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New Graduates who don't welcome feedback

Emergency   (6,805 Views | 23 Replies)
by Majain2013 Majain2013 (New) New

Majain2013 has 13 years experience and specializes in Emergency.

462 Profile Views; 2 Posts

You are reading page 2 of New Graduates who don't welcome feedback. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

exit96 has 3 years experience and specializes in EMERGENCY, ICU,M/S.

414 Posts; 10,306 Profile Views

While I'd love to get on a "younger generation band wagon" ( because I do believe that integrity, ethics etc have declined steadily) I do have to admit I see this behavior in different age groups. At the risk of sounding prejudice, in my experience it HAS been the older ladies who think they have to text their kids constantly, or step outside to call or take a call, or females in general. I'd love to see a day where ALL cell phones were inoperable, then see if "little Janey/ Johnny figures out how to butter a saltine without being coached through the whole process by over protective parent." I cannot say that I have seen this in my male colleagues that are "new/younger," and I wonder if it might be that guys just use straight talk and don't have to handle each other with "kids gloves" constantly. Most times us guys just say " hey dude, I need a hand over here." And the other Dude knows it isn't a personal jab, it's just plain talk without the unnecessary patronizing filler words.

Oops!!! Not trying to derail the conversation, so: teach those who want to learn, and those who need to suffer the torment of their own arrogance/ignorance, LET THEM FALL, as long as it doesn't harm a patient.

Edited by exit96
Added last paragraph

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BrooklynRN11201 has 1 years experience.

152 Posts; 7,342 Profile Views

honestly, as a new grad who externed in the ED and am about to start working there, I say invite the person to lunch or coffee and have a little heart to heart from a place of friendliness, not as a preceptor or educator. say that you've noticed some things and want to see this person succeed, and you're coming at them with suggestions. I think doing it outside the unit where things might be more calm and the grounds more neutral is probably better than getting frustrated in the heat of the moment or saying/suggesting things on the unit.

as a new grad/new nurse, I think I'd actually appreciate this, but then again, I'm pretty much the opposite of the new grads you're describing so they could view it completely different.

I think that as a new nurse you do have this sort of excitement "I can do anything" attitude, especially being hired to work your first position in the ED... there's plenty of room to get cocky. Someone having more of an experienced friend vibe is probably more conducive than the motherly vibe.

If this is something you're experiencing with a larger group of new nurses, be mindful of your prejudices. It's fine to have your difference of opinion but be honest with yourself - are they putting patients in direct harm or are their work styles just different?

Lastly, if it is a larger group and you are positively justified in your assessment, don't take this on yourself. Tell someone else what you've noticed and suggest a casual meeting amongst several more senior members of the team to figure out the best possible steps forward while keeping the development of the new grads in mind, not just reprimanding them.

Edited by BrooklynRN11201

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22 Posts; 1,167 Profile Views

I think taking a step back, letting them sink or swim (without risking patient safety) is the idea here. When they aren't being a team player and too busy in their phones or whatever (regardless of age) you just ensure you take care of your patients and let management see their behaviors. Believe me, patient satisfaction will decline and morale will decline when they see no one is playing nice with them and taking an interest in their learning anymore. They will notice the decline in support and suddenly realize that the Emergency Department is about TEAMWORK. That teamwork means helping each other out at all times, stocking your rooms and others, and looking up from the phone long enough to say "Is there anything I can help you with right now?".

Some people just have no common sense and this is just a paycheck to them. The job takes concentration, recognition that we are dealing with LIVES and consideration for our coworkers. You either understand that, or you don't and if you don't then you sink and leave the department.

Best of luck to you and your career, hope these "know it all" newbies figure it out, QUICK.

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RNFiona has 13 years experience and specializes in ER.

211 Posts; 6,531 Profile Views

I started in ED as new grad and was scared to death and that was over 10 years ago. I never dared pull any of that crap. Overconfidence kills patients

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RNFiona has 13 years experience and specializes in ER.

211 Posts; 6,531 Profile Views

To be honest I haven't really experienced 2 much of that with new grads. A few bad apples, here and there. Most are excited and eager to learn. The ones who are not don't last very long.

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7 Posts; 674 Profile Views

Maybe they are trying really hard but it just doesn't seem a lot to you because you've been a nurse awhile and are more efficient. I know when I was a student one of my preceptors only focused on things I did wrong and eventually I started to perform poorly in areas I previously excelled in all because I was so nervous around her and was trying too hard for a person that would never recognize my strengths no matter how hard I tried. As for phones that is completely unacceptable, on my unit it is the same the older nurses are more apt to go on their phones. It's also odd that they won't accept your feedback? I know I always love feedback but it is also how my peers put it that makes a huge difference! Good luck and know that communication is key maybe having a meeting? Because I'm sure everyone has a different perspective and it will only get worst if it festers!

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cricket67 has 4 years experience and specializes in Emergency Dept.

4 Posts; 738 Profile Views

I have seen this in our department - SOME new grads ( from 21 to 45) appear uninterested in feedback or suggestions from seasoned nurses. When I was a new grad I listened constantly and asked for feedback from more experienced nurses.

This has been discussed in our department - in an effort to understand why this is happening. We haven't figured it out. We have had some poor outcomes due to new grads giving inappropriate meds, and working out of their scope of practice. At this point - I feel like it is managements problem as they have been made aware. In the meantime, I don't let them near my patients, and sadly, I often stay away from theirs to preserve my license

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Emilynn09 has 2 years experience and specializes in Emergency.

348 Posts; 6,768 Profile Views

I have had several experiences where the new grads will practice beyond their scope, demonstrate terrible documentation skills, and outright refuse to care for patients. They frequently take breaks to check their phones and emails, and never think to offer assistance to their teammates.

It sounds like you've got some bad apples there in your department. It might be worthwhile to mention your frustration to your management, especially if you have attempted to resolve the issue yourself with these new nurses. Nobody wants to see anyone be fired, but if someone is not going to take direction and learn to focus on their job and responsibilities- and they are not going to take suggestions and criticism well, maybe the ED is not the place for them at this point in their career.

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3 Articles; 2,815 Posts; 30,510 Profile Views

I wonder where the OP went? Did they not welcome our feedback?

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IrishErin specializes in ER, Addictions, Geriatrics.

256 Posts; 4,080 Profile Views

I wonder where the OP went? Did they not welcome our feedback?

I just chuckled a bit

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EmergencyNrse has 17 years experience and specializes in Emergency Medicine.

632 Posts; 6,971 Profile Views

I know the mentality. I know the personality type. Go ahead and let them fall. Let them "feel" their way. Just make sure YOUR name isn't on any of their patients charts...

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Ikikaeru has 8 years experience.

58 Posts; 2,097 Profile Views

Maybe its the tone you use. Personaly I take all of the experienced nurses tips and insights to heart. I hope you do not take offense but the tone of this post seems to be a bit harsh. Sassy5d seemed to state her opinion (as you did with your post) and you seemed to take it as an attack and "look at how bad other nurses are".

You probably are a wonderful nurse with great input but sometimes when were to a breaking point the things we say can come out harsher than we mean them to.

But thats just my two cents.

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