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New CRNA licensure

CRNA   (930 Views | 7 Replies)

DreameRN has 10 years experience as a BSN.

4,199 Profile Views; 110 Posts

I am wondering if anyone can fill me in on how it would work for CRNA licensure. I am graduating from one state, but I won't be staying in this state, only am here for school.  Primary license is the school state license.  I am hoping to work in a different state.  How does this work for CRNA license? Do I need to take my boards in a different state, or get my RN license switched prior to applying for CRNA license? Thanks!

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ProgressiveThinking has 7 years experience as a MSN, CRNA and specializes in Anesthesia.

429 Posts; 13,527 Profile Views

I would apply for your RN licensure in the state you're going to work in ASAP in order to speed up the process of getting an APRN license after graduation (that's how it works in my state anyways and there's already a couple month wait). Different departments work on RN licensure and APRN licensure, so speed up the process by getting your RN license out of the way now. You have to be licensed as a RN in a state in order to be licensed as a CRNA, in my state at least. I would find out if the state you're going to work in has a wait for APRN licensure. For instance, mine has a 2 month wait just to get your application looked at, so I applied a month prior to graduation. Some states let you apply prior to graduation, others don't. 

My school basically asked me what state I was going to work in after graduation and then sent my transcripts to my states BRN the day after I graduated. 

When you take the NCE it's through the NBCRNA, which is our national board of certification. It doesn't matter what state you take it in. When you sign up for the NCE, the NBCRNA asks what state you plan on practicing in. 2 days after I passed boards the NBCRNA electronically notified my state that I passed and sent my NBCRNA # to them. You can also request that they electronically send it through the NBCRNA website for free.

I would contact the board of nursing in your state to see what the most efficient route would be.

Edited by ProgressiveThinking

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subee has 48 years experience as a MSN, CRNA and specializes in CRNA, Finally retired.

1 Follower; 1,818 Posts; 18,494 Profile Views

CRNA is a certification, not a license.

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ProgressiveThinking has 7 years experience as a MSN, CRNA and specializes in Anesthesia.

429 Posts; 13,527 Profile Views

3 hours ago, subee said:

CRNA is a certification, not a license.

helpful

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DreameRN has 10 years experience as a BSN.

110 Posts; 4,199 Profile Views

Thanks Progressive that really helps...  I'll start the application process early then in switching my RN license once I have a job offer and I get closer to graduation.  Appreciate it!

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loveanesthesia specializes in CRNA.

1 Follower; 785 Posts; 13,392 Profile Views

If you are moving from one nursing compact state to another, you cannot apply to transfer your RN license more than 90 days in advance of moving.

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wtbcrna is a MSN, DNP, CRNA and specializes in Anesthesia.

1 Follower; 5,045 Posts; 52,585 Profile Views

23 hours ago, loveanesthesia said:

If you are moving from one nursing compact state to another, you cannot apply to transfer your RN license more than 90 days in advance of moving.

Do you know if that also applies for active duty military ?

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loveanesthesia specializes in CRNA.

1 Follower; 785 Posts; 13,392 Profile Views

You can only hold a multi-state RN license in one compact state at a time. It must be held in your state of residence, and you can practice on it in any compact state. You may physically practice in a another compact state for any length of time. This is not unusual for military members. You must have multi-state privileges. If you only have single state privileges then you must apply for a license any other state, compact or noncompact. Individuals on a monitoring program for various reasons may be restricted to single state privileges.   

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