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brandy1017 34,647 Views

Joined: Jun 30, '02; Posts: 2,179 (68% Liked) ; Likes: 4,921

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  • Jun 17

    Quote from RNperdiem
    I am fighting a temporary bout of absolute exhaustion too. I first read your post waiting for my son's neurosurgeon to tell me how the operation went. Big stress = big exhaustion. I force myself to eat regular nutritious meals, get outside every day, try to sleep well, and make good use of people who want to help.
    RNperdiem,

    I hope your son is doing well and recovering with flying colors. Sending best wishes!

  • Jun 15

    First and foremost, don't feel bad about feeling bad. I've been a nurse for 4 years and I remember feeling exactly the same for about 1.5 to 2 years after graduating. I'm not going to lie, it is very difficult to be present physically, mentally and emotionally at work while going through this. It does not mean you're in the wrong field or that you're not good. If you feel unsure, then review material, don't just worry because worrying won't get anything done. Secondly, you MUST vent to someone. The more you hold on to this the harder it will be. This feeling will go away and things will get easier to bear, not because they're easy but because you will feel confident enough to handle things. So, I recommend reviewing material and going over things to ease your anxiety. Also, do something on your days off that you enjoy, like writing and painting (I like doing that). What I used to do was print positive statements and put them on my night stand, that way I can see positive statements before closing my eyes at bedtime and also be the first thing I see when I open them. I was never one to pray, but I learned to once I got into this profession, I prayed before every shift and also before bed. It takes a lot for some of us to be able to be okay; we have to find different methods to calm that anxiety and switch the negativity to positivity, but do it anyway. What ever it takes, do it. Because I can assure you, this profession is worth all of the difficulties and stresses that come along. You will see it in your patient's faces and all the people that you touch. Don't give up.

  • Jun 15

    I think the problem is that the job market has changed and employers have not adjusted to that change yet.

    Nurses are in very high demand where I live. Nurses can pick where they want to work. But employers are still operating as though every job offer is a gift from God, and anyone who gets one should take it.

    Prospective employees should be given an opportunity to shadow, time to make a decision and an opportunity to review the details of the employee contract before an offer is accepted. None of the job offers I have gotten since I graduated have provided all of these.

    Employees are left to take jobs blindly. It's not surprising that they are often left in positions that are not a good fit.

  • Jun 15

    Quote from klone
    Employment at will. The employer or the employee can terminate employment at any time, for any reason, or no reason at all.

    I truly believe that a person's loyalty/responsibility should be to themselves and their families FIRST. I also really don't want an employee who is not fully engaged in their job. I would rather they leave and make room for someone who is.
    ^^ This.

    Most of today's organizations in the US have absolutely no loyalty or care for their employees. Pensions are stripped, health care cost for employees are up, and they find every way possible to boost their bottom lines including cutting into employee benefits. We should always put ourselves first.

    If employees are not staying, perhaps you should ask "what can I do better to retain talents" rather than blaming people who want to look out for themselves.

  • Jun 15

    In my experience any new job is an "uncomfortable fit" for at least the 1st 3 months until you are accepted,
    establish relationships, get to know the culture, learn where things are, phone numbers, who is cool and who
    to avoid etc. If you bail too early then you never get past the uncomfortable newby feeling.

    That said, if it is a truly sucky job and you know for sure it is not going to work, then it is smart to bail.
    However, it is always easier to get a new job while you still have a job so keep that in mind and try not to
    burn bridges. I have lied about my reasons for leaving in the past to always keep the door open and the
    references positive.

  • Jun 15

    Quote from Emergent
    I'm of the opinion that, we should do our due diligence before we accept a job. We need to find out specifics such as ratios, hours, etc. Then we make the commitment to work there. Unless you've been lied to, I think you should stay for more than 6 weeks.

    It's a common theme here, often a new grad who settles for the job they can get, who then wants to jump ship right away! I've seen different versions of this many times. I've heard various rationale, I hate nightshift , I'm not challenged on med-surg, I have too many patients in LTC, my coworkers are rude bullies, etc.

    There are some extreme situations of course, but generally speaking I think it's unprofessional to bail out of a job so soon.
    while i agree with the overall statement, where you lose me is where you mention

    "I hate nightshift , I'm not challenged on med-surg, I have too many patients in LTC, my coworkers are rude bullies, etc." as i find all of these pretty valid reasons to want to leave a job.

    i hate nightshift -- while nightshift mayve initially seemed like a good idea at the time, if its not working out for you, why damage your health and overall wellbeing and peace of mind for what i would consider no good reason either

    im not challenged on m/s-- if youre working in an environment that you dont feel challenged or an overall will or drive to do well, your performance slips, plain and simple. showing up to work becomes a drag and almost soul-crushing when you have no interest in what you're doing. again, why subject yourself to that?

    i have too many pts on LTC-- if you cant handle your workload, you become unsafe, and pts suffer. 'nuff said

    my coworkers are rude bullies-- we spend 12 hrs a day (ideally) with these people. if you factor in the fact that youre probably asleep for 8 hrs a day, you have 4 hrs of alone time you probably use to decompress after a shift. if you're anything like me, working a stretch of 3 or 4, you're only ever asleep, eating, driving to work and actually at work. so to have to spend so much of your awake/conscious time around pts that run you ragged, and then to be kicked around by your coworkers as well again makes very little sense to me.

    no job is perfect, and we all value and dislike many aspects of where we work and what we do. but theres only so much we should be expected to sacrifice in ourselves.

  • Jun 15

    I used to think like that, too. I drove an hour and a half one way to my first nursing job for 15 months before I finally had to change to a hospital closer to home. I was literally falling asleep driving home on the busiest highway in my state. Now I've been at my current job for 3 years. I come in extra all the time to prevent mandatory overtime. I switch shifts to cover holes. I float out of turn. I come in extra on other units if mine is staffed well to prevent other units from having mandatory overtime. I'm a precepting MACHINE, I pump out nurses like clockwork. I'm charge all the damn time.

    My hospital could not care less. A resident accused me of patient negligence a few months ago. Long story short she was covering her own butt because she had actually put orders in way wrong. Admin did not hesitate to jump down my throat and point fingers at me. Even the union wasn't helpful. What saved me was my own detailed charting, and a fully oriented patient who about had a stroke when they told her what I was being accused of.

    I don't owe them anything. I give them my time and in turn they give me a paycheck. Life is short; there's no reason to stay at a job you don't want, even if there isn't anything wrong with that job.

  • Jun 15

    I think the majority of new grads do stick with their jobs. However those who are uncertain if the should switch are far more likely to post here than those who stay put. Life is too short to be in a workplace you are truely unhappy or feel unsafe. My cadveat would be to have another position lines up before switching

  • Jun 15

    I think it's funny your title says "for no good reason" and then you go on to list a few good reasons that they quit. Bullying, high patient ratios, not challenging, not wanting to work night shift. The main one being THEY SETTLED for that job. If at any time during their short employment someone had made them feel useful, wanted, respected, or any other positive word you want to throw in, they might stay. If someone settles for a job, but it turns out to be a decent place they'll usually stay. If some place treats you like another bag of raw nurse meat then I say get whatever better comes along.

  • Jun 15

    I've been lucky, in that I've worked in good conditions.

    But I've seen some situations that haven't worked out for former classmates, or former coworkers, and even posters here on AN, and I'm not about to judge someone who's clearly miserable (for whatever reason).

    Whether it's night shift (and boy am I lucky, I've never had to do it), or distance, or the job wasn't what one envisioned ... I'd rather work with someone who is satisfied with their work environment. Or, their work/life balance.

    And, like Sour Lemon said, employers don't hesitate to drop an employee that doesn't meet their needs so ...

  • Jun 15

    Employment at will. The employer or the employee can terminate employment at any time, for any reason, or no reason at all.

    I truly believe that a person's loyalty/responsibility should be to themselves and their families FIRST. I also really don't want an employee who is not fully engaged in their job. I would rather they leave and make room for someone who is.

  • Jun 15

    Quote from Emergent
    I'm of the opinion that, we should do our due diligence before we accept a job. We need to find out specifics such as ratios, hours, etc. Then we make the commitment to work there. Unless you've been lied to, I think you should stay for more than 6 weeks.

    It's a common theme here, often a new grad who settles for the job they can get, who then wants to jump ship right away! I've seen different versions of this many times. I've heard various rationale, I hate nightshift , I'm not challenged on med-surg, I have too many patients in LTC, my coworkers are rude bullies, etc.

    There are some extreme situations of course, but generally speaking I think it's unprofessional to bail out of a job so soon.
    I disagree. Employers don't hesitate to drop employees who no longer meet their needs ...and they don't hire people because they "care" about them on a personal or professional level. Employees shouldn't feel obligated to offer anything that employers don't offer. Nothing in exchange for nothing seems pretty fair to me.

  • Jun 15

    Agree with that. I just don't understand how you can be a master of something with zero experience. My favorite is the CNL that alot of these programs give just absurd to make someone with zero experience a leader...

  • Jun 15

    Quote from Mavrick
    Why, why, WHY, do people even consider this kind of rip-off "education".

    Ignorance? Greed? Impatience?

    Now where is that thread of the the new grad who was super stressed and posted that it was waaaay too late for her to NOT choose a crushing debt load because when she made the decision she just didn't know how life changing that debt would be.
    It's also the crowd who wants to go directly to being an NP. This is especially seen with Columbia's MDE program which makes applicants choose what kind of NP they want to be before a single day of Nursing School. I just don't get it at all get an education and work before going onto an advanced degree. These MDE programs should be shut down as they are a complete disservice to the student.

  • Jun 15

    My husband left medical school over 200,000 it debt. The only reason this six figure debt is doable is because he is a trauma surgeon. We have almost paid it off. The earning potenital of a new grad NP is not even close. You will have this debt for a long, long time. Imagine how those monthly payments will hinder the other goals in your life. Is it worth it to "save" a year or two?


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