New grads how did you land a job?

Nurses General Nursing

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I'm a new graduate nurse (still dont have the license but I'm scheduled for the NCLEX in the mid of August) and I was wondering how did the new grads found their jobs or any nurse for that matter? Did you walk in to the health care facility and spoke to the nursing manager or you applied online? I have applied online to a few places with no success yet,nothing major yet since I'm more somewhat concern about passing the NCLEX and do I even stand a chance to get a job since I dont have a license behind my belt,thanks...

LyndzBenz

26 Posts

Specializes in Ha! I am gaining experience everyday!.

After I graduated in December, I waited 3 months to take my RN exam. Our teachers in class said to question the newspaper ads for nurses and try to stay away from any that try to give you a big bonus with signing a contract. Her words, not mine. After I passed I started hitting up the online applications like crazy. I thought that I would be hired immediately because of the nursing shortage and because I graduated in December (thinking that I would have an advantage because of the earlier graduation before those in May). Well, I was surprised when it took me nearly a month to land a job. I actually applied for 5 hospitals somewhat close to where I live. Other places that were farther south were my last bit jobs. The 5th hospital ended up hiring me. I got that job because they needed new nurses. It may take you that long, it may not, or it may take longer. Depends on demographics. First: have a very good but to the point resume, second: make sure you are up to date on CPR/BLS or ACLS if going to a cardiac/ICU floor, Third: when the time comes to go to that job interview, make sure you look polished and well put together. Have confidence, don't shy away from asking questions. I think that I had more questions about nurse to patient ratio, mandatory overtime, floating policies, pay (ask at the end of the interview), and many other things than my interviewer did. Also, be proud of yourself. You have made it through nursing school to become something very unselfish. A nurse. Also, have fun. Hope this helps.

Specializes in Geriatrics, Home Health.

I applied online and went to job fairs. The job fairs turned out to be a complete waste of time. I found my current job through Craigslist.

blondy2061h, MSN, RN

1 Article; 4,094 Posts

Specializes in Oncology.

My school had job fairs. I printed copies of my resume and handed them out at the fair. A lot of places gave me applications there. I ended up picking fields I was interested in and facilities w/ good benefits. I applied to 4 places and was offered jobs at all 4 places.

What I want to know is, what makes one person stand out above the rest? For hiring managers, why does one person get offered 4 jobs or even lots of interviews, and others apply to every job possible and nothing!?! What's the difference?

DManAZRN

50 Posts

Specializes in Med/Surg Cystic Fibrosis Gero/Psych.

Well, making less than they're current experienced RN's helps... it motivates them to hire you OVER someone WITH experience. Pretty good advantage I'd say.

So much for that fake nursing "shortage".

Specializes in Oncology, Med-Surg.

here is my hints to getting a job that helped for me!

+ Have your health clearance ready, ie TB, Hep B, immunization, N95 fitting, etc. This makes it easier to get hired/application process to go faster.

+Make sure you have all your certifications, ie BLS, first aide, etc. And look into maybe getting ALCS, PALS, NRP to be more marketable.

+ If you work in the hospital as a aide or clerk, continue working there till you pass your NCLEX. Your manager could offer you a job or you could transfer within the hospital for a new grad position. I notice most hopitals these days rather hire from within or experience nurses then a new grad. If you dont have a job in the hospital or experience, then your going to have a hard time looking for a job. I notice people with no experience in healthcare are having a hard time looking for work as a RN. I have friends who have to work as aides first even if they are a RN before they can have a RN job. This is a waste of time!

+ Job fairs help. Sometimes more competitive, but at least you know what is out there and who is hiring. Plus they are a wealth of informative because they may offer tips on how to interview, resume, etc.

+ Networking is important. Sometimes it still matters with who you know and if they like you or not. If your in a club or organization grow ties with nurse leader who could help you get into a hospital. Introduce yourself to managers (door to door), at Nursing board meetings, or nursing union.

+ Volunteer. At least your getting your foot in the door.

I worked for a hospital as an aide in Mother Baby and did my internship in Labor and Delivery while I was in nursing school. I graduated in December 2008 and passed my NCLEX in March 2009. The hospital did not offer me a new grad RN position so I transfer to their sister hospital in Med-Surg, but because of my low seniority there, I was not going to get train as a RN for a LONG LONG TIME. So I applied to all the other hospitals as a aide, clerk, and RN. I applied online, fax, and mailed my resume to hospital, rehab, and nursing homes. I finally landed a job as a RN in Med-Surg/Oncology unit of an acute care hospital (Kaiser Permanente) in May 2009 and started working as a RN. My training is about 6 to 8 weeks.

I hope this helps. Good luck.

blondy2061h, MSN, RN

1 Article; 4,094 Posts

Specializes in Oncology.

I don't think I stood out. My area just really is hiring a lot of nurses constantly. All of my classmates were offered similarly high numbers of jobs. I'm not sure what's going on in other areas, as the nursing shortage seems very real here, and all news sources seem to agree it's real.

MedSurgeMess

985 Posts

Specializes in Med/Surg, ICU, educator.
What I want to know is, what makes one person stand out above the rest? For hiring managers, why does one person get offered 4 jobs or even lots of interviews, and others apply to every job possible and nothing!?! What's the difference?

I think there are areas where there is more need than others. Some geographic areas, on the other hand, are having an overflow of new grads. The economy hasn't helped in these areas, as the cost of orienting a new grad is $40-$60 grand per nurse, whereas experienced nurses take only a fraction of the expense, so most facilities are hiring experienced RNs to work.

beachbutterfly

414 Posts

great advices,thanks!!!

beachbutterfly

414 Posts

After I graduated in December, I waited 3 months to take my RN exam. Our teachers in class said to question the newspaper ads for nurses and try to stay away from any that try to give you a big bonus with signing a contract. Her words, not mine. After I passed I started hitting up the online applications like crazy. I thought that I would be hired immediately because of the nursing shortage and because I graduated in December (thinking that I would have an advantage because of the earlier graduation before those in May). Well, I was surprised when it took me nearly a month to land a job. I actually applied for 5 hospitals somewhat close to where I live. Other places that were farther south were my last bit jobs. The 5th hospital ended up hiring me. I got that job because they needed new nurses. It may take you that long, it may not, or it may take longer. Depends on demographics. First: have a very good but to the point resume, second: make sure you are up to date on CPR/BLS or ACLS if going to a cardiac/ICU floor, Third: when the time comes to go to that job interview, make sure you look polished and well put together. Have confidence, don't shy away from asking questions. I think that I had more questions about nurse to patient ratio, mandatory overtime, floating policies, pay (ask at the end of the interview), and many other things than my interviewer did. Also, be proud of yourself. You have made it through nursing school to become something very unselfish. A nurse. Also, have fun. Hope this helps.

Yep I'm in somewhat similar position,I'm taking my boards on august 12,2009 and I'v graduated May 16.It took me little time to motivate myself,overcome my fears of the NCLEX and pick the exam date,this month I will study hardcore since I only have four weeks left and still much of material to be covered.

GeriatrxRN

34 Posts

I don't think I stood out. My area just really is hiring a lot of nurses constantly. All of my classmates were offered similarly high numbers of jobs. I'm not sure what's going on in other areas, as the nursing shortage seems very real here, and all news sources seem to agree it's real.

I'm sure a lot of us new grads would like to know what city you live in. LOL. I'm in Troy, Michigan (northern suburb of Detroit) and I've been told by a hospital nurse recruiter that although there's a nursing shortage she said that there is a hiring bubble right now. She stated that they're not hiring due to the fact that nurses are not retiring because of the state of the economy plus nurses that were working part-time are now picking up extra shifts or switching to full time due to the fact that their husbands are out of a job from the automotive industry. She also stated that she's not sure how long this bubble will last, but as soon as these nurses retire there will be a big nursing shortage. (Maybe that's what she meant by nursing shortage). She also said that MI state health dept called her and requested that when they are hiring again to contact them since they are having a problem with the fact that a lot of MI nurses are leaving the state. I'm not sure if this is unique to our state because of the layoffs from the auto industry, but from reading other posts it seems like a lot of other states are having the same hiring issues.

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