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MS in Midwifery

CNM   (2,420 Views | 19 Replies)
by biggolp1 biggolp1 (New) New

344 Profile Views; 9 Posts

I am looking at getting my graduate degree (for CNM) in PhilaU.

They don't award an MSN degree like other colleges.

Instead, BSN graduates can take their masters level midwifery course (at the end of which they can sit for the ACMB boards and become CNM's) but they will award a MS in Midwifery and not a Masters in Nursing.

I'm not sure what significance this bears for me.

Can anyone let me know what this would mean?

Would this hinder me in any way?

In midwifery? If I ever wanted to continue on to a DNP? If I would ever want to complete any other MSN post-masters program?

Thanks in advance for your help!

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klone has 14 years experience as a MSN, RN and specializes in Women's Health/OB Leadership.

4 Followers; 13,507 Posts; 117,354 Profile Views

My understanding is that this degree is unique to the Northeast, and is only awarded in a few states. In those other states, you may have a lot of difficulty finding a job in a hospital, as most hospitals' credentialing requires that midwives be advanced practice nurses.

You would not be a CNM with that degree. You would be a CM.

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9 Posts; 344 Profile Views

Thanks for taking the time to answer.

But I think that's a mistake.

The title conferred is DEFINITELY the CNM (accepted in all 50 states).

(Though they ALSO take non-nurses and those end up as CM's.)

From their website:

The M.S. in Midwifery is a distance education program in midwifery for Registered Nurses (RN) and CM Pathway applicants who want to become midwives... The M.S. in Midwifery program integrates online study with hands-on clinical practice... Upon graduation, you will be eligible to sit for the national examination of the American Midwifery Certification Board to earn the credential CNM or CM...

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klone has 14 years experience as a MSN, RN and specializes in Women's Health/OB Leadership.

4 Followers; 13,507 Posts; 117,354 Profile Views

I'm sorry, I misunderstood your OP. I didn't realize you had said that you already are a BSN. Yes, you are correct.

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9 Posts; 344 Profile Views

So, back to my question...

Will it make any difference if I am a CNM with an MS in Midwifery vs. an MS in Nursing?

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klone has 14 years experience as a MSN, RN and specializes in Women's Health/OB Leadership.

4 Followers; 13,507 Posts; 117,354 Profile Views

If you have passed the exam, and you are a licensed CNM, then no, I do not believe it will matter.

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LibraSunCNM has 10 years experience as a MSN and specializes in OB.

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It shouldn't matter. I went to NYU, which also awards an MS, not an MSN. I've now worked in two different states, and no one has ever questioned me or given me trouble about it. I think people outside of nursing academia probably assume all advanced practice nursing degrees are the same. It's my understanding that it shouldn't affect your ability to get a DNP either, although I can't speak for every program out there.

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9 Posts; 344 Profile Views

Thank you all!

I feel better now...

I just wanted to make sure I'm not missing anything!

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10 Posts; 1,563 Profile Views

Hey, I'm just curious- did you have your interview at PhilaU yet? I'm interviewing next week and I'm so nervous!

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9 Posts; 344 Profile Views

I didn't apply yet. I plan to apply in January.

Good luck on your interview and let us know how it goes!

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303 Posts; 5,102 Profile Views

Depending on the DNP program you might apply to, they may want you to complete some additional courses if they don't feel the master's program had equivalents. These would probably be theory, research, or policy courses and wouldn't be a big deal to complete. In terms of licensing and practice, you shouldn't have any issues.

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9 Posts; 344 Profile Views

Depending on the DNP program you might apply to, they may want you to complete some additional courses if they don't feel the master's program had equivalents. These would probably be theory, research, or policy courses and wouldn't be a big deal to complete. In terms of licensing and practice, you shouldn't have any issues.

Thank you!

Good to know...

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