Non Bedside Nursing

Posted
by MM008 (New) New

I have been thinking about this the past couple weeks and just needed to let it out and see if anyone can give me advice. I have been a nurse for about 6 years now. My family makes nursing sounds so great since I was young and because of that I feel like I never really thought that there are other career options more suitable for me. When I started working as a nurse, I didn’t necessarily love it. It wasn’t how I thought it would be. The high anxiety for 12 hours, worrying about time managment and balance between checking off the work lists and keeping my patients safe and comfortable and happy, short staffed, and being away from family long hours, weekends and holidays. I just feel like everything is sucking the happiness out of me. I tried working on different specialties such as psych, home health, rehab, med surg floor, and now ICU for 6months. I really thought I would finally find my niche and be happy to be finally an ICU nurse since that was originally my career goal. However, I feel like it makes me even more anxious going to work now and also switching from days to midnights makes me even more dreadful going to work. I just feel deppressed because I am at lost and don’t know what to do. Should I just stick it out for a year to gain that experience for better career opportunities in the future? Should I just leave bedside nursing all together and be a case manager, utilization review or nursing consultant? Maybe work in a clinic or procedural nurse? I just want to be happy and go to work without being so anxious and stress. Thanks for reading.  

CommunityRNBSN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Community health. Has 4 years experience. 724 Posts

Outpatient nursing isn’t for everyone, but it is for me!  I work in an FQHC. Of course it can be stressful (show me a job that isn’t) but it is totally different from inpatient. For one thing, nobody’s life depends on me while I’m at work. I also clock out and leave at 4:30 every day. It is a really great— very underserved— arena in which to work. 

WingsRN

Specializes in NICU/NFP. Has 7 years experience. 2 Posts

Hi! I was super lost as a high school/ college student, so when my mom pushed me towards nursing, I complacently agreed. During school, I thought I didn't like the typical nursing, but had that idea that every other nursing student did, do my bedside time, go to NP school and skidaddle. I was a NICU nurse for my first 5 years, fresh out of school. I did feel the same anxiety and dread, especially at the beginning. I LOVE the NICU, don't get me wrong, but that anxiety and dread never left. I recently found out about NFP, and now I am currently a Nurse Home Visitor with Nurse Family Partnership and it's a completely different type of nursing. Check it out! I had no idea NFP existed, and want to know what else is out there besides the usual bedside, management, educator positions. 

2BS Nurse, BSN

Has 9 years experience. 568 Posts

On 1/4/2021 at 2:46 PM, CommunityRNBSN said:

Outpatient nursing isn’t for everyone, but it is for me!  I work in an FQHC. Of course it can be stressful (show me a job that isn’t) but it is totally different from inpatient. For one thing, nobody’s life depends on me while I’m at work. I also clock out and leave at 4:30 every day. It is a really great— very underserved— arena in which to work. 

I too work in the outpatient setting. True, nobody's life depends on me, however, I definitely do not get out at 4:30 p.m. every day. There is a lot of pressure for the MDs to make $ which means more and more patients added to the schedule without additional support staff. I can work 8 a.m. - 6 p.m. without eating the entire day. It's till better than working inpatient I suppose, but I don't love the job. I simply tolerate it.

Peachpit

Has 32 years experience. 104 Posts

I also work in an outpatient based setting in case management visiting clients in their home. The position is not clinical/not home health which has been nice.

While overall it's not a stressful job, the schedule load has increased exponentially since I started the position last year. When I started, nurses were expected to see 3 clients within an 1 hour drive time (one way) from their homes (which was reasonable) daily. This expectation changed Jan 1 to nurses  seeing 3 clients up to 2 hours one way from their home. The work hours being 8-5 have quickly turned into leaving before 8 and returning home after 5. Mileage has gone from a few hundred miles a week to close to 1000 (seriously). 

 Like 2Bs Nurse said, there is a lot of pressure on doctors/companies to add "more" which trickles down to the forward facing staff. What is happening where I am is the nurses, myself included, who left bedside nursing for a more life/work balance are finding it difficult as well.

 2BS Nurse said, I don't love the job, I tolerate it because it's still better than bedside.

I personally wouldn't stick out a job that made me feel consistently like you are feeling about yours. There are other options, maybe not perfect ones, but still ones that may give you some balance and peace back.

RN10, BSN, RN

Specializes in Maternal and Child Health. Has 23 years experience. 1 Post

Hi Nurses,

I'm new to communicating through a feed on this site.  Hope this goes through.  Community RNBSN, what is FQHC?  I have about 17 years in Maternal and Child Health Homecare, currently not working as schools have been off and on so home to be a Mom right now, but would love to figure out my plan for return to work that will offer a good work/life balance  and not be school nursing.  Any thoughts?

 

Peachpit

Has 32 years experience. 104 Posts

1 hour ago, RN10 said:

Hi Nurses,

I'm new to communicating through a feed on this site.  Hope this goes through.  Community RNBSN, what is FQHC?  I have about 17 years in Maternal and Child Health Homecare, currently not working as schools have been off and on so home to be a Mom right now, but would love to figure out my plan for return to work that will offer a good work/life balance  and not be school nursing.  Any thoughts?

 

FQHC =Federally Qualified Health Center.

As for where, I work it is not bad..just need more staff as the company has grown a LOT in a short period of time. We had a "zoom" meeting this morning and the leadership realizes they have to balance things until we can get nurses hired. They definitely value nurses and listen to us and take what we need seriously and act on it quickly.

Depending on the state you live, you may want to consider a position like I have as care manager.

Feel free to message me if you want more info.

2BS Nurse, BSN

Has 9 years experience. 568 Posts

What kind of nursing background do you need to work in a FQHC?

MM008

4 Posts

Thank you guys for your inputs! Sorry for late reply. I am trying to apply for a case management job within the same hospital. I've been working with my ICU position for 7 months and I am nervous and feel bad of quitting because they did train me for a couple months on this position. I am afraid they will say something bad about me quitting this position so early. I know people say to wait for a year and it will get better but I don't think I can wait for a few more months. I love the people and the management and even taking care of patients but I think I am just really burnt out of bedside nursing at this time. I just feel bad that it took me to feel like this not until I started this new position. 

Peachpit

Has 32 years experience. 104 Posts

Why feel bad about doing what is right for you? a LOT of people go into jobs or relationships for that matter hoping for the best, expecting the best but realize after some time the fit just isn't good. It makes ZERO sense to me to stay in any job or relationship when a person knows 100% it just isn't going to work. I am one of the few one this board I guess that does not understand the magical one year rule. 

Be upfront when asked about why you want to leave the position..that while you are appreciative the of experience it has also taught you that that particular flavor of nursing is just not what you feel highlights your skills/talents and doesn't fit will your overall view of where you can best service patients. Then highlight what would make you a good case manager pulling from the experience you've had thus far and your interest/personality.

Above all, don't feel bad or feel like you have to apologize to anyone for looking out for yourself. I personally would prefer a nurse to take care of me in ICU who WANTS to be there/feels comfortable, not one that feels she/he HAS to be there. Just as I would want someone to case manage my care that WANTS to case manage versus someone who hates it.

Good luck - hope it works out for you soon

MM008

4 Posts

4 hours ago, Peachpit said:

Why feel bad about doing what is right for you? a LOT of people go into jobs or relationships for that matter hoping for the best, expecting the best but realize after some time the fit just isn't good. It makes ZERO sense to me to stay in any job or relationship when a person knows 100% it just isn't going to work. I am one of the few one this board I guess that does not understand the magical one year rule. 

Be upfront when asked about why you want to leave the position..that while you are appreciative the of experience it has also taught you that that particular flavor of nursing is just not what you feel highlights your skills/talents and doesn't fit will your overall view of where you can best service patients. Then highlight what would make you a good case manager pulling from the experience you've had thus far and your interest/personality.

Above all, don't feel bad or feel like you have to apologize to anyone for looking out for yourself. I personally would prefer a nurse to take care of me in ICU who WANTS to be there/feels comfortable, not one that feels she/he HAS to be there. Just as I would want someone to case manage my care that WANTS to case manage versus someone who hates it.

Good luck - hope it works out for you soon

Thank you. I appreciate the support. Makes me feel a little more confident with what I am doing. 🙂