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Moving,asked to write a letter of resignation

Posted

Ok to make a long story short I'm a new grad who will be moving in two weeks to another state to work as a Rn for a hospital and today I informed my boss that I'm resigning and I'm giving them a 2 week notice..My job title is not nursing related..so my boss told me I have to write a letter of resignation and I have never done it before,does anyone has any good samples?

bittybritty

Has 1 years experience.

this is the letter i used to resign from my job when i started nursing school.

[color=#333333]dear mr. xyz:

[color=#333333]the purpose of this letter is to announce my resignation from (insert company name here), effective (last date of work).

[color=#333333]this was not an easy decision to make, on my part. the past 4.5 years have been very rewarding. i've enjoyed working for you and being a part of a very successful team dedicated to the highest level of customer service.

[color=#333333]unfortunately, i do not have as much time to dedicate to working as i had previously thought. thank you very much for being so flexible with my school schedule and working with me over the years. i feel that at this point in time, school continues to be my priority, and consequently is the reason for my leave.

[color=#333333]i wish you and the company all the best. i do hope our paths cross again in the future.

[color=#333333]sincerely,

britt murphy

hope that helps!

Whispera, MSN, RN

Specializes in psych, addictions, hospice, education.

Why explain why? Your employer doesn't need the letter to tell why. They just need the letter to "officially" close your human resources file. Something like "This is my letter of resignation. My last day will be ___. Thank you for all the opportunities I have been given here. I am truly grateful. Sincerely, ____" Be sure you indicate a last day.

Meriwhen, ASN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Psych ICU, addictions.

Both letters are good. IMO you don't need to give a reason why you are leaving if you don't want to...if you are in an employment-at-will state,you don't even need to. That's up to you.

But definitely thank them for the giving you the opportunity to work there and state that you learned a lot from it (even if it was a lot of useless crap). You don't want to burn any bridges.

Also, besides turning this into your immediate supervisor, hand-walk or mail (certified) a copy of it to the HR department. There's been too many horror-story threads here about people resigning who were told by their HR departments that their letter of resignation wasn't turned in on time/at all.

Edited by Meriwhen
letter came in while I was posting.

PurpleLVN

Specializes in AA&I, research,peds, radiation oncology.

Both letters are acceptable-the most important thing is to leave in an orderly manner. Be appreciative and don't burn bridges. Although your old position is non-nursing ,you may need/request a letter of recommendation at some point!! :twocents:

classicdame, MSN, EdD

Specializes in Hospital Education Coordinator.

keep it short and sweet, unless you have a real complaint. The whole idea is to have documentation in your file that you left on good terms and would be considered for re-hire if circumstances were appropriate.

Both letters are acceptable-the most important thing is to leave in an orderly manner. Be appreciative and don't burn bridges. Although your old position is non-nursing ,you may need/request a letter of recommendation at some point!! :twocents:

Best to get a generic letter of reference from your former supervisor before you leave. You never know when you will need it and you never know when that person may leave the company.