Latest Comments by tahiti79

tahiti79 404 Views

Joined: Sep 28, '08; Posts: 5 (0% Liked)

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    After reading this topic I am a little bit disillusioned. It seems that roughly half of you are try your best to be compassionate and not judgemental, but it is the other half that concern me.
    I know that nurses get frustrated like everyone else, but I always had the ( apparently false) idea that the majority of nurse were above all else compassionate.
    I guess I really have a lot to be thankful for that most of the hospitals in my area ( which are some of the best in the world Cleveland Clinic ect.) do put a lot of focus on projecting a compassionate demeanor from their staff.:heartbeat

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    IAM46YEARSOLD said that they are not there to take care of a patient on a personal and emotional level.
    Well, that's only half true. One of the duties of a nurse is to project an attitude of compassion, and provide support and comfort to those that are ill and experience a high level of anxiety. Nursing is not just about being efficient and cold.
    Think of how you would want to be treated if you were sick. I am sure you would want to have the feeling that the person caring for you was genuinely concerned about you.

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    I'm not trying to be insensitive to the stressors that you nurses face, but people with substance abuse issues need to be treated with compassion, understanding, and professionalism. It is true that most current medical professionals view substance abuse as a clinical problem, not a criminal or behavioral one, and many people self medicate with drugs to cope with past traumatic issues in their lives.
    I wonder how much compassion some of you have, especially when you label them as "druggies". Perhaps some of you are just in this profession for the money, not because you care about people and want to help them get well.
    Also , when you have a negative attitude towards certain patients, that can have a very real effect on the quality of care that they recieve. It is important to be objective at all times.
    I understand that dealing with fractious patients can be difficult, and it is healthy to be able to express you feelings about your job.
    ilsRN said that they could never be a mental health professional, and some of you seconded that. Well, working in mental health is not such a seperate compartment from mainstream healthcare. Many patients that you will encounter will have some type of mental health issues, and you need to know how to respond to them.
    Statements like that are bordering on having an ignorant attitude about psychiatric patients, which usually leads to them being treated differently than other patients, and frequently the result is that they are medically neglected, or even verbally or physically abused.
    This has actually happened to me before , even to the point of being abused and neglected ( I have neurological problems that were undiagnosed for a long time and were thought to be psychiatric) . In my case, I wasn't even acting "mentally ill", the staff just treated me badly because I came into the ER with a label of mental illness. I actually had to report that hospital to CMS.
    Sorry for the lengthy post, I just wanted to say something about two issues that I feel strongly about.redbeathe

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    I'm not trying to be insensitive to the stressors that you nurses face, but people with substance abuse issues need to be treated with compassion, understanding, and professionalism. It is true that most current medical professionals view substance abuse as a clinical problem, not a criminal or behavioral one, and many people self medicate with drugs to cope with past traumatic issues in their lives.
    I wonder how much compassion some of you have, especially when you label them as "druggies". Perhaps some of you are just in this profession for the money, not because you care about people and want to help them get well.
    Also , when you have a negative attitude towards certain patients, that can have a very real effect on the quality of care that they recieve. It is important to be objective at all times.
    I understand that dealing with fractious patients can be difficult, and it is healthy to be able to express you feelings about your job.
    ilsRN said that they could never be a mental health professional, and some of you seconded that. Well, working in mental health is not such a seperate compartment from mainstream healthcare. Many patients that you will encounter will have some type of mental health issues, and you need to know how to respond to them.
    Statements like that are bordering on having an ignorant attitude about psychiatric patients, which usually leads to them being treated differently than other patients, and frequently the result is that they are medically neglected, or even verbally or physically abused.
    This has actually happened to me before , even to the point of being abused and neglected ( I have neurological problems that were undiagnosed for a long time and were thought to be psychiatric) . In my case, I wasn't even acting "mentally ill", the staff just treated me badly because I came into the ER with a label of mental illness. I actually had to report that hospital to CMS.
    Sorry for the lengthy post, I just wanted to say something about two issues that I feel strongly about.redbeathe



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