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smf0903, RN 13,161 Views

Joined: Sep 7, '13; Posts: 835 (69% Liked) ; Likes: 2,724

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  • Nov 15

    He will lawyer up and they will plead down whatever the criminal charge ends up being to something with probation.

    Hopefully, the nurse has a lawyer and she is already putting in the paper work for a civil suit. "I have no intent to get money from you for choking me, I'm just suing your crazy ass. See how that works?"

  • Nov 15

    Who cares what alarms were beeping?

    Who cares what a great guy he was? Or if he had a temper issue?

    Who cares whether he had "intent?"

    He.still.strangled.a.nurse.

    If he came across a woman in the mall and did the same, there would be more outrage.

    Poor guy just snapped, that's all. What about the poor nurse?

  • Nov 15

    "I think it will be easy to show there was no intent involved," he told CBS4.
    Way to take responsibility.

    What a tool. I wanted to use another word, but I'd get in trouble.

  • Nov 15

    Quote from psu_213
    For me, the idea that "he snapped" is more of an explanation that an excuse. I think he did snap, but that does not excuse his behavior, and he deserves every bit of punishment he gets--probably more.

    Was there an anger issue before or a history of borderline behavior that people let go as "oh, that is just the way Dr. So-and-so is." The lesson for other places is if you see this behavior escalating, stop him/her right there before they "snap." If there was that H/O angry behavior, than it is everyone's fault--nurses, admin, fellow doctors, etc.--for not stepping in sooner to prevent something like this.
    By all accounts he was "a great guy."

    I know this may be hitting some people in the feel because of certain past situations pertaining to AN, but come on. Come ON.
    He choked a nurse because she told him what to do.

  • Nov 15

    Quoted from the article ,"I just didn't mean to hurt her."

    That to me shows intent. He strangled her but "didn't mean to hurt her".

    What did he want to do? Shut her up? Force her to comply to his wants?

    He needs to be locked up. I don't care what his rationale is, it's never okay to physically attack someone.

  • Nov 15

    Quote from psu_213
    Sadly, I agree. Plus, I can be outraged even if I don't march down the street and yell and scream....or type in ALL CAPS, I suppose.
    I have enough for us all.
    It isn't the lack of caps. It is the excuses for why the perp may have done it that is grinding my gears.

  • Nov 15

    I would have kicked him in the jewels, repeatedly. Holy crow, I am stunned by this! How awful for that nurse. He needs incarceration or therapy. Both. Incarcertherapy. You lay hands on me and I am going full ginger-snap.

  • Nov 15

    Quote from pixierose
    Oh goody. He retired.

    He seems quite blasé about the whole thing in the article and seems to place the blame on the nurses: "they don't seem to know the dangers of alarm fatigue ..."

    There is never, ever an excuse to put your hands on someone, never mind strangling someone to the point of unconsciousness.

    There needs to be more outrage. This should not be a norm.
    Yeah, what a strange thing to say. I don't think anyone knows the dangers of alarm fatigue as well as nurses do!

    I'm also a little surprised at some of the passes given to him on this thread.

    Only the people who work with him know if this was a mental snap or if he is known for jerkish behavior. Whatever it was, he doesn't need to be doing his job anymore.

    He didn't have "any intention"... Intention for what? Letting go of her neck? Letting her live?

  • Nov 15

    Quote from pixierose
    Oh goody. He retired.

    He seems quite blasé about the whole thing in the article and seems to place the blame on the nurses: "they don't seem to know the dangers of alarm fatigue ..."

    There is never, ever an excuse to put your hands on someone, never mind strangling someone to the point of unconsciousness.

    There needs to be more outrage. This should not be a norm.
    No one is even outraged on this thread. Nurses are our own worst enemies.

  • Nov 15

    Oh goody. He retired.

    He seems quite blasé about the whole thing in the article and seems to place the blame on the nurses: "they don't seem to know the dangers of alarm fatigue ..."

    There is never, ever an excuse to put your hands on someone, never mind strangling someone to the point of unconsciousness.

    There needs to be more outrage. This should not be a norm.

  • Nov 15

    Quote from Davey Do
    Karmic law? "Throw the book at him" and hit him in the throat?
    I don't care where you hit him. How dare he? "Snapped"?
    Give me a break. There has been well known documented cases of abuse towards nurses for years.
    I don't care why he did it.

  • Nov 15
  • Nov 15

    He's lucky that no one went up side his head with whatever letter of 02 cylinder was handy. If my coworker is to the point hay they are being checked out, all bets are off

  • Nov 1

    It's these sorts of errors where we often seem to miss the forest for the trees. The problem isn't the safest way to store, draw up, and administer a heparin flush in a transduced arterial line, the problem is that there is no reason for flushing these lines with heparin in the first place. There is no benefit in terms of patency, and no reason to believe there would benefit since heparin is not a thrombolytic, and once it's been instilled into the line as a flush it will quickly be pushed through by the continuous flow of fluid from the pressure bag through the transducer.

    The best solution to this scenario is to stop figuring out safest way to do something that even when done correctly has no benefit and only poses the potential for harm, and just don't do it at all.

  • Nov 1

    I've never heard of flushing an art line with heparin. Is that a standard practice?


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