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normal lab values

NCLEX   (7,428 Views | 11 Replies)
by pita80 pita80 (New) New

907 Profile Views; 14 Posts

I have different books and study guides but they all have different lab values.....for those of u who already took the nclex, which ones did u memorized???

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37 Posts; 2,175 Profile Views

Use one source and stick with it. Bottom line is the NCLEX isn't going to test whether or not you believe a sodium of 134 is hyponatremia. It'll be REALLY low on the exam like less than 125

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14 Posts; 907 Profile Views

Thank u!! That does make sense! Do we need to know just the basics or all of them!!,

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purplechicxiii has 8 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Derm, Plas, OB-GYNE & Internal Medicine.

429 Posts; 15,910 Profile Views

Thank u!! That does make sense! Do we need to know just the basics or all of them!!,

I made a draft of what lab values that are mostly asked, based on the Q & A I have answered:

Electrolytes (Na, Ca, K, Mg, Phosporous)

Blood Values (RBC, Hgb, Hct, PT, PTT, Clotting time, INR, WBC, Platelet, Neutrophils)

Thyroid Studies (T3, T4, FT4, TSH)

MI (Troponin I, Troponin T)

GI (Albumin, Ammonia, Amylase, Lipase, Bilirubin, Protein, Uric Acid)

Lipid Profile (LDH, HDH, Triglyceride)

Glucose (Fasting, FBS, HbA1C)

Renals (Creatinine, BUN, Urine Specific Gravity)

HIV (CD4 T-cells)

ABG Analysis (ph, pCO2, HCO3)

Toxicity Levels of certain drugs & their antidotes (Digoxin, Lithium, etc.)

Also, don't just memorize the values. But also, "what do they mean?" and "what you need to do if they are high or low/hyper or hypo?"

Hope this helps. :)

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NurseLoveJoy88 has 6 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in LTC.

3,959 Posts; 32,204 Profile Views

Potassium, potassium, potassium. Know this one especially for NCLEX.

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purplechicxiii has 8 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Derm, Plas, OB-GYNE & Internal Medicine.

429 Posts; 15,910 Profile Views

Thanks!! :))
You are welcome. When are you testing btw? :)

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14 Posts; 907 Profile Views

I graduated on December 2010, after that I had to do social service for six months and im still waiting for all my paperwork so i can apply !! i studied in Mexico :( ughhh big big mistake!! so i have no idea when im gonna be ready i hope this year i can give it a try!!

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purplechicxiii has 8 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Derm, Plas, OB-GYNE & Internal Medicine.

429 Posts; 15,910 Profile Views

Potassium, potassium, potassium. Know this one especially for NCLEX.
Must agree to that!Also, if I must say coz I sometimes got these two mixed up:Vitamin K is not Potassium (K)!!Vitamin K affects the clotting process and is affected by PTWhile, Potassium is an electrolyte. Affects the muscles - hyperkalemia, hypokalemia. Potassium Chloride is never given thru IV push.

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purplechicxiii has 8 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Derm, Plas, OB-GYNE & Internal Medicine.

429 Posts; 15,910 Profile Views

I graduated on December 2010, after that I had to do social service for six months and im still waiting for all my paperwork so i can apply !! i studied in Mexico :( ughhh big big mistake!! so i have no idea when im gonna be ready i hope this year i can give it a try!!
That's okay you can review on your free time. And when you already have your test date. You can start answering practice questions. Good luck! :)

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90 Posts; 4,559 Profile Views

It helped me to remember:

-Sodium = confusion

-Potassium = Heart and nerves

-Calcium = muscles (also remember that hypoparathyroidism looks like hypocalcemia and hyperparathyroidism looks like hypercalcemia)

-Magnesium = a smooth muscle relaxer (think bladder and diaphragm)

If you stop to think about what would happen if you have too much or too little based on what the electrolytes regulate, it should be helpful. It's always better to understand than memorize and I really think that's what NCLEX wants to see--that you know content and can apply what you know and think critically. Good luck!

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Nae856Nae has 10 years experience.

32 Posts; 1,579 Profile Views

Hello everyone!

Just wanted to say Im new to the forum and I would like to thank you ladies for sharing your info for the Nclex exam...Although most of you are RN's or future RN's, I find the information given a big help! I am currently scheduled to take my boards(Nclex-pn) and have been studying and using the resources from this site...

Any info offered will be greatly appreciated!

Thanks again Ladies! YOU ROCK!! :nurse:

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