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chrisRN180 chrisRN180 (New Member) New Member

Need advice on picking best RN to BSN online program

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Hey everyone, I was looking for some advice for picking a good online RN-BSN program, my biggest concern is that it has the appropriate accreditation's so that if I wanted to continue into an NP or DNP program local to me later that all my credits would be accepted. I've found so many schools that advertise cheap and super fast, but I'm always scared that if it's to good to be true then it is. Some schools advertise 6 months and some are the full 2 years? I don't care as much about the time as I do about it being recognized a legitimate by any graduate degree program I might apply for later. Just looking for some guidance or maybe someone who has done their rn to bsn online and then attended a graduate program at another school who may know what is most important to look for when deciding what online programs to apply for. Thank you!

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Look for regional and CCNE or ACEN accreditation as a starting point. Then make yourself a list of programs that interest you with tuition, course length, pros/cons. No one else can make this decision for you because only you know what will really work for you. There are literally hundreds of programs that we could suggest. You might start with universities in your state. Good luck!

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Thanks! I was looking for maybe some specific credentials or accreditation's that will ensure that my online degree is acceptable by any reputable graduate degree program. You said CCNE And ACEN, will these accreditation's alone ensure the degree is acceptable by any other school? Sorry for my ignorance, I'm a brand new RN and i really don't know much about which accreditation's are most important for a nursing program. Thanks again!

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Most nursing programs have either CCNE or ACEN accreditation, either is fine. Regional accreditation is important because your credits are more likely to be widely accepted at other schools.

CCNE: American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) > CCNE Accreditation

ACEN: Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing

Good info on regional accreditation: What is regional accreditation and why is it important? | Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education

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I was looking for maybe some specific credentials or accreditation's that will ensure that my online degree is acceptable by any reputable graduate degree program.

You might also want to consider researching the graduate degree programs you would potentially apply to later on. Most program websites will include fairly detailed information on what is required for admission, including any undergraduate degree accreditation requirements. If it's not explicitly stated there, a quick email to the program's admission department should clear up any uncertainty. Good luck in your search.

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I am applying for Indiana state online lpn to BSN program. They are ACEN accredited. I think they have a program online for RNs as well.

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After learning more about accreditations i really see the importance of not just the nursing related ones but also the regional. so i've narrowed it down to probably Chamberlain or Grand Canyon University. Anyone have experience they would like to share with either online program? anyone have experience with graduating from these programs and continuing into a graduate degree program at another school with or without issues? or having to repeat classes? just trying to be thorough with my research on both programs! thanks so much to everyone with the help so far!

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Both are for-profit, but have all the proper accreditation. I am actually a Chamberlain grad, twice (RN-to-BSN and also nurse educator MSN). You might also consider some of the not-for-profit programs like University of Texas at Austin and WGU. Excelsior College is also a private non-profit school.

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I would stay away from for-profit schools like Chamberlain.

1) They are almost always the most expensive programs.

2) They really don't care if you make it through or not, as long as they take your money -- even if they are accredited.

3) Non-profit colleges and universities have existing student support systems you can use if you need them (like tutoring, advisors, etc.) because they've already got them for all the other subjects they teach in addition to nursing.

For-profit online schools often don't.

A non-profit university is much more likely to care if you make it through because it reflects on their metrics for the percentage of their students who finish the program and graduate.

Consider the motive behind the school. For-profit means they prioritize making money. If they start to lose money, or make less, they will make cuts in the services they provide students to maximize profit.

Non-profit schools' priority isn't making a profit, it's educating students.

That should tell you all you need to know.

A friend of mine decided to go for FNP to Chamberlain. She ended up dropping out two years into it with massive loan debt, because she had children, had to work, and got almost no support from the online instructors. She ended up with student loan payments in addition to all her other expenses, for a degree she didn't even get.

Here in Chicago we have at least four non-profit universities offering APN programs (and in addition to their colleges of nursing, also have schools of medicine). 3 are private, and 2 of those are the most expensive schools in the city for APN/NP programs.

Chamberlain was more expensive than the most expensive non-profit APN/NP program (Rush). She chose it because of their alleged flexibility, which turned out to be flexible enough to take her money, but not flexible enough to provide the student support services she would have gotten from any of the non-profit nursing schools.

I would choose a non-profit school that is an actual college or university for other subjects as well as nursing.

Most of them offer mostly or all-online programs these days. Even the students living and attending on campus, studying other subjects, do much of their homework online.

Good luck.

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Make sure they are CCNE or ACEN accredited. This is really the most important thing.

I'd also suggest against Western Governors University or any other school that operates on a pass/fail system. (Not for everyone just for your specifically based on your above stated goals) The way that WGU works is by either passing or failing. There's no A, B, C, etc., grading system. What this means is that your GPA can only amount to a total of a 3.0. This is what is considered to be the minimum acceptance cut off for many graduate level programs. You may be considered as an applicant but it won't necessarily make you a stand out applicant. I was initially attracted to WGU's low cost and potential for quick completion. After contacting a few graduate schools that I was interested in and asking about the pass/fail equivalent GPA of 3.0 they strongly discouraged it. I ended up choosing Jacksonville University's RN to BSN program and am happy with my decision. A few of my co-workers are attending or have attended a local state college, Daytona State, that seems pretty easy as regards to coursework. They have also recently changed to an all online system. It's also very cheap compared to JU. I don't know if you care what type of college it is that you go to but that would be a good option.

You could essentially go to an online program in any state. I'd recommending researching those in your state first. You can typically get lower in-state tuition rates. Contact the office of admissions. Ask if they are CCNE or ACEN accredited. Ask if they have GPA or pass/fail system in place (most will be GPA). This is important for most graduate level programs to stand out in a flooded market of applicants. Make sure that it is a 100% online program. Some advertise as online but actually require some campus time. They fail to put in the advertisement. You can also send an unofficial copy of your transcript(s) and they can tell you how long the program would be in total for you. This can differ based on the amount of credits you currently have and the program you apply to. For example someone who is applying with a nursing diploma may have less credit hours and have to take more courses, such as some of the general education courses that an associate's degree applicant already completed as a part of their program. If that makes sense.

Anywho, I hope this information was helpful! Good luck in your future studies!

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On 11/9/2018 at 6:05 PM, nursebert said:

Western Governors University

WGU is not the best either. They required so many credit hours just to make money out of you. and they are willing to help when you need them.

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