Latest Comments by sallypz

sallypz 1,140 Views

Joined: Nov 27, '09; Posts: 10 (30% Liked) ; Likes: 5

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  • 0

    C.O.D.'s LPN program only takes 40 students and they have about 125 apply for those 40 positions. They have a tough job deciding who gets in. If you are on the alternate list there is still a chance, although perhaps slim, that you might still get in. Typically one or two people drop out before the January class begins. But you might want to look at your other options also.
    True their RN program is not currently accredited..they are working to change that situation. But until they do their RN program might not be your best bet...especially if you want to go on for BSN or higher degree. Chamberland seems to be a popular alternative because they start classes 3 times a year. I think they have financial aid counselors there to help you figure out how to afford it.
    The suburban community colleges have very limited enrollment in their nursing classes..most like C.O.D. take less than 40 students in their nursing classes. As far as I understand it they do not have plans to increase the number of students in each class anytime soon.
    Good Luck. I hope you find a program.

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    Sorry to disagree...CNAs typically have an 8 week program with minimal nursing education..the State of Illinois requires they only know how to do 21 different things (transferring, bathing)..see the website Illinois Nurse Aide Testing - Performance Skills Videos for Illinois list of CNA skills. CNAs are taught very little assessment skills, nor can they pass meds, give injections, regulate IVs, insert NG tubes as a LPN does. Those things simply are not in the list of skills a CNA is taught in Illinois.
    Some hospitals do hire LPNs and some do not. The differing factor probably is whether or not the hospital is seeking "Magnet Status". To acquire Magnet Status on of the requirements is an all RN staff...which, unfortunately does not mean only RNs work there...Magnet Hospitals also hire Nurse Assistants which they might call CNAs, PCTs or by some other title.
    Currently, because of the economy, it is very difficult to get into a ADN program...many people applying into the ADN programs have degrees in other fields, some even Masters Degrees, and because of job shortages are now going back to school for nursing..so competition for spots in the ADN programs is tough. It might be easier to get into a LPN program right now than it would be to get into an ADN program. If you live in Naperville you are in DuPage County and the College of DuPage does offer a 1 year LPN program. They only accept 40 students into the program a year. The 2011 semester starts January and that class is full. If you wish to get into the 2012 class begin applying right now (Dec 2010) because they decide on the final 40 LPN candidates about 6 months before the class begins. So apply early.
    College of DuPage also has a ADN program which accepts about 30 or so students a year only....and while it is a good program, they are not currently an accreteded (sorry about the misspelling) school. Your other choice of Community school is Elgin Community College which is in Kane County. They have a RN (ADN) program (no specific LPN program) however students can take the LPN exam after completing the first year of the program. Their admission too, is very limited, probably also about 30 to 40 students a year.
    Contrary to what a few others have said, there are currently only a few "Bridge Programs" for LPN to RN...some are currently "on hold" for applicants because most only accept an applicant if someone drops out of the second year of their ADN program..so spots are rare indeed. There is only one on-line LPN to RN program in the Midwest right now..and it is located in Indiana. So there are really not that many 'Bridge Programs" out there at this time. (I have been researching this topic for some of my students recently)
    There are also 4 programs in Illinois that offer an entry level Masters Degree program to persons that have a College Degree in other fields. After these students complete the Masters Program then they take the Illinois state test for RN licensure. (UIC: RUSH; MIllikin; an West Suburban--although I could not find the specific info on West Suburban's web site--so I'm not sure if their Masters entry level program still exists).
    Of course, there are also some private schools out there that have both LPN programs and/or RN programs available.
    As for jobs for LPN, although it may be difficult to find a LPN job at a Hospital, there are a few still out there. If you are looking for experience related to acuity of care, your best bet might be in a Skilled Care unit. Some Skilled Care units have IV's, NG tubes, dialysis patients, post op heart surg patients etc...
    Good Luck. Hope the info has helped a bit.

  • 0

    Interesting forum. I have been looking for information on a nursing specialty in the USA for developmentally disabled children but have found little here. In 2005 I adopted a small child with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS). She has cognitive delays (the current politically correct verbage for Mental Retardation) and some emotional/behavioral problems. Alcohol use during pregnancy is the leading cause of Mental Retardation in the USA (and probably in the world)...it is also the only cause of Mental Retardation that is 100% preventable. FAS is a little recognized problem that was only recognized as a medical diagnosis in 1976. Research has found that mild alcohol consumption during pregnancy (sometimes as little as 2 drinks) also has adverse effect on the developing fetus' brain and can cause cognitive delays...so the problem is not only for heavy drinkers...but for any pregnant woman who consumes any alcohol. My own cognitively delayed daughter will probably never be able to function independently in society. FAS is brain damage that is permenant and can never heal. And, from what I've read about children who grow up with unrecognized FAS, many of them do so badly at trying to adjust to society with a damaged brain that doesn't understand the rules that they end up in jail, or worse, victimized, abused, or dead.
    In another line that would be applicable to disability nursing, in the past few years the number of children that have autism has increased by over 6 fold. (There is even a TV commercial stating this fact.) So along with the medical demands that the aging of America (Baby Boomers growing older) are going to place on the medical system and nursing, if thae trends in the increases in the occurance of autism in the population continue it will also place huge demands (and needs) on the future of the medical (and nursing) field. However, surprisingly, so far I have seen little in literature recognizing this fact....and no training in nursing schools preparing our future nurses for this population in need of services.
    Well, I didn't mean to ramble on..just to say this is an important field of nursing that is very underdeveloped in the USA.

  • 0

    Wow!! My sympathies. It sounds like you unintentionally bit off a little bit more than you could chew. I started teaching at as community college vocational nursing Clinical Instructor last semester. Despite the fact that my clinicals were only two days a week--it was still a huge amount of work--lots of clinical assignments to read, comment on etc...then too, I like to have some focus for each clinical--last semester since we were in a LTC facility the focus was Gerentology--normal aging vs the Frail Elderly--common meds and conditions in the elderly, teamwork, and moving from a CNA thinking mode to a more professional thinking mode--so that made designing the clinical experience a little more challenging and time consuming. I, too ran into one student that accused me of being "racist" (despite the fact that we're the same color)--it gave me quite a shock--and cause to for self-examination---that was until I found out that when any instructor corrected her of anything she retorted with the same accusation of "racism". Her defense mechanism---not my actions. The rest of the students were a pleasure.
    I wanted to teach in a classroom setting also. So this Summer I did. Just today completed an 8 week course teaching CNA's at a community college. Despite the fact that it was "only CNA's" it was still a lot of work. The classes were 4 days a week, 4 hours a day. After class every evening until about midnight I'd be preparing for the next day's class. It was exhausting. Luckily the textbook came with a set of power points for the instructor--and I had resources to obtain some more colorful ones---and the school had a nice library of videos to use in conjuction with lectures. The instructors resources for the text also came with a test generator program that was a great help. I don't think I'd have survived it if I hadn't had some background in teaching--Long, long ago, before my nursing life, I took a couple education courses toward a teaching degree for High School Biology (did not complete the degree)--and have done extensive patient teaching of home care skills--and taught a few lectures in a CNA course about 15 years ago--I called upon all that experience. I. too, put my work on a MSN degree on hold for the summer because I knew even an 8 week first timer, full time teaching job was going to be a Bear. This, too, is suppose to be as college course...the students are college students, get 7 college credit hours for the course, and have taken other college courses previously.....but I agree, I was surprised at the level of immaturity of many of the students....one, in particular gave me a bad review on her instructor review, however, she was angry because she did badly on a test...a take home test that they had a week to do (could use their book and ask friends for help, or do as groups) she didn't do half the test, got a bad grade, then was angry at me for her bad grade on the test. Duh..kid....if you don't do half the test your grade on the test will show that!!!
    I think you're showing signs of a bit of 'burn out' (it sounds like you also have a whole lot of other stresses in your life that are leaving you emotionally drained right now too). Perhaps what you need to do is take a short time, step back from the work situation and regroup yourself. Kudos for even trying a semester of teaching. But now, catch your breath and regroup. Think about it..is the classroom teaching situation what you want to do at this time? You know you could always go back to your original plan..teach only clinicals while you go for your MSN. Even at the same school if you want.. You simply have to tell the school something, too much life stress right now for classroom teaching, or it doesn't fit in with your own school schedule....whatever...you know if you don't want to you don't even have to tell them how upset the classroom experience made you... Or perhaps you might want to look into doing something like I'm doing....teaching CNA's while I go for the MSN. (My next semester of teaching I hope to resume my MSN studies). Simply find out what is required by your state to teach CNA's....you might have to take a short CNA Teacher Training course like I did before the state certifies you to teach CNA's. I look at it this way...even though I'm 'only teaching CNA's' it's still classroom teaching experience.
    Good luck. (Didn't intend to make this so long) I hope you find the right path for you. And like I said, Kudos for all the work you did...you did not fail..try to think of it as just an experience on your learning curve.

  • 1
    or.nurse likes this.

    Congrats on the job. I, too, teach in a LPN program...only clinicals at this time. (and I also teach a CNA course). First thing to do would be to get all the textbooks they use in the program & get the instructors copy. Then find out if there is any accompanying instructors resources that the publisher of the textbooks offer. Many companies offer a variety of things for instructors, including complete sets of power points that can be used in class. Also ask the school what resource materials they have in the department for instructors. They may have videos, DVDs for classroom on aspects of theory and clinical skills. Ask for the syllabus and clinical forms they will use. Then go on-line and search for instructor resources, either in general or break it down by specific subject area. Don't forget to look at sites like You-Tube for Nursing skills videos. Then organize what you have. Find a little area of your house to use as your 'office' area. I organize all my materials by semester in big notebooks, keeping my handouts and resources notes there too. Good luck...hope that helps to get you started.

    Sallypz

  • 0

    Thank you for the Math resources. This is my first semester teaching a LPN Clinical. My students just took the first of 8 dosage calculation quizzes in clinical. Using Dimensional Analysis is part of the quizzes. Most students did well, but there are a few that had problems. I will pass the resources along to them all.
    sallypz/MoxieMe

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    Yes, good idea. The school financial aid office would know about any scholarships that are specific to that school...as in scholarships from alumni of the program. I would also encourage graduates from programs to set up/contribute to scholarship funds at their schools, especially in these difficult economic times students need help.

    spz

  • 2
    showbizrn and diva_nurse like this.

    I am a BSN RN with over 30 years experience, med surg, Nursing Home, extended care, critical care step down out patient surgery, CNA Instructor, dialysis (both Hemo & PD), patient educator among others. Before I started in nursing I was going for a degree in secondary education (Biology). I am now returning to the Nursing Education side of nursing as a clinical instructor in an LPN program, and a clinical instructor in a CNA course. Both of those are part time and I'm looking for a 3rd part time Nursing Instructor job. I am also going back to school myself for a Nursing Masters. I plan on a dual focus FNP and Nurse Educator. Another part of my focus will be working in prevention/care of those with Fetal Alchol Syndrome. It is a field I have recently become very interested in because my my adopted daughter is a victim of FAS/FAE and in researching her condition I've noticed it is an underserved area of the Medical Field. Also I plan some focus of my study to be in Autism as some of my friends in education are indicating the child population with Autism is "exploding" in numbers.

    spz

  • 0

    If you do want to be a Certified Nurse Instructor before you go on for a MSN to teach in a RN program..first check out the requirements your state has to become a CNA instructor...you may be required to take some kind of State Approved training course first. Another avenue is to teach Clinical in an LPN program. Does the Hospital/company you work for have a Staff Education Department? Perhaps you could move into that Department for experience. Research Nursing Educator programs now to see if this really appeals to you. There are also some books asvailable on teaching in the clinical area I would recommend that before you teach in any clinical area you read one of them so that you know how to construct a clinical experience that is a focused, directional learning experience for students for any level of the nursing spectrum.

    spz

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    Some states have set up special funds for scholarships for Nurse Educators. Check with your state nursing Websites for info. However, as in my state, the economy has hit the State Government Scholarship funds also and in 2010 the scholarship fund for Nurse Educators is being cut.

    spz



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