was technically "easier" than med-surg, I did cope with anxiety about possibly missing anything.

I never worked outpatient but I understand. Never thought about it that way.

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