Jump to content

Nervous

Posted

Has 5 years experience.

I have worked at the same LTC facility for 6 years. I was a CNA, then an LPN, and now currently an RN. After I finished my RN program, I was about to start working at a hospital. However, I got cold feet and stayed at the LTC facility. I feel like I’ve got an attachment there. I’ve only been back full time for a month and I’m miserable. It’s changed so much and I’m tired of having my head bit off or constantly being in trouble for stupid things. I have put in a few applications to other places but I’m so nervous and keep wondering if I’m doing the right thing. I don’t know if it’s because I’m just so comfortable where I’m at and I’m scared to try something new, or if I truly just need to stay put. Did anyone else on here ever feel this way? And I’m struggling with how to tell my boss that I’m leaving after just resuming a full-time position. Even though I dread work every day because it’s always something I’m being berated over and I’m constantly being shuffled to work as a CNA or come in late and not getting my hours in, I feel like I’m doing something sh***y. Any advice?

GrumpyRN, NP

Specializes in Emergency Department. Has 39 years experience.

29 minutes ago, CP2016 said:

I don’t know if it’s because I’m just so comfortable where I’m at...

29 minutes ago, CP2016 said:

Even though I dread work every day...

These two sentences are incompatible with each other.

You are an RN now so you are possibly getting frustrated at being treated as a CNA. Also the people there remember you as, and are treating you as, a CNA. Time to move on if you can find a job. You have spent the time and money getting your qualification - now use it.

Good luck.

Siriusly29

Has 5 years experience.

Just now, GrumpyRN said:

These two sentences are incompatible with each other.

You are an RN now so you are possibly getting frustrated at being treated as a CNA. Also the people there remember you as, and are treating you as, a CNA. Time to move on if you can find a job. You have spent the time and money getting your qualification - now use it.

Good luck.

I guess what I meant by “comfortable” is that I know what I’m doing there and I feel like I’ve got the system down pat. I definitely feel like I’m treated different because I was a CNA there and even before that I held another job there. Thank you for your response! I feel like you pretty well summed up what I couldn’t put my finger on. I feel like being other things there before I was a nurse, I’m not taken seriously and not treated like a valued nurse

JabuJabule, LPN

Specializes in LTC & Pediatrics. Has 2 years experience.

I am sort of in the same boat. In LTC for 8 months now, super comfortable at work and happy. But I accepted a second job offer at a hospital, for more experience. I feel like I'm betraying my LTC job in a way, except I'm doing both per diem. So trust me, you are not alone.

Have you thought about going back to per diem at the nursing home and going full time somewhere else? You definitely deserve better.

I'm nervous too, so I understand. But to get further in life we have to put ourselves in uncomfortable situations. We need to move forward despite hardships if we want to better ourselves and our lives.

You are going to have to learn how to appropriately (I.e. pleasantly, if possible) stand up to non-sense no matter where you are or where you go.

Learn all you can so that you have a good foundation from which to advocate for both patients and yourself.

Siriusly29

Has 5 years experience.

3 minutes ago, JabuJabule said:

I am sort of in the same boat. In LTC for 8 months now, super comfortable at work and happy. But I accepted a second job offer at a hospital, for more experience. I feel like I'm betraying my LTC job in a way, except I'm doing both per diem. So trust me, you are not alone.

Have you thought about going back to per diem at the nursing home and going full time somewhere else? You definitely deserve better.

I'm nervous too, so I understand. But to get further in life we have to put ourselves in uncomfortable situations. We need to move forward despite hardships if we want to better ourselves and our lives.

That’s what I keep telling myself! I want to learn and staying in the same facility forever is not the way to do that. I feel like I’ve seen everything the LTC facility has to offer. It has changed so much there that I think once I leave I’m just completely out of there. I can’t see myself working there any if I did stay PRN. I completely understand what you’re going through. Good luck at the hospital! I hope you love it😊

Siriusly29

Has 5 years experience.

26 minutes ago, JKL33 said:

You are going to have to learn how to appropriately (I.e. pleasantly, if possible) stand up to non-sense no matter where you are or where you go.

Learn all you can so that you have a good foundation from which to advocate for both patients and yourself.

I think that’s my biggest issue where I’m at. I’ve been talked to awful and if I say anything back, no matter how polite I am, I end up in the bosses office. Whereas when another nurse stands up for herself, it’s met with an attitude of “good for you, you’ve got to be tough and take up for yourself”. It’s made me an insanely nervous person. After a shift, I spend the whole next day going over everything I said wondering if anything I said and what I said would land me in trouble.

You have to have an air of pleasant confidence....all the time. Carry yourself that way entirely. Don't slouch, don't tiptoe around meekly waiting for someone to attack. Pick yourself up, put your shoulders back, put a smile on your face and interact with people in a pleasantly confident manner. The goal is to avoid all unnecessary confrontation (well, that's my goal anyway). Try to learn to handle interactions without immediately becoming personally affected by them. Let a lot of things go, they aren't worth it. As the saying goes, "never roll in the mud with pigs...they like it, and you get dirty." What that means is that if you can avoid feelings of personal insult every time you turn around, you can avoid having to carry on back and forth jabs with people who are being ridiculous. Just let them be ridiculous while you go take care of patients. If you argue with them or insist on defending your honor/pride, you just end up reacting to stupidity and getting sucked right into it.

Standing up for yourself doesn't mean fighting with people or always being willing to tell them how it is. It means being neutral, hearing feedback or a question or even a criticism, listening to it, clarifying if necessary, and responding calmly.

Things like that.

Develop good rapports with your coworkers and superiors as much as you can. Be willing to help others, use your pleases and thank yous, and general pleasantries. Etc.

Other than that, focus on learning what you need to learn as a newer nurse and take the best care of patients that you can and you'll be okay.

I understand why you want to stay where you're comfortable, but you can handle a challenge. There's a time for everything, and maybe this is your time to see what other opportunities there are for you to gain a solid nursing foundation.

Best of luck ~