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np school

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What is nurse practitioner program like. How does it compare to nursing school? What kind of questions do they ask you? What kind of training is it? Is it hard for lets say a nurse with 3 years of experience? Please share any insight it would be helpful. Please provide examples of a sample test question or a subject that you had to study and how you had to approach a situation. Thanks. Anything will help.

Edited by фpigeongangф

Thank God for Jack Daniels....

Thanks zenman that helped a lot when i get into the program i will make sure i will share with people that want to know what its like and what to be ready fore instead of talking about something irrelevant.

Edited by фpigeongangф

You probably forgot to do a search to find the other 789 posts just like yours. This is perhaps the reason for few responses to your post. But I shall give it a shot.

What is nurse practitioner program like?

Depends on your experience and your perspective as well as the school.

How does it compare to nursing school?

You study more advanced topics.

What kind of questions do they ask you?

At what point? Could be anything, such as, Could you please turn off the light switch so I can show these slides?”

What kind of training is it?

NP training. My training was in Psych. I've had other training but that's another story.

Is it hard for lets say a nurse with 3 years of experience?

Depends on many variables, but 3 years experience should help.

Please provide examples of a sample test question or a subject that you had to study and how you had to approach a situation.

You can look at school website to find their curriculum so you will know what you have to study. You approach any situation from that of a student shaking in their boots cause they feel like they know nothing.

Test question from basic neuroscience:

1. Differentiate G-protein-coupled receptors from ligand-gated receptors from voltage-sensitive ion channels.

Thank you that helped a lot now i know i have to start studying neuroscience in detail and psych drugs ahead of time so i get some knowledge and confidence. Prob will switch jobs to a psych unit in the area. Time to turn up.

Can you send a link where i can find what i should be familiar with before starting psychnp school? Should i buy a neuroscience book and read it? What else should i study? Can you provide a link to the 789 posts on what to expect fron psych np school?

BostonFNP, APRN

Specializes in Adult Internal Medicine. Has 10 years experience.

What is nurse practitioner program like. How does it compare to nursing school? What kind of questions do they ask you? What kind of training is it? Is it hard for lets say a nurse with 3 years of experience? Please share any insight it would be helpful. Please provide examples of a sample test question or a subject that you had to study and how you had to approach a situation. Thanks. Anything will help.

As zen has hinted there are lots of threads about this topic. There is also a lot of basic information out there about it on the web.

Graduate NP education is much different from undergrad RN education. You will cover familiar topics in much greater detail. NP school (should be)/is difficult and most of your colleagues will be from the top of their classes. Grades are typically held to a higher standard. Clinical preceptorships are far more critical. As far as how "hard" it will be for you, only you will know that answer.

You can brush up on physiology and pathophysiology: if you can understand the pathophysiology then you will have a much easier time in clinical practice as you will know what to look for and how to correct it. A working basic knowledge of pharmacology is also important, as least general classes of medications.

There are no more "NCLEX style" questions. Questions are typically direct and have a single right answer.

A sample graduate question:

The mechanism of action for the long-term antihypertensive effects of thiazide-type diuretics is which of the following:

1.) Reduction of intravascular volume.

2.) Reduction of preload and cardiac output via antagonism of adrenergic receptors.

3.) Reducing activation of the RAAS.

4.) Secondary relative reduction of TPR via vasodilation.

Sent from my iPhone.

BirkieGirl

Has 25 years experience.

i will be happy to give you some insight...NP school is tough. it's a LOT of info, in a fairly short amount of time, and generally unlike PA and medical students, EVERYONE there is already practicing in the field (RNs) so there is the work commitment to consider too. i am doing a 3/4 time program, hybrid (1/2 online, 1/2 brick/mortar), with two kids (pre-k and a tween), married, working an office 40 hr job and somehow, i am getting it all done. i LOVE the learning aspect of it though. I don't think 3 yrs is to little experience, as long as YOU feel like you have good experience. i know many nurses who comfortably feel like they can do it. i had to practice for a lot of years before i felt confident enough to have the knowledge background to actually do it well. but, that's just me!

depending on the program, you may have the option to go slower or faster, i know many people who took one class a semester for a while, then amped up to 2 then into a full time clinical. others can work weekends only and do a full time program.

the only real advice that i have is to really make sure this is the path you want. i think a lot of RNs think the NP route will get them a better schedule (maybe for some, but for me, i've been there 18 yrs and though it's 40 hrs, i make my schedule), more pay (true for MANY), for more stability (for ME, yes, but not for all). it is a HUGE commitment, and a lot of money, and a big chunk of your life that you really have to dedicate to the process if you want to be successful. good luck!

Thanks birkie girl. I hear you. I am motivated though i am 27 so i will prob work two more years in the meantime i will read neuroscience and then get the books that will be used in psych np program and read all of them ahead of time. I may have to work another year in addition or so but i think i will just be more confident and knowledgeable while in the program. I have 30 patients each day and all of them are polypharm so i give about 100-200 pills/patches/sprays a day. If i dont know something ima look em up and talk about them to my pts so i remember. I am ready to turn up and you are right we work as nurses and we learn in a way that other med students dont get to. My goal is to keep studying/learning until i knock out the pnp program and then work for a psych ward and work part time in a private practice then transition to a self owned private practice (i come from a family full of lawyers accountants and bussiness administrators and my mom is a software engineer) so i have a whole squad supporting me and a team of lawyers (my dad is a main lawyer that controls 6 other lawyers). They are excited to squad up with me and make sure the practice goes well. I just dont want to let them down so i got my head down in books and if it means i need more time then it is what it is. My pts and fellow nurses tell me i need to be a np and i dont even tell them thats my plan. Im staying humble and taking everyday as a learning experience.

Thank you boston for your post i would have to say a decrease in tpr. I am glad the questions are not going to be like nclex because rven though i passed first time w minimum questions i felt like there was the ridiculous qustion types about if a widow is crying do you hand her a tissue or tell her tell me more or schedule social worker visit. Im glad np school is not like that and only one right answer is available. birkiegirl i really hope everything goes well for you. I know your kids are the main motivators for you and after you graduate thay will be super proud. Peace.

Edited by фpigeongangф