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dogmombyday, RN 1,393 Views

Joined: Aug 26, '17; Posts: 28 (54% Liked) ; Likes: 75

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  • Dec 5 '17

    Sounds like part of the blame lies on the nurse that acknowledged the order and didn't pass the info along. At any rate, no need to beat yourself up. Use this experience to do better.

  • Dec 5 '17

    Quote from dogmombyday
    (This is basically just to vent, but I digress) I had my first ****show of a night last night and thought that I handled it very well. I mean like to the point that I didn't sit for the first half of my shift and felt like I literally just ran in place for six hours. I was all yay me! Until...I realized that I missed an order. I checked my orders at the start of the shift for this patient and didn't see anything new going on, so I went about my shift. Well, he had tube feed running and was supposed to be NPO after midnight...which I did not do. His procedure is hopefully happening today, possibly evening at last update, but the family can't be reached for consent. So while it's hardly a set in stone kinda deal, I'm feeling really frustrated with myself for missing that. I hate making mistakes, and I'm kicking myself for missing that.
    I've learned to force myself to make time to check orders, read results, etc. Most tasks can be put off. It's more important to know what's going on. Even still, something manages to get by me occasionally. Tomorrow is a new day.

  • Nov 7 '17

    Quote from Wandrlust
    I only had 2 weeks of training as a new grad. I think new grads are spoiled nowadays with such legnthy orientations and want their hand held and caudling the entire time. I know I sound mean, but I repeatedly see new grads like you, where your not prepared by the end of orientation, need to extend orientation etc. etc. Nursing is hard, especially acute care, some people just don't cut it. Some new grads don't ever catch on and are so slow about eveything, not just slow with tasks, but slow comprehending and prioririzing and want to take the long methodical way to do everything-ot look like a deer in the head lights when you explain the simplest things. That's great if you have 1 patient, but it will never work on a busy unit. You're not a nursing student anymore!!

    And I don't believe you had 5 patients on your first day! Maybe the nurse had you take report on them and you helped, but no way she had you do all the assessments, med administration and care under her license without at least seeing you do an assessment first.
    Your comment is absolutely ridiculous and mean spirited. To say something like this to someone who is clearly distressed after being set up for failure from the get go and then being told she will always fail as a nurse speaks volumes of you.

    The average new grad is not equipped to practice as a new nurse right after graduating from nursing school. For this reason, hospitals utilize nurse residencies. Said residencies usually last 3-ish months. TWO weeks is not enough for a brand new nurse to practice independently or more important, SAFELY. I highly doubt YOU were the super nurse you think you were after two weeks of orientation.

    To the OP,
    Please disregard comments like this. This job did not work out. That does not mean you cannot be a successful nurse. You just need to be in the right environment to flourish. Keep applying for jobs and be honest. It's okay to say it wasn't a good fit but don't bad mouth your prior employer, your manager or your preceptor. Focus on what you can do to improve and highlight your accomplishments and what you've learned from the situation. Best of luck to you!!!!

  • Nov 7 '17

    Quote from Wandrlust
    I only had 2 weeks of training as a new grad. I think new grads are spoiled nowadays with such legnthy orientations and want their hand held and caudling the entire time. I know I sound mean, but I repeatedly see new grads like you, where your not prepared by the end of orientation, need to extend orientation etc. etc. Nursing is hard, especially acute care, some people just don't cut it. Some new grads don't ever catch on and are so slow about eveything, not just slow with tasks, but slow comprehending and prioririzing and want to take the long methodical way to do everything-ot look like a deer in the head lights when you explain the simplest things. That's great if you have 1 patient, but it will never work on a busy unit. You're not a nursing student anymore!!

    And I don't believe you had 5 patients on your first day! Maybe the nurse had you take report on them and you helped, but no way she had you do all the assessments, med administration and care under her license without at least seeing you do an assessment first.
    Did you also walk barefoot in the snow, uphill both ways to school each day? Congrats, you were putting your patients at risk with only two weeks of orientation! No new nurse is ready to be on their own after two weeks! It's dangerous in my opinion. No new grad is ready to take their own assignment after two weeks. I don’t care how awesome you think you were back in the day, this kind of attitude is dangerous.

  • Nov 7 '17

    Quote from Wandrlust
    I only had 2 weeks of training as a new grad. I think new grads are spoiled nowadays with such legnthy orientations and want their hand held and caudling the entire time. I know I sound mean, but I repeatedly see new grads like you, where your not prepared by the end of orientation, need to extend orientation etc. etc. Nursing is hard, especially acute care, some people just don't cut it. Some new grads don't ever catch on and are so slow about eveything, not just slow with tasks, but slow comprehending and prioririzing and want to take the long methodical way to do everything-ot look like a deer in the head lights when you explain the simplest things. That's great if you have 1 patient, but it will never work on a busy unit. You're not a nursing student anymore!!

    And I don't believe you had 5 patients on your first day! Maybe the nurse had you take report on them and you helped, but no way she had you do all the assessments, med administration and care under her license without at least seeing you do an assessment first.
    My preceptor loved to say, "it's the newbies who think they know it all that are the scariest, not the ones asking questions."

    So for someone who thinks they're the safest, bestest nurse at two weeks orientation ... I'll go with the "spoilt" newbie who requires the 10-12 weeks.

  • Nov 7 '17

    Quote from brownbook
    I wanted to be so sarcastic in my reply.....but I restrained myself.

    I hate math and statistics, but I am pretty certain thousands more people die in car accidents each year than from nurses, and I'll even include doctors, making fatal mistakes.

    I doubt if you or your friend go around saying you are going to make a fatal mistake and kill yourselves, your loved ones, or an innocent stranger, in an automobile accident once a year.

    That is much more likely to happen but we all seem to accept it.

    Please repeat after me. "It is very very VERY difficult to kill a patient from a wrong IV, or pill, or "mistake".

    OK I'll have to be a little snarky, if you are so gullible to believe a preposterous statement your friend makes, I don't think you should go into nursing!
    Maybe you should have restrained yourself a little better. That last sentence was unnecessary and unreasonable.

  • Nov 7 '17

    Geez, Brownbook and wondern - dial it down a notch!

  • Oct 6 '17

    I have been out of acute care beside nursing since 2000. Worked in ambulatory care surgical center, one connected to an acute care hospital. The other an independent ambulatory clinic. Didn't see anything like this in ambulatory care? So far all responders have agreed with the original posters point of view.

    If bedside nursing is really this bad why aren't nurses shouting it loudly here on Allnurses or elsewhere that bedside nursing is a fake, a sham, a joke. Telling all family and loved ones to please, please, never go to a hospital?

    I pray it is just a little over board. If it is 100% accurate I agree with your assessments,....I will never allow myself or a loved one to be admitted to a hospital!

  • Sep 30 '17

    Quote from PrettyNerd
    Hey allnurses!
    So today I was upset by a comment/question one of my coworkers made.
    I am currently working as a CNA but I graduated from an LPN program and passed the NCLEX (currently looking for an LPN job). I don't want to let people know that I passed the boards or that I'm looking for a job, so as far as they know, I've only graduated from the program.

    Anyway, today one of my coworkers asked me if I was a nurse, I said "no, not yet" she then asked "but you went to school to be a nurse right?" I said "yes I did" she then asked "so are you going to be a real nurse, or just an LPN?" I was VERY bothered by this question and I absolutely DESPISE when people don't see LPNs as nurses.

    LPN, for people who are ignorant, stands for Licensed vocational NURSE! LPNs need to take and pass the NCLEX (the board examination that "real nurses" take) to be able to work as a NURSE. We need to apply and get accepted into a program which is NOT very easy. We study human anatomy, physiology, microbiology, AND pass those courses with A's or B's to get into a program. We spend clinical hours in various settings not only shadowing nurses but also getting hands on experience as the role of a NURSE. We've been in clinics, hospitals, long term care facilities, sub acute, psych units. I've passed meds (PO, SQ, IM), I've seen a live birth (assisted as much as I was allowed), Did trach care, reported with other nurses/doctors... I mean, I'm not going to go on and explain what I did as an LPN/LVN student. Point is, I went to school to study to be a NURSE, period. I passed the NURSING board to practice as a NURSE in my state. I really hate to be label as "just an LVN", "LVN" or "Not a real nurse". I'm a NURSE, darn it! And just because I did LPN/LVN doesn't mean it was easy, it was a very complicated, long, difficult journey!!

    So, Why do people think that LVN's are not nurses? Is there a reason I don't know about as to why LVN/LPNs are not respected as "real nurses"?
    Just wanted to know reasons why we ARE nurses. Maybe there's something I don't know.
    Also, just to have reasons to tell other people why we ARE nurses. The only thing I was able to tell my coworker was that we do everything "real nurses" do except IVs (even then some states can do IV's).

    Thanks guys, just a little annoyed, can't formulate words that well lol
    Just to clarify, LPN's don't actually take the same NCLEX that RNs take, they take the NCLEX-PN.

    LPN's are certainly nurses and play an important role in caring for patients, although they aren't really equivocal to Registered Nurses where a 2 year core nursing program is done, which is significantly different than a 1 year LPN program.

  • Sep 18 '17

    Posters, She is new to the profession. She is asking a question based on her observations. The question shows she is worried and probably scared. She is probably asking herself has she wasted all that money taking prerequisites and nursing school tuition.

    She needs reassurance that all nurses are not "mean girls" or guys. Reassure her that she may not understand what she is seeing and the next time she has clinical, she may see a different scene. Please DON"T jump on her and tell her to suck it up or get out of the career. She is new to the profession.

    If she were a 1yo who could talk and was beginning to walk, she might ask, "Why is the ground outside so bumpy?" That would not be disrespectful and the attitude and answers of those who are answering her would not be like some of these answers to this student.

    She is new and scared. Nursing school is hard. Instructors can be scary to students because the students' whole future careers and incomes depend on those instructors' opinions. Be kind to her. She is new. She will learn and become accustomed to the various hospital scenarios and units. Please don't be so hard on her at this stage of her development. We are the experienced nurses and know how to calm those who are scared, generalizing a few happenings to a whole set of people, and making untrue assumptions. So let's do it.

    To the OP: Not all nurses are hateful to each other. You will be fine because you seem sensitive to those around you and their attitudes. Use this sensitivity to learn ways to positively react to people. The why they are that way at this time (perhaps this is a terrible time) is not as important as you learning how to react to the negative activity and/or words.

    Talk with one of your instructors who is a calming, nurturing person and get some tips from him/her on how to react during such behaviors. You will be fine and as someone already said, notice what you don't like and try not to be like that throughout your nursing school experience and career. I wish you the best, sweet new nursing school student.

  • Sep 18 '17

    Seriously, ever heard of eating your young? Give the poor kid a break about the user name. Are we really SO insecure that a student that is working towards being a nurse is such a threat? They are very concerned about the way that patients treat nurses. This is a very valid concern and one we should address and help them to find their way toward resolving. Making the user name the issue is a coup out. Avoiding an issue that all "nurses"- experienced, newbie or student need to unite to address. This is part of the problem. We let levels of experience and ego get in the way of a united front that makes us all stronger. Support this individual and offer up your own experience, don't be threatened by someone that is seeing things with fresh eyes.

  • Sep 18 '17

    Quote from pixierose
    Thank you for the articles.

    I did a look at several of them. While I do agree that bullying can, and does, take place in nursing, I don't agree with the OP or her intent -- it happens everywhere, sadly. Nursing isn't unique in this regard; it happens in teaching and education, engineering, sales, etc.

    Where you have people, you'll have bullying.

    I have to say, I see more "bullying" behavior with the OP and others in regard to the "lol's!" etc. OP asked a question; she received responses that she disliked (although most where not, in fact, rude or dismissive themselves; more matter of fact), then is dismissive with "lol!" and an emphasized (continued) negative opinion of nursing. Apparently, anyone who disagrees is a bully, which brings me to my former conclusion: OP will find a "bully" anywhere.
    I think you may be confusing a defensive position, with bullying.

    The OP stated HER impression. She was nearly immediately met with negative comments, many of which I felt were personal attacks.

    Most people, when attacked on a personal level, not just in a generalized way, will respond defensively. I feel that is how the OP responded, and I don't blame her.

    The comments accusing OP of "disrespecting" all nurses is laughable. Anyone can read what she wrote and see she is talking about her personal experience at this one facility. Talk about "thin skin."

    As I have stated before, I never felt disrespected by her comment. Never.

    On the other hand, I have felt the callous and nasty comments made regarding her future as a nurse and calling her a "snowflake" are indeed bullying.

    On this Web Site, when fellow new nurses, or students seek out advice, I try my best to be supportive. But many on this site do the opposite. Sorry, but it is true.

    I have NEVER referred to a poster as a "snowflake" and I never will. It isn't useful or helpful. But of course, that isn't the intent of such comments, is it?

    Being a nursing student or new nurse is a precarious position to be in. As a student, you are looking for potential employers and perhaps mentors. As a new nurse, you are trying to find how you fit into the unit culture. It just isn't easy.

    Let's try to be helpful.

  • Sep 8 '17

    This is my situation: I was recently certified as a CNA in the state of California. I was offered a position at a facility this Tuesday and went in to a clinic for a pre-employment physical and drug test. I was supposed to start orientation today, but the clinic had not sent my results to the facility yet. The DSD made it seem like I should have had my paperwork sent over by now and this delay is unusual. I called the clinic today to ask and they told me that the doctor there had called me earlier to discuss my results. He is unavailable until tomorrow, but no one else can tell me about the status at the clinic.

    I'm fearing the worst. To provide some background, I used to smoke marijuana in college. After graduating I made the decision to quit so I could get my life together. I planned to pursue the medical field and to that end I spent this last year taking additional classes for grad school pre-reqs, volunteered at a hospital for a number of months, completed a CNA cert, and took the GRE. I ceased all smoking of marijuana for 7 months during this time and was very determined to reach my goals and put that all behind me.

    This summer, from July to about August, I had some time to myself and nothing to do. No classes, work, etc. It was my first "vacation" in a while considering I had been in school/working/volunteering etc. during all of my breaks since graduating. I made the poor decision to smoke again with some of my friends who were home on break as well. I accept responsibility for the mistake and whatever consequences are going to come from it.

    At the time, it didn't seem like a big deal. I knew I wouldn't be working or anything that required a drug test for a bit, so I figured I'd have it under control. I quit smoking around August 6th and waited a month before seeking employment and taking this drug test. I even took a home test to see if I passed and I did. I had/have NO intentions whatsoever of ever smoking while working in the healthcare field. I recognize the risks to myself and my patients and take this line of work seriously.

    But at this point, the damage seems to have been done and I'm terrified. I'm afraid that everything I've worked so hard for could be lost. Does anyone know what will happen to me? Will the facility receive the report of my failed drug test and pass that information on to the California dept of public health? Even though I haven't been hired there, will they be obligated to report me? Will I lose my CNA cert? Can I just seek employment as a CNA at a different facility? I'm confident that if I tested again within a week or so, I would pass a drug test (seriously how could I fail after 40+ days of complete sobriety?). Will this failed drug test be grounds for potential PA schools or the like to decline me as an applicant?

    Any and all advice is appreciated. I'm very scared of what's to come tomorrow and I don't know what to say when I speak to the Dr. about my test.

  • Sep 3 '17

    Try to set some learning goals for each new shift.

    Keep a log of "pearls" that you pick up.

    Study, study, study.

    While you're at home and relaxed, visualize a chaotic code... and picture yourself calmly making a contribution.

    During the real thing, look for what's not being done... clearing space, getting another line, raising/lowering the bed, getting a stool for compressors, getting a board, spiking a bag of NS on a pressure bag, engaging the family, getting suction hooked up, bagging, putting in an OPA, getting flushes, setting up ETCO2

    Pick your moments and pick your people but learn to chat up the docs... most young docs love to teach enthusiastic learners.

    And remember, always go back to ABCDE and DOPE

    And above all, never forget: Treat the patient, NOT the MONITOR... a patient can have decent vitals but look crappy as heck and be ready to crump... alternatively, the monitors may be screaming at you but the patient is still mentating and ventilating and perfusing.

  • Aug 29 '17

    Remember a few things. You are there to do your best to help the patient...but, don't blame yourself, sometimes people die.
    Sometimes families can be a pain in the butt but, think of what they are feeling and going through with their loved one in an ICU. They are not at their best during this stressful time.
    Offer help to others and they will offer help to you. Even though you have your patients, it doesn't mean a group of you can't function a bit like a team. Tag teaming helps with bathing and turning for example SAVE YOUR BACK NOW so you are not a cripple later.
    If you have time, make rounds with the doctors, including looking at X-rays. You can learn so much, even when it's not your patient. I love to listen in when doctors were teaching residents and fellows.


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