Latest Comments by L0velyNurse

L0velyNurse 550 Views

Joined: Dec 6, '07; Posts: 5 (0% Liked)

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    Hello everyone...I just recently changed my schedule at work. I use to work 7am-3pm. It was really rough at first, being a new grad, learning to manage time and trying to get things done on time. But in time I finally got used to eveything, and everything day by day got easier. I was offered to work 11pm-7am and from what I was hearing it would be a much easier shift, so I took it. I had one day training so far and everything seems easier, because the patients were asleep, and their wasn't that many medications to be given. So far the only thing I found difficult was trying to fight off sleep. How long will it take for me to get used to the time change, and how do other night owl nurses stay energized during the night/morning? And besides changing the feedings, accu checks, scheduled meds, stocking/checking medications and equipment what else should be done during this shift? I want to do all I can during my shift. And i've noticed that I had more time to do things. Any advice would be much appreciated.

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    Hello there!

    I just recently received my nclex results in the mail not too long ago. And YES, i'm from California, and YES.....it came in a BIG white envelope.I've heard different stories about if it's small you pass, if it's big you failed. So when I received my letter, after such a long wait, it came in a big white envelope. My first thought was that I failed, I didn't even want to open it. My hands were shaking hold that envelope. But sooner or later I had to anyway, so I did......and with my heart beating so fast, I didn't even read the whole letter, I just looked for the words "PASSED" And I did (Thank God). After you receive your results, it also has other papers that you have to mail back to the state inorder to receive your actual license, so maybe that's why it came in a big envelope.....BUT, I also had some friends that sadly didn't pass, their letter also came in a big white envelope, and they also had papers that needed to be sent out to retake the test. So far the people that i've known to have passed or failed the test here in California got their letters in a big envelope. Hoped this helped you out in a way. :spin:

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    Hello everyone...this would only be my 2nd thread. I previously asked for advice about working in LTC. I lasted working there for atleast 1 month, longer than I thought I would. I just couldn't handle the way other nurses did things. I kept thinking that my license was on the line. Anyway...I have recently got accepted as an lvn doing registry. Can anyone tell me how registry differs from LTC? I know its totally different, but i'm kind of nervous doing registry for the first time. What are some of the duties registry lvn's face? Please i'm in desperate need of advice. Are there anything tips I need to know before I start?!?:tinkbll:

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    Thank you so much Daytonite! I really needed all the advice I can get. Everyone is right I just need to hang in there. Yeah, long term care is really hard for a beginner like myself, but I was thinking it would be the best place where I can learn the most in this career and better myself as a nurse. I will try that ToDoList..thank you for the tip. I like to be organized too. I just need to find my rhythm and pace myself. Once again THANK YOU! =) Hopefully I can keep you updated on how things go from here @ work.

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    Hello everyone! I just recently joined this forum in the hopes of getting some advice on the new career I have been blessed with. I never wanted anything more than to be a nurse. I have been working as an LVN for only 3 weeks now...and so far...everything seems too overwhelming for me. It's making me double think, what I got myself into. It's really different from the clinical experience I had during school compared to the real thing when your by yourself working for the first time. In school the most patients you take care of was 4...now I have 20 + patients. I know it's only normal to be really slow passing out the medications at first, but how long does it take until it gets easier?!? Some nurses are very kind in helping out a new nurse, but I guess it's true what they say...."old eat their young". There are so much things to do..and learn...it feels like my head is running around everywhere. I feel grateful for those who help me, but also guilty in the fact that their doing the job I should be doing. I really want to quit, because I feel like I didn't get enough training. It just gives me an uneasy feeling on how other nurses care for the other patients. Yes, they do finish fast, because of "short cuts", but I don't want to be like that. I want to have enough time to spend with my patients to throughly assess their needs. Sadly to say their just isn't enough time, with medication pass, and family calling, doctors new orders, and many other things the needs to be done. Should I just quit in saving my license or am I just over reacting?!? Will things get easier when I get used to everything. I'm thinking I just need more time to get use to things, but honestly i've been moved to every station and worked all 3 shifts, its insane. Keep in mind also that this would be my first experince and first job as a nurse. I'm so confused!!! Please help with any advice you can offer...I also needed to vent!:uhoh21: Thank you!



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