Latest Comments by idahostudent2011

idahostudent2011 2,424 Views

Joined: Nov 25, '09; Posts: 79 (25% Liked) ; Likes: 32

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  • 0

    I have a question for all of you. I work in a 4 suite OR department and we do c-sections. We have been setting up one of our or rooms for an emergency c-section every night when we are done for the day. All we have is our pack on the back table and our c-section tray on a ring stand. This should work very well, but every morning our housekeepers come through and "dry" dust the rooms. The problem is that they dry dust with alcahol and whenever they wipe the table they put the pack back down, and there is still alcahol on the table. There is a worry of strike through(even though the pack is of course covered in plastic) What I was wondering do you leave your packs on the back table or do you set them somewhere for the "just in case the OB has to start the case without you" situation. There is no one here after 1700 exept for emergency cases. I was wondering what you all do in these cases, and if you have any evidence based research of this problem. thanks

  • 3
    Thought, nitenite, and Hygiene Queen like this.

    back to the genital stories, i was working as a scrub tech and some idiot came in with a "ring" on his buddy, that apparently had been there for at least 72 hrs according to the guy. We think that recreational drugs were involoved, his appendage was black...the urologist pretty much skinned it and he had to have skin grafts later on. Yes, not three days later another idiot came in with the same thing(drugs again) It sounded like he had that on for at least a week . Unfortunatly he ended up like Mr Bobitt, because there was no blood flow to that appendage, black as can be, lucky me, I was on call on both occaisions... That was extremely creepy...

  • 0

    Thank you for all your replies, it has been very helpful and insightful. I was able to go through an entire interview without resorting to my notes today. I still feel anxious going in and interviewing the pts, but it is getting better. I am getting smoother with the interview questions. This definatly has been a learning experence, and the most difficult part for me... the OR is my comfort zone

  • 0

    I am a new grad that is working in the OR. I was a scrub tech before so I am very comfortable in the OR setting. However, I am having some issues with the pre-op interview, I am getting all the points across, but I am feeling shy and the poor patients always catch on that I am nervous. I always say that I am a new grad and I usually have my preceptor with me who helps out when I need it, but I was wondering if anyone has any tips to help me get over my nervousness. Yes, I am new(fresh out of school) but I feel like I need to be on top of my game, since they did hire me(and I worked as a scrub tech at this hospital). I know I am being hard on myself, but the pre-op interview has me a little bit tongue tied! Thanks in advance!

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    At one hospital that I worked at had a cool thing that after the age of 55 they don't have to take call anymore. however, one nurse got fired for something or another and she filed a lawsuit for age discrimination. So there went the over 55 no call.

  • 3
    Scrubby, NurseSnarky, and rikomom like this.

    The first thing is take a step back and take a deep breath. The OR is a different beast. You are only a month into your orientation. There is a lot of stuff to remember, especially instrumentation. You will make mistakes, forget what you are doing in the middle of the case, contaminate sterile stuff accidently, even experenced nurses do that. Don't try to hurry, make sure every step is taken and don't let the doctors bug you. You still have a preceptor so pick her brain on how she puts the cases together and what she does to remember all the steps to the case. What you are going through is all a learning experence. Good luck!

  • 6

    I would be ativan, I would make everyone happy, sleepy, and forgetful!

  • 1
    greenfiremajick likes this.

    In middle school i wanted to be a vet,but I really didn't like seeing animals hurt. When I was in high school and beginning of college I wanted to be a professional horseback rider. My goal was to get to the olympics in three day eventing. I discovered through personal experence that being a professional wasn't as much fun as I thought it would be. I kind of fell into being a scrub tech, one of my riding friends suggested that I look into the program, thought it looked like fun, went through the program, was a CST for 8 years then went into nursing, well I made it through school, just waiting to take the nclex. Yes I still ride and compete, but it is for fun.

  • 1
    studentnurse5555 likes this.

    Anything over 70% you will be in the 90th percentile. I got a 83% and I was at the 99% the test wasn't that hard, just take your practice test and read all the rationales. Good luck!

  • 1
    nurse.sandi likes this.

    If you live in a small rural community, there is no way that you can avoid not knowing quite a few people on the floor. I always ask if they feel comfortable with me taking care of them, and they usually say they are glad that I am there and they don't mind. You can still be a professional. You just don't discuss their hospital visit when you see them next outside the hospital. However, if I did see them in the hallway and wasn't assigned to them I would say hi, but would not search them out, if they wanted me there they could say my room is such and such and if you have time you can drop by and see me, I would not drop by unannounced or if I wasn't invited. HIPAA is more on the lines of don't check out charts of people that you aren't assigned to or talk about what is going on with a patient when standing on an elevator..that type of thing....Not oh you can't talk to someone that you know in the hallway because that is a breach of confidentiality....(just don't look up their name in the system, you will get in trouble!)

  • 0

    As a scrub tech I always enjoyed doing big ortho fracture cases, each one different and it is really fun to figure out where all the pieces go. Another one that I enjoy doing are the spine cases. Especially spinal fusions. I do enjoy doing neuro, but unfortunatly I haven't been in on a crani case in several years, since I now live in a very rural area I really enjoyed the big vascular cases such as AAA, but fem pops were way too fiddly for me. Of course the big abd. cases are really fun, especally the big exonerations...not good for the pt, but very interesting to see the anatomy. I now am at a little hospital that does a lot of ACLs, spine and totals. I miss the big cases, but I got a job there as a new grad RN, so I will take it(and I'll still get to scrub and take scrub call!)

  • 0

    I graduate in may and was hired in the OR,...the best part is that I will get to scrub once in a while, that makes me very happy! Hopefully will get the NCLEX done as soon as possible....

  • 0

    Since you did do an externship in the OR, that is actually experence in the or, so they will look at you. However being a new grad it is pretty difficult to get in the or. But hey, I am still in nursing school and I just accepted an offer for a job in the OR as soon as I graduate, so there is hope! Good luck!

  • 0

    Thanks for the replys, that is a lot of help!

  • 2
    metal_m0nk and blackandyellow like this.

    Homeostatis is kind of like your thermostat at home. When the ambient air gets below a certain temp, the heat turns on. When it gets up to a certain temp it turns off. That is sort of what goes on in your body. So when you shiver you are actually warming up your body. When you sweat you are lowering your body temp.


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