Latest Comments by racingmurse320q

racingmurse320q 1,096 Views

Joined: Nov 29, '12; Posts: 25 (16% Liked) ; Likes: 12

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    In 7 days I went from the wait list to being accepted. Stay on top of the admissions coordinators to make sure you're being looked at/moved up the list.

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    Got the email today...wait listed.

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    Just waiting patiently and thinking that every new incoming email could be the one. Surely by tomorrow we will know something since we will be approaching the 6 week mark.

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    My email that I have states that notification will be made 6-8 weeks from Frontier Bound date. That would mean somewhere around mid-late January hopefully. Oddly enough 8 weeks would be Jan. 4th, which is the application deadline.

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    Anyone applying for Frontier class 148? I've turned in all of the paperwork and application for FNP and now playing the waiting game. I haven't found another thread specifically for this class but if there is one, can someone please send me in the right direction?

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    YoAdrienne216 likes this.

    Wyoming is a traditional 16 week semester. All classes are online, no clinical component. The classes can be taken one at a time or you can double or triple up if you can swing that with work or other life commitments. The classes are a mixture of some tests and papers but are mostly scholarly research papers near the end of the program. The capstone course is a proposed or real intervention that you create, research, present, and possibly implement; my final paper was 20+ pages. Unfortunately out of state tuition costs have risen dramatically and are now $300+ per credit hour, I snuck in at the $180-$220 range. Good luck!

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    poppycat, ICUman, and YoAdrienne216 like this.

    I can vouch for University of Wyoming, just finished my RN-BSN on Friday. I live in Kentucky found that the program was still rather affordable for me compared to other similar programs and the "for profit" programs. Finished in 2 years but probably could've done sooner if I were better with statistics. Check it out and you won't be disappointed.

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    I would be interested in seeing other replies on this issue. The occasional 3:1 for a nurse in the unit happens, but daily for over half the staff seems unacceptable. It's a burnout/compassion fatigue issue for me, but legally I would like to see what, if any, implications there are. We had this conversation the other day in our unit and one of the nurses claimed that they had been reported for this not long ago.

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    2bAngilRN, beshacohen, poppycat, and 4 others like this.

    I've been saying this for a while. I appreciate my nursing assistants for what they do but I do not appreciate it when they call themselves nurses or see people I know who are NA's call themselves nurses on social media.

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    Quote from naptimeRN
    Are you willing and okay to go back to the higher stress or is it becoming to much and burning you totally out?
    I really feel like the 5 days a week of clinic life and the monotony involved is burning me out. I actually worked in ICU yesterday and it was absolutely insane, not because anyone was crashing, but because I had 2 transfers and then picked up a patient and admitted another after 3:30. I enjoyed it because I felt like I was doing stuff all day that was making a difference and the patients were very appreciative (I know not all of them are however). I really though working M-F with weekends and holidays was great but I have noticed that I have no time to get anything accomplished during the week and was having to crash early every night so I could get up and get to work the next day. 3 12's are great for allowing me time to get things completed, especially my BSN schoolwork. Not to mention my wife and I really like to do things and the hospital schedule allows more scheduling flexibility to have time off without ever using vacation or taking off early and losing hours. All of the things that I thought were so bad when I left ended up not meaning that much when I saw them from another perspective. I think all of this has made me realize what fits my personality best and that nursing is just a job that is going to involve high stress and I'm going to have to handle it. The doors of opportunity are much wider as an ICU nurse than they are as a nurse in the clinic, and I want those doors to be there incase I ever want them.

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    Thanks for the reply. Money really isn't the issue because I'm getting paid roughly the same as I did in the hospital. There is an itch to go back because I enjoyed the hands on aspect of it all and the critical thinking involved. At the clinic, not really much critical thinking is involved as the doctors primarily deal directly with the patients.

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    Background: I took a job right out of my ADN in the ICU, a job that I dreamed about through school. After I got there I realized it wasn't all I had made it out to be in my head even though I loved the hands on application of my nursing skills and the patient population and learning opportunities. I took a job at a very busy local clinic working for 3 physicians of 14 in the practice but remained PRN at the hospital. The work is much less stressful, however, after some time there I have this urge to go back to the ICU. I think this is due in part to the monotony of having a new pt every 10 minutes from 8-5, M-F and also the fact that I feel more like a helper instead of THE nurse. Also, this practice uses mostly LPN's and CMA's (much like other office settings) and there is not really a great divide as far as tasks that can be performed there and the pay grade. Actually, there are several "primary nurses" that are CMA's and are technically higher up the chain and make more money than I do. I do not mean to sound egotistical, however, I worked hard for my license to practice as an RN so that my position and salary would reflect it. I just have that itch to go back and really make a difference but I really am torn.

    I would just like to get some feedback from nurses who have been around the block and can help me clear thoughts in my head.

    Thanks in advance!

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    I've got 2 more shifts of orientation and then I'm on my own. I feel like I've gained a lot of confidence through the orientation process but I know I've got a long way to go. I've already had run ins with those arrogant, egotistical physicians and it's made me realize I've got to have tough skin. Good luck to everyone!

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    I really think its ultimately a program by program type of thing. In my area we have a community college and a University that both offer degrees in nursing and in this particular case, the CC has a more prestigious program and higher pass rates for the NCLEX than the university does. I don't think it would be fair to say that as a whole one is more relaxed or easier than the other because every program has different standards and different experience levels of faculty that are doing the teaching. The best thing to do is just research the programs you are interested in and make a decision based on the best fit for your individual situation.

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    Sorry about that, you fixed it before my reply was posted.


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