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9 months into FIRST FNP job

Posted

Specializes in Cardiac, Home Health, Primary Care. Has 6 years experience.

I updated a few months ago because I always searched these forums for anything to show me the light at the end. Here's another update:

I am about 9 months into my first FNP position. I could have cooked a baby at this point in time but, instead, all I got was a poodle. Anyway...

I am able to run through some rooms without my phone to triple checks dosages and tests. I haven't killed anybody (that I know of). I have some regular patients who comment on my new haircut and thank me for helping them. I feel like I'm getting an entire city caught up on PAP smears (since there aren't any full time local OBGYNs and my partner in the office is a young male physician).

I feel like I have learned sooooo much in these last few months it's unreal. I THOUGHT school stuffed my head full of knowledge but it's finally really clicking.

I still look up plenty. Refresh myself before a patient by glancing at an algorithm.

At this point I'm really seeing medicine (oh, uh, ahem...advanced practice nursing) as doable. I think I will eventually be like some of my favorite preceptors who I aspire to be. To be as knowledgable as my physician counterparts but still have my nurse-y ways.

I passed that dang test 10 months ago but I'm still studying almost daily to better understand what I'm doing.

For NP students: you will finish.

For new NP's: you will feel more confident.

Just give it some time!

sailornurse

Specializes in ER/Tele, Med-Surg, Faculty, Urgent Care. Has 39 years experience.

Yes the first year or two can be uncomfortable. There will come the day when you show up for work with coffee in hand & digging at the bottom of your purse for a pen, grab a stethescope and go. You won't be looking up stuff, soon you will go the entire day without looking up anything at all. Keep us posted.

anh06005, MSN, APRN, NP

Specializes in Cardiac, Home Health, Primary Care. Has 6 years experience.

I'm hopeful and know I'll get there eventually! I'm still tweaking to incorporate more EBP, recommendations, etc. because it's tough knowing ALLLLL of them at one time.

MallysMama

Specializes in ICU. Has 6 years experience.

Thanks for sharing your update!! Congrats on becoming more proficient. I love reading posts like these! They help me see that not only is there a light at the end of the tunnel- but that it's attainable!

anh06005, MSN, APRN, NP

Specializes in Cardiac, Home Health, Primary Care. Has 6 years experience.

Thanks for sharing your update!! Congrats on becoming more proficient. I love reading posts like these! They help me see that not only is there a light at the end of the tunnel- but that it's attainable!

That's why I am trying to update every few months!

I loved reading the updates too.

Thank you so much for this post! I am 4 months into my first FNP job and feel like a guppy in the ocean! I only work 15 hours a week, which makes learning a lot longer as well. Your post makes me feel less incompetent and more in tune with doing the best with the experience I have. Knowing that everyone goes through this learning curve and that it does get better is very reassuring! :)

noyesno, MSN, APRN, NP

Specializes in Family Medicine. Has 11 years experience.

Love this update. Thanks so much for sharing. I just started FNP school and do not see the light at the end of the tunnel.

I found your post extremely helpful and encouraging.

noyesno, MSN, APRN, NP

Specializes in Family Medicine. Has 11 years experience.

Oh, and congrats on the poodle! :)

Thank you for your post. I am 7 months in and there are days I barely have time to breath. In fact, it's been a year since I passed boards. Never thought I would be here. It's totally worth it. Please keep the updates coming. Hearing others experiences helps when you are feeling overwhelmed.

Thanks for sharing... my first nine months is just around the corner and I am eager and freaking all at once..

You will be done before you know it. School seems like it will never end. It is worth all the hard work. Being a FNP is the best job. Know that the feelings of being overwhelmed is normal. Just remember you are not alone.

anh06005, MSN, APRN, NP

Specializes in Cardiac, Home Health, Primary Care. Has 6 years experience.

You will be done before you know it. School seems like it will never end. It is worth all the hard work. Being a FNP is the best job. Know that the feelings of being overwhelmed is normal. Just remember you are not alone.

Absolutely! I see so many posts on Facebook in the NP groups I'm in about feeling overwhelmed as student or new NP. It is absolutely normal! Just like being nervous as a new RN but as a NP you don't usually get as much orientation as you probably did as a RN and the responsibility is so much more. Get a few good resources (I personally love 5 Minute Clinical Consult and Lexicomp) and don't be afraid to ask questions! Oh and the CDC has some pretty great apps about STD's and choosing antibiotics.

ksenakim

Specializes in Family Practice, Urgent Care, Medsurg. Has 3 years experience.

Wow.

I'm currently in my second to last term of my FNP program and the stress/anxiety/weight of everything I don't know makes me regret having applied sometimes. This post gives me hope. Thank you.

BostonFNP, APRN

Specializes in Adult Internal Medicine. Has 10 years experience.

I still look up plenty. Refresh myself before a patient by glancing at an algorithm.

That's ok! In fact you should be looking things up all the time, we all should, that is part of maintaining your practice. I work with a colleague who has been a physician for more than 40 years and he uses UpToDate and reads journals as much as I do.

It sounds like you are nearly fully transitioned into the role, congrats.

Usually about this time is when novice NPs have their first run in with an error or a missed diagnosis, and if/when that happens, remember that no provider catches everything or is fully free of mistakes. This is a job that tends to humble you as soon as you get too confident.

I constantly am looking things up. I use my epocrates and drug calculations in the room with the patient. The patients appreciate that I am taking the extra time. I rather take a few extra minutes than have to have an error.

anh06005, MSN, APRN, NP

Specializes in Cardiac, Home Health, Primary Care. Has 6 years experience.

That's ok! In fact you should be looking things up all the time, we all should, that is part of maintaining your practice. I work with a colleague who has been a physician for more than 40 years and he uses UpToDate and reads journals as much as I do.

It sounds like you are nearly fully transitioned into the role, congrats.

Usually about this time is when novice NPs have their first run in with an error or a missed diagnosis, and if/when that happens, remember that no provider catches everything or is fully free of mistakes. This is a job that tends to humble you as soon as you get too confident.

I hate that we are human but it's reality I suppose. I'm hopeful in the next year or so I can get off of my Lexapro I started my last semester. I'm too tightly wound with all of these changes the last year or so.

BostonFNP, APRN

Specializes in Adult Internal Medicine. Has 10 years experience.

I hate that we are human but it's reality I suppose. I'm hopeful in the next year or so I can get off of my Lexapro I started my last semester. I'm too tightly wound with all of these changes the last year or so.

It will always be a humbling job; just when you think you've got it, it turns you on your head.

I appreciate that everyone is so opened about this transition. So many act like this is the easiest job. I finally am realizing it's ok to admit this a stressful time. We will get through this.