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Minor EMT

Posted

This probably sounds like a stupid question, but is it possible to minor in EMT and get a certificate in EMT while majoring in nursing? What I mean by this is, if someone applies to the nursing program but doesn't get in, is it a good idea to try to get a certificate in EMT before applying again to the nursing program.

JustBeachyNurse, RN

Specializes in Complex pediatrics turned LTC/subacute geriatrics. Has 11 years experience.

EMT training can be completed in 2 weeks full time or 6-8 weeks part time evening. EMS runs under the medical model of care using physician protocols, not the nursing model of care. I've never seen EMT/EMS as a collegiate minor (or major) as it's community/vocational training.

CNA is often more helpful for nursing than EMT.

Alex Egan, LPN, EMT-B

Specializes in Home Health (PDN), Camp Nursing. Has 9 years experience.

In pa the course hours are a bit longer. EMT training is provided through the community collage, however credit hours are only issued if the student enrolls in the Paramedic program.

I use my phone, to type, I work at night, and I'm a bad speller. Pick any reason you want for my misspellings

EMT training can be completed in 2 weeks full time or 6-8 weeks part time evening. EMS runs under the medical model of care using physician protocols, not the nursing model of care. I've never seen EMT/EMS as a collegiate minor (or major) as it's community/vocational training.

CNA is often more helpful for nursing than EMT.

It used to be 100 hours of classroom time in NYS. Two weeks full-time wouldn't do it.....it might even be longer now, not sure.

But in any event, it's not a college curriculum by any stretch.

JustBeachyNurse, RN

Specializes in Complex pediatrics turned LTC/subacute geriatrics. Has 11 years experience.

To clarify the two weeks full time was 8-4 M-F and two 12hr weekend shifts plus ride along & 18hts ER

HouTx, BSN, MSN, EdD

Specializes in Critical Care, Education. Has 35 years experience.

Just a point of clarification. Despite the fact that both may perform the same types of tasks, EMT scope of practice is completely different than nursing. EMT practice does NOT include inpatient care... so that's why a CNA is considered more beneficial.

Alex Egan, LPN, EMT-B

Specializes in Home Health (PDN), Camp Nursing. Has 9 years experience.

I will say as someone who was an EMT before nursing. I got a lot out of it. The NREMT exam is a lot of prioritization and which is the best correct answer style of questions so the NCLEX wasn't totally foreign to me when I got there. I learnt a lot about assessment and basic anatomy, that I know are not taught with such vigor in CNA education. I also had aggressive instructors and preceptors which makes a huge difference in what you get out of the class. For me it worked. If I had been a CNA I would never have been a nurse. If it's something you really want go for it, but if your thinking it will make you very much more marketable as a nurse that is defiantly not the case. A CNA job at the local hospital will do you better.

I use my phone, to type, I work at night, and I'm a bad speller. Pick any reason you want for my misspellings