Latest Comments by jimminy

jimminy 1,744 Views

Joined: Sep 5, '01; Posts: 44 (5% Liked) ; Likes: 2

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    OBHEATHERNurse

    "You guys in ER & L&D are the only one's (I think) that have pt's that walk in off the street. You guys don't really have anywhere to steer your frustration of another new patient. But unfortunately, you get the brunt of it. "

    Thank you - not nurses think of this and it is really nice to hear our frustrations verbalized by someone else upstairs - thanks

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    jmcclellanprofrn, Texas does allow concealed guns, but only with training and passing a test. Trust me, the criminals don't take this test and they are in every city, town, and suburb.. The metal detecters are necessary to keep out the criminal packing visitors, not just the legal ones that are trying to protect themselves from the other. I agree with you about not allowing the two irate sons back at all. Our security would have also hauled them out. The metal detectors are only for walk in people. I wish we had them for the ambulance stretchers to pass thru. We have pulled guns out of pockets in the shock rooms.

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    Ours is called SAMA (Satori Alternatives to Manage Aggression). Satori stands for "clear understanding". It is a four day program that has been condensed into one 8 hour session. It involves all aspects of aggression, including recognizing, de-escalating, and defensive techniques. It was developed by Larry Hampton and it copyrighted by Satori Learning Designs, Inc. I quess you could find out about them on the net, but I'm not sure. We had employees from our district go to a conference on it, then they taught us. Hope it helps

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    Penelope_Pitstop likes this.

    propane torch in rectum!! No, it wasn't lit, but he did go to or.

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    Sounds good. The reason we don't always stand up and be counted is because we are too **** tired after shifts from hell. Our poor bodys would have to be held up by sticks and someone would have to open and shut our mouths for us to talk.:chuckle

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    We had one in our area (retired now). He was the most gentle, compassionate, loving doctor I have ever met. There was none of the "God complex" at all. No matter who you talked to, they knew this doctor, and would always smile when his name was mentioned. My family was soooo sad when he retired. Yes, he had a private practice, but provided free care to many that noone ever knew about except a few. Sniff. However, he did not have a clown nose! (if a child wanted him to wear one, I know he would have in a heart beat)

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    lol! I admire anyone that works the floors. Some of the hardest patients inthe EC to take care of are the admitted holds (no beds). They are the most demanding and "helpless". Then the families decide they know better how to take care of their families, aaaagggghhhh!. It's funny though, the reeealllly sick ones say thank you, and "it you have time," it is a whole lot easier to be a theraputic. Most of the walkie-talkies are the really demanding and they can take care of themselves.

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    I think all nurses should rotate to all the different areas during orientation and again once a year. This way we would see alll sides of the coin and know that every specialty has it's problems, concerns, and frustrations. I know from experience that yes, we may find out a patient is going to be admitted, but that patient may not go up for another 8 hours. However, if we would all rotate, everyone would know that the admit docs decide to hold the admit orders until another ct is run, neuro consults are done, more labs, c-spine is cleared, and then more xrays are done (because, according to the docs, it takes too long upstairs). This is after all the initial workup has been done. We end up stabilizing the patient, doing all the initial workup and then the admit docs orders that he wants done in the EC first! This is not just Trauma, it occurs with all the types of patients. I have seen the docs finally pull the orders out of their pockets that are dated 6 hours ago, so it looks like we were lazy and "sat" on the patient for six hours. I write on the orders "received orders at ___ time". We have started to take a patient up and the doctor changes his mind and wants ANOTHER test!!

    Yes it is frustrating for everyone. Trust EC nurses when they say they are not sitting on patients on purpose. We don't want them any longer than necessary because we've got 4 nurses, fifty acute patients, and more EMS rolling in constantly, and this does not include getting pulled to the different areas when the trauma rooms get swamped. This is the holding area! If we went upstairs and worked with ya'll, we would see your frustrations.

    Why can't everyone just get along? :kiss

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    out

    baked or fried?

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    nurseatlarge - snowwhite, west,

    furball - QUIET

    day or night

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    depends....old dogs, young children, i'm young to me, old to my kids.

    round or square?

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    no, you do not sound crazy! We were so bad the other night. The house supervisor came down and said the same thing about the floor being just as crazy. She said they did not have enough staff upstairs. I'm afraid I lost it a little. All trauma rooms were full, trauma in the halls and tele had just let us know we were have multiple GSWs coming in!! I screamed at her to find me some beds now, and "send me some help by God or get out your stethoscope and grab a patient in this hall, because until you have them overflowing in your halls upstairs, then you're not as busy as us!!!!" She looked stunned, turned and left. She sent me one nurse and one nursing assistant, who of course did not know a thing about emergency medicine! I'm surprised I still have my job

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    CEN35

    Oops, I forgot to mention that we heard the unofficial scuttlebutt after one of the "administrators" spent three hours with us....................they are going to leave the EC alone for now!!ROTGLOL! Of course they haven't offered to approve MORE staff, but we can go a long way on that one day (satisfaction way)

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    CEN35

    Wouldn't they just die, probably after just three hours also!!! We have all (all er nurses) gotten used to working so short staffed at such a high acuity level, that even if they staffed us a little better it would be short staffed according to standards and we would think it was better!! Does that make any sense at all?? I'm also so tired of hearing about that "damned EC" I could scream. Upstairs they refuse to work greater that 1:7 on regular floors! I'd give my first born and my right arm to have1:15 of higher acuity!

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    michelle,
    At our hospital, the one that finds the problem fills out the incident report, informs the head nurse and the doctor. The doctor has to fill out a portion that states what he did, then the head nurse fills out an investigation report and sends it to qa. If the head nurse is able to determine who made the error, she fills out a medication error the same day. If not, QA sends a form for the director to investigate by getting the chart and reviewing it. Always call the MD on any error and chart it, facts only. He/she may have wanted an acetaminophen level in for hours, and again four hours later and/or given her a dose of mucomyst since it was an elderly lady. Of course, it may have not been needed at all, but the md needs to make that decision, not the head nurse. Always CYA, don't assume that the other nurse or department will do the right thing. It is NOT tatteling (sp), tell them it is hospital policy and best for the patient. Who knows, this nurse may have made many med errors in the past and needs counseling.
    You did good, dont let other nurses intimidate you.


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