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NP vs DNP

Posted

Hi, Everybody

so to start I am probably serious years before I will have my degree....

this is where I am and I am scared:

I have a bachelor of science in medical technology and next August I will go to an accelerated BSN. After 1 year and 9 months, I will get my BSN. Then after I will work around 1 year, I plan on going back to NP school.

Well, now this is the problem, I heard that NP's will have to get a doctorate, and just a masters does not suffice.

People tell me why don't you go to PA school. Simply because I cannot afford being on only one salary for 3 years for how long is PA school.

With all the nursing careers you can do school part time and is more doable.

But is there a chance that the only way I can become and NP is to do the DNP program?

Will the current NP's going to have to get a doctorate too?

well 1 year and 9 months to BSn, then 1-2 years work then np school would be part time 3 years or dnp program part time would be 4-6 years. I am talking 10 years!!!

I am only 27, but still I am so scared. what do you guys think?

BCgradnurse, MSN, RN, NP

Specializes in allergy and asthma, urgent care. Has 12 years experience.

Have you looked into Direct Entry NP programs? That way you can do your BSN and MSN (NP track) in one fell swoop. There is no consensus on whether a DNP will be mandatory for NP practice. Many schools are transitioning their NP programs from MSN to DNP programs in anticipation of this, but no one knows when or if a DNP will mandatory.

BTW- I also went into nursing with a BS in Medical Technology. All the lab stuff was very helpful in school and in practice. I did an accelerated Direct Entry program and was done in less than 3 years. I was 45 when I started.....

Did you go part time or full time? cause I am doing part time only....

oterwise I could do PA school and would only be 2.5 years, but in my situation I can't work at all. what did you do? which school did you go to?

anh06005, MSN, APRN, NP

Specializes in Cardiac, Home Health, Primary Care. Has 6 years experience.

Check with your state's board of nursing. Arkansas still says they have no plans to make a doctorate necessary for entry level NP.

BCgradnurse, MSN, RN, NP

Specializes in allergy and asthma, urgent care. Has 12 years experience.

Did you go part time or full time? cause I am doing part time only....

oterwise I could do PA school and would only be 2.5 years, but in my situation I can't work at all. what did you do? which school did you go to?

I wentcto school full time and worked part time. I made a lot of sacrifices to do this, but it was worth it. I went to Boston College. You can do the DE program part time and still finish in about 4 years.

My area doesn't offer it:(

BCgradnurse, MSN, RN, NP

Specializes in allergy and asthma, urgent care. Has 12 years experience.

Would it be worth it to relocate to find a DE program?

My own view is that it will be a LONG time before the NP boards require a DNP degree. This is the absolute wrong time to limit entry into the NP field, given the increased access provided by the Affordable Care Act and the growing recognition of NPs as physician extenders, particularly in primary care (shoot me if you don't like the term, that is what we are considered by physicians who do the hiring). The bigger issue is that many schools are eliminating their NP programs. Locally, the only two state NP school recently eliminated their NP programs and now have only DNP programs. There are several local private schools that have strong NP programs, but the tuition cost is prohibitive for many people. Instead, people are turning to on-line NP schools.

So my advice would be to finish your BSN and then look around and see what is available. You most likely will need and want to work 1-2 years as an RN anyway to figure out what kind of NP you want to be (and whether you want to be one at all). There are only about 10 direct-entry MSN programs that prepare you for the NP boards (as opposed to a generalist MSN) and it sounds like you'd have to locate. I am a big believer in one step at a time, especially if you are young and have the time.