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New Grad Training During COVID-19

Disasters   (861 Views | 5 Replies)

nursemeeshell has 1 years experience as a BSN.

34 Profile Views; 3 Posts

I am a new graduate nurse starting my first job the beginning of April. I noticed that many residency programs are pushing back their cohort start dates due to the COVID-19 pandemic because nurses do not have the time to train new hires. My hospital does not have a residency program, but provides six weeks of orientation. I understand that the nurses precepting me will be especially busy during this time, so I don’t know if I should be concerned about receiving adequate training. I was wondering if I should take the offer or wait it out for a different opportunity.

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322 Posts; 71,844 Profile Views

On one hand, now would be the best time to get a nursing job, especially for those who have been struggling to snag one for months. On the other hand, what is the point of getting the job only to then succumb to the virus?

If you want to wait until this pandemic dies down, no one (with a brain) would blame you. Some factors to consider:

-Can you afford to wait? Do you have enough savings in your account to last you about six months?

-Is this opportunity located in one of the states with a high incidence of the coronavirus (like New York or Washington)?

-Are you prepared for the chance of having to work without gloves, masks, and hand sanitizers?

-Are you living with someone else? If so, would that person(s) be okay with you working during the pandemic?

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6 Posts; 407 Profile Views

I've also been wondering what training would be like during a time like this. I am also a new grad and prior to this outbreak I had been searching for jobs to no avail. I live in NYC and received a letter from the governor requesting health care professionals to sign up and volunteer in the event that the virus gets worse. My concern is what kind of training would they be providing at a time like this? I have no experience outside of nursing school. Volunteer also doesn't offer health benefits if I get sick. I'd like to help but not at the expense of exposing myself and parents (who I live with) that are over 65. Wondering if this is the right time to try and get my feet wet or if I should just hold out on looking for a job/volunteering until this whole thing settles down a bit.

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3 Followers; 4,775 Posts; 36,681 Profile Views

1 hour ago, Erica10 said:

I've also been wondering what training would be like during a time like this. I am also a new grad and prior to this outbreak I had been searching for jobs to no avail. I live in NYC and received a letter from the governor requesting health care professionals to sign up and volunteer in the event that the virus gets worse. My concern is what kind of training would they be providing at a time like this? I have no experience outside of nursing school. Volunteer also doesn't offer health benefits if I get sick. I'd like to help but not at the expense of exposing myself and parents (who I live with) that are over 65. Wondering if this is the right time to try and get my feet wet or if I should just hold out on looking for a job/volunteering until this whole thing settles down a bit.

Why not see if you can get hired now? Even if it's a temporary job? If you do a good job, they will likely hire you permanently.

Volunteering - who will cover malpractice claims for volunteers? It is a way to get a foot in the door, of course.

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It probably won't settle down for a good few months, if not a year. It's probably better to get into the system sooner than later, especially if what is happening in Italy happens elsewhere. I was lucky enough to start a month ago but the nurses in my ward still have the time to precept and guide new grads, we even had students a week ago. The senior nurses are a different story, as they are running around planning and preparing, but even then they'll still help when possible.

Plus, theres never been a more unique time to learn how to nurse.

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6 Posts; 67 Profile Views

Seems like it varies by hospital. I know that NYP/Weill Cornell cancelled its ER New Grad Residency program, and other places in NYC are pushing back start dates as well. Lots of nurses are being told they cannot use masks & gloves, and that they have to reuse the same mask every day. I agree with the others who've said it really depends on your circumstances. Training for new hires might be easier outside of the epicenters. Personally I live with relatives who are over 65, and at the moment I have nowhere else to go, so it's not an easy decision!

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