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More bedside needed to apply?

Posted

Specializes in Pediatrics, Neurology, Public Health Education. Has 8 years experience.

Hello!

Please let me know if this has been answered elsewhere. I've recently graduated with my MPH in Health Education and Health Promotion. I have been an BSN/RN for around 7 years with a bit over a year of bedside experience, a bit of research and quite a bit of clinic nursing. I would like to apply for a BSN to DNP/FNP program next year since I've missed many of the application deadlines for this year. 

My question is, should I use the time between now and applications for next year working a bedside job? I'm not jumping up and down about the idea as bedside wasn't my favorite and my hope with the DNP is to work in a family clinic but I would do it if it would help my application. If not bedside, I'm comfortable potentially using the time to do another clinic position or utilizing my masters degree in a public health nursing aspect. Any thoughts? Thanks!

matthewandrew, NP

Specializes in Family Nursing & Psychiatry. Has 9 years experience.

I don’t think it will help. I would check the individual program requirements. I think what will help you stand out is if you are certified in your specialty. They take any background of nursing. 

sleepwalker, MSN, NP

Specializes in Occupational Health. Has 17 years experience.

Not really sure what you're hoping to accomplish with more bedside experience. You do realize that a DNP degree is a NON-CLINICAL degree, correct? 

matthewandrew, NP

Specializes in Family Nursing & Psychiatry. Has 9 years experience.

16 minutes ago, sleepwalker said:

Not really sure what you're hoping to accomplish with more bedside experience. You do realize that a DNP degree is a NON-CLINICAL degree, correct? 

I wouldn’t describe DNP as nonclinical. It is a practice doctorate as opposed to a research doctorate. Some DNP programs are still clinical focus, depends which one you decide to do. I think the more doctorates in our precession, the better.

sleepwalker, MSN, NP

Specializes in Occupational Health. Has 17 years experience.

3 hours ago, matthewandrew said:

I wouldn’t describe DNP as nonclinical. It is a practice doctorate as opposed to a research doctorate. Some DNP programs are still clinical focus, depends which one you decide to do. I think the more doctorates in our precession, the better.

a poor choice of words on my part....the DNP does not provide any additional clinical expertise. It is a practice doctorate but does not enhance clinical skills. It serves to build on traditional master's programs by providing additional education in evidence-based practice, quality improvement, systems leadership, etc. 

matthewandrew, NP

Specializes in Family Nursing & Psychiatry. Has 9 years experience.

I agree. I sure hope as healthcare evolves, so will the clinical competencies of DNP programs. Nursing practice just covers so many levels and facets of healthcare that’s standardization of the terminal degree is difficult. There’s 4 types of APRN roles plus the multitude of specializations: education, leadership, CNL, etc. 

The question posed is how do we make the degree more clinical when the argument for advanced practice nursing is that patient outcomes are equivalent or even above physicians. 

sleepwalker, MSN, NP

Specializes in Occupational Health. Has 17 years experience.

The question for me is why would I spend the time, money, and effort to obtain a terminal degree (other than it being a personal goal/achievement) resulting in debt that will literally take years to pay off before starting to recoup expenses. The degree rarely results in a pay increase (if any) significant enough to warrant obtainment.

A few examples:

1. When I worked for the local hospital system obtaining a terminal degree resulted in NO payraise. You might get more responsibilities added to your existing workload but you'd be doing it for the same money and promotional opportunities as everyone else.

2. When I worked for the State obtaining a terminal degree resulted in approximately a $750/yr pay increase. Figuring a terminal degree cost of approx. $30000 you're looking at 40 YEARS to recoup the cost of the degree BEFORE you see a return on investment.

3. Working for the private sector currently. Obtaining a terminal degree results in NO payraise.

I have more than enough degrees (2 Bachelor's, 3 Master's) and my FNP certificate to competitively apply for essentially any FNP that I'm qualified for...the terminal degree adds nothing to my resume but it sure takes away from my income.

londonflo

Specializes in oncology. Has 44 years experience.

On 9/17/2021 at 2:15 PM, sleepwalker said:

the DNP does not provide any additional clinical expertise. It is a practice doctorate but does not enhance clinical skills.

I think you are interpreting clinical expertise to be solely clinical skills. 

Quote

Clinical expertise means integrating the accumulated wealth of knowledge and information from patient care experiences and formal education as non-research forms of evidence for making clinical decisions. 

 

On 9/18/2021 at 5:19 PM, sleepwalker said:

The degree rarely results in a pay increase (if any) significant enough to warrant obtainment.

An advanced degree CAN open more doors (and windows) for someone with a resulting increase in pay.. In addition, there is the love of learning, which may not have anything to do with a salary increase. 

On 9/18/2021 at 5:19 PM, sleepwalker said:

I have more than enough degrees (2 Bachelor's, 3 Master's) and my FNP certificate

I can understand your frustration however. I think a more linear pathway into a terminal degree would provide a better return on investment than several degrees at the same educational level. 

On 5/21/2021 at 12:04 AM, Mnstn said:

I'm comfortable potentially using the time to do another clinic position or utilizing my masters degree in a public health nursing aspect.

I think this might have a better outcome for you...look for someplace with tuition reimbursement or someplace you could do your DNP final project. Best wishes on your future.