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Minor in spanish? How long will it take?

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I was thinking of minoring in spanish. Does anyone know how long that will take? Is this a good idea? My semesters might be kind of heavy because of the sciences. I initially planned to finish all of my pre-reqs in a year. But it looks like I'm probably going to need an extra semester.

These are the classes I need:

microbio

pathophysi

chem

pharm

stats

sociology

fine arts appreciation

anthropology

general elective

issues and perspectives course?

upper division bioethics?

I have been taking most of my non science classes online and have had no problem, so I planned on taking the rest online as well.

Should I drop the idea of taking up spanish if my plan is to start nursing in a year?

Edited by ilikecorgis

Red Kryptonite

Specializes in hospice. Has 3 years experience.

Being bilingual in Spanish will increase your value in the job market, exponentially in some places, like California, Texas. Arizona, etc.

Taking any Spanish classes will be an advantage. As Red Kryptonite stated, it will increase your marketability. I'm going to be taking an online Spanish class while taking my nursing classes (fingers crossed that it won't be too bad). Knowing any level of Spanish is valuable these days.

anie10

Specializes in TCU, Post-surgical, Infection Prevention. Has 2 years experience.

It might increase your marketability... It may not. I have an AA in Spanish (not a minor, earned with 3 other degrees) and I live in California (SoCal) and it hasn't done me a bit of good. No one cares, because I do not look Latina (because I aint, lol)

What it will do is ensure you surpass the 12 credit threshhold, ensuring you get full financial aid (full pell grant) if eligible.

Rose_Queen, BSN, MSN, RN

Specializes in OR, education. Has 16 years experience.

It might increase your marketability... It may not.

Agree with this. I minored in Spanish (and the classes were nowhere near enough to be fluent, especially medical terminology); however, my facility requires an interpreter to be used when conducting a lot of patient care. These interpreters must pass a test given by the facility. As someone who is most definitely not 100% fluent, my chances of passing the test are slim. Additionally, in many areas where you will find a Spanish-speaking patient population, you are going to find a native Spanish-speaking population as well. Being able to speak the language may not make you stand out above other applicants.

However, if it's a rewarding experience to you to learn another language, plus offers a guarantee of being a full time student, go for it for the personal satisfaction.

My school offers Spanish for Health Professionals 1 and 2, which is really all I plan on taking. I took Spanish 1 and 2 in HS, so I know the basics. All I really want is enough to communicate if need be. Now ASL, that is something I'm very interested in learning.

anie10

Specializes in TCU, Post-surgical, Infection Prevention. Has 2 years experience.

However, if it's a rewarding experience to you to learn another language, plus offers a guarantee of being a full time student, go for it for the personal satisfaction.

I concur. I was fluent in German, upon my return to the US and found that being on the West Coast, my linguistic ability did me little good. However, knowing German made Spanish easier with all those fun feminine/masculine/neutral rules and such ~ all the sexy stuff we don't have in English.

I agree with the poster wanting to lear ASL ~ that's worthwhile...