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sarolaRN, ASN, RN 5,616 Views

Joined: Jan 24, '12; Posts: 271 (43% Liked) ; Likes: 352
from US

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  • Feb 7

    Not a single person in my graduating class of May ‘17 got a hospital job as an ASN in NY, Including a few with YEARS of LPN experience. A few of us were lucky enough to get inpatient rehab positions, but I don't know anyone that managed to get into the hospitals regardless of having a bachelors degree in another subject and regardless of already being enrolled in a BSN program. Two got hospital jobs in FL. If you have Acute care experience you'll have a better chance, but NYC standard seems to be BSN now.

  • Oct 18 '17

    RN shortage? Where? If facilities would hire ADNs, there wouldn't be a shortage. This sounds like trying to make the most of a budget to me, which will be at the expense of the RNs already on the job.

  • Oct 15 '17

    RN shortage? Where? If facilities would hire ADNs, there wouldn't be a shortage. This sounds like trying to make the most of a budget to me, which will be at the expense of the RNs already on the job.

  • Oct 11 '17

    RN shortage? Where? If facilities would hire ADNs, there wouldn't be a shortage. This sounds like trying to make the most of a budget to me, which will be at the expense of the RNs already on the job.

  • Oct 6 '17

    RN shortage? Where? If facilities would hire ADNs, there wouldn't be a shortage. This sounds like trying to make the most of a budget to me, which will be at the expense of the RNs already on the job.

  • Sep 24 '17

    RN shortage? Where? If facilities would hire ADNs, there wouldn't be a shortage. This sounds like trying to make the most of a budget to me, which will be at the expense of the RNs already on the job.

  • Sep 23 '17

    RN shortage? Where? If facilities would hire ADNs, there wouldn't be a shortage. This sounds like trying to make the most of a budget to me, which will be at the expense of the RNs already on the job.

  • Sep 23 '17

    RN shortage? Where? If facilities would hire ADNs, there wouldn't be a shortage. This sounds like trying to make the most of a budget to me, which will be at the expense of the RNs already on the job.

  • Sep 23 '17

    RN shortage? Where? If facilities would hire ADNs, there wouldn't be a shortage. This sounds like trying to make the most of a budget to me, which will be at the expense of the RNs already on the job.

  • Sep 22 '17

    RN shortage? Where? If facilities would hire ADNs, there wouldn't be a shortage. This sounds like trying to make the most of a budget to me, which will be at the expense of the RNs already on the job.

  • Sep 22 '17

    RN shortage? Where? If facilities would hire ADNs, there wouldn't be a shortage. This sounds like trying to make the most of a budget to me, which will be at the expense of the RNs already on the job.

  • Sep 22 '17

    RN shortage? Where? If facilities would hire ADNs, there wouldn't be a shortage. This sounds like trying to make the most of a budget to me, which will be at the expense of the RNs already on the job.

  • Aug 31 '17

    I'm a new grad from an ADN program in the Northeast- where all the hospitals are magnet and BSN is standard. ADN is akin to a diploma program (which are nearly extinct, I think). It's harder to find work up here and finding a position in a hospital will pretty much only happen if you're already working there or know someone very well who can hook you up. In the Southeast, it's a bit different. I considered relocating to FL to find work and was actually offered 4 interviews when I only applied to 6 jobs. Up here I applied to about 160 jobs and had 2 interviews.
    You're in a program already. Finish your program and jump into an RN to BSN after. You will likely find work in a hospital and maybe even on a specialized unit where you are. Many hospitals ask that you obtain your BSN within x years of hire, and if it's 5 years, then you work for a year and see if your hospital offers tuition assistance.
    Stay in your program, do well, and go about your career path. An ADN will not hinder your opportunity to later become an NP. Don't let the BSN folk turn their nose up at you, they just take a few more liberal arts classes and nursing theory classes. If it were that different, we wouldn't be sitting for the same NCLEX. Also, you might not be able to transfer your nursing credits if you decide to leave your program so just stick it out and do a bridge later.

  • Aug 31 '17

    I'm a new grad from an ADN program in the Northeast- where all the hospitals are magnet and BSN is standard. ADN is akin to a diploma program (which are nearly extinct, I think). It's harder to find work up here and finding a position in a hospital will pretty much only happen if you're already working there or know someone very well who can hook you up. In the Southeast, it's a bit different. I considered relocating to FL to find work and was actually offered 4 interviews when I only applied to 6 jobs. Up here I applied to about 160 jobs and had 2 interviews.
    You're in a program already. Finish your program and jump into an RN to BSN after. You will likely find work in a hospital and maybe even on a specialized unit where you are. Many hospitals ask that you obtain your BSN within x years of hire, and if it's 5 years, then you work for a year and see if your hospital offers tuition assistance.
    Stay in your program, do well, and go about your career path. An ADN will not hinder your opportunity to later become an NP. Don't let the BSN folk turn their nose up at you, they just take a few more liberal arts classes and nursing theory classes. If it were that different, we wouldn't be sitting for the same NCLEX. Also, you might not be able to transfer your nursing credits if you decide to leave your program so just stick it out and do a bridge later.

  • Aug 27 '17

    I'm a new grad from an ADN program in the Northeast- where all the hospitals are magnet and BSN is standard. ADN is akin to a diploma program (which are nearly extinct, I think). It's harder to find work up here and finding a position in a hospital will pretty much only happen if you're already working there or know someone very well who can hook you up. In the Southeast, it's a bit different. I considered relocating to FL to find work and was actually offered 4 interviews when I only applied to 6 jobs. Up here I applied to about 160 jobs and had 2 interviews.
    You're in a program already. Finish your program and jump into an RN to BSN after. You will likely find work in a hospital and maybe even on a specialized unit where you are. Many hospitals ask that you obtain your BSN within x years of hire, and if it's 5 years, then you work for a year and see if your hospital offers tuition assistance.
    Stay in your program, do well, and go about your career path. An ADN will not hinder your opportunity to later become an NP. Don't let the BSN folk turn their nose up at you, they just take a few more liberal arts classes and nursing theory classes. If it were that different, we wouldn't be sitting for the same NCLEX. Also, you might not be able to transfer your nursing credits if you decide to leave your program so just stick it out and do a bridge later.



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