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Masters Degree to RN? San Antonio

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gccolvin gccolvin (New) New

HI,

I am helping my wife find information on the best course of action for someone who holds a masters degree to enter the nursing field. This is something my wife has long wanted to do, however has always been reluctant due to financial constraints. She has a masters degree in Marketing, and we are trying to find out what would be the best route to take to enter the nursing field, I.E. fast track BSN, RN, ADN? In short she doesnt want to leave a 120k a year job to go to a 30k a year job, but the aspect of being in school 3 plus years for fsat track BSN is a little daunting as well, so any suggestions, advice, etc. will be greatly appreciated, thanks so much for your time, and I hope to hear from you soon. Also we do have a family and reside in the san antonio area so we will be trying to locate a program either here or very near here to avoid relocation! Again, thanks in advance for any info. you may be able to offer!

I would suggest accelerated BSN, traditional BSN, or entry level MSN to make best use of the college credits she already has. Without prior healthcare experience she will have to prepare to work very hard to keep up with the intensity of the course load, especially the sciences. She might want to consider the traditional BSN if she has any doubts about tackling science and nursing courses headon.

HouTx, BSN, MSN, EdD

Specializes in Critical Care, Education. Has 35 years experience.

Is she CRAZY???? Leaving a $120k per year job in this economy? Her RN salary will be less than half that. I know that no one goes into nursing for the money, but this kind of change just boggles my mind.

That being said - I am assuming her degree is an MA? It doesn't really have much overlap with educational requirements for nursing or other BS degrees so she'll probably have to start all over academic-wise, except for core subjects (eng, history, etc) Some courses expire after a period of time, so you'll need to check with the schools you are looking at. San Antonio has a wealth of nursing programs (ADN, BSN & even 1 diploma pgm), but acceptance is very competitive. Very high pre-req GPAs are the norm.

As for trying to "hurry up" - I know it's tempting, but take some time to see what students on this site are saying about the intensity of nursing education. There are some definite downsides to accelerated programs also especially for people without a healthcare background. One of the biggest would seem to be the fact that you cannot expect to work while enrolled in an accelerated pgm.

You seem like a great spouse! :yeah: Please keep on supporting her as she moves on into 'crazy land' (nursing education). She's going to need you more than ever.

lol, thanks all for the input, I know it sounds crazy but the truth is, I have a job thats basically recession proof, well Amercian recession anyway, and her job is costing her more than the monetary compensation could possibly offset if you get my drift, you know corporate rat race, etc., and as far GPA, sciences etc. its not a problem for her, she is an ace at school, and thanks for the great spouse kudos, however, I am not thaaat great cause her masters is actually in biz managment, not marketing, minor is marketing or something, excuse me, I am just a oilfield hammer swinger, lol! AAAAAnyway, her thinking is that she can spend some time in the field and eventually move into admin. type roles with her background? opinions appreciated, and thanks again!

oh yeah, and crazy land, hahaha, we are in insane world so the transition shouldnt be too bad....but in all honesty I have a friend who is a nurse and I remember when she was in school, was just a touch stressful!

lol, thanks all for the input, I know it sounds crazy but the truth is, I have a job thats basically recession proof, well Amercian recession anyway, and her job is costing her more than the monetary compensation could possibly offset if you get my drift, you know corporate rat race, etc., and as far GPA, sciences etc. its not a problem for her, she is an ace at school, and thanks for the great spouse kudos, however, I am not thaaat great cause her masters is actually in biz managment, not marketing, minor is marketing or something, excuse me, I am just a oilfield hammer swinger, lol! AAAAAnyway, her thinking is that she can spend some time in the field and eventually move into admin. type roles with her background? opinions appreciated, and thanks again!

I hope she realizes that nursing is not heaven. She could very well be trading business rat race for a different kind of rat race. She should go into the business end of it with her background. But then, she will be in the healthcare administration rat race. Rats everywhere if you want to get a juicy treat to eat.

I'd say you should go for it. I have an MBA in Healthcare Administration and am just finishing up the required courses for entry into an ADN program. I was in the same category with my previous salary but have decided to do what I want to do for a change even though the same money is not there. I'm going for the shortest route to RN because having another degree isn't important to me although it may be to you.

You'll have to start over and take all of the basic sciences and get an A in every one of them to get in. I got no preference from the schools for having a Masters Degree. I start my program this fall.

Good luck in your decision!

Kudos to your wife and you. But as an older non-science background graduate of Nursing School myself, who graduated with honors, I can tell you from experience Nursing School is not to be compared with other academics.....it is grueling and beyond at times. Just hope you are both counting the cost beyond financial; Then after graduation it isn't a picnic either and believe me politics definitely exist in hospitals too! I love nursing and don't regret my sacrifices but I hear & see far too many people who don't realize it will take more than grades to stick with the profession, you need to be "called" or you will burnout fast! Not to be discouraging we need more nurses! Just go in with your eyes open.

Is she CRAZY???? Leaving a $120k per year job in this economy? Her RN salary will be less than half that. I know that no one goes into nursing for the money, but this kind of change just boggles my mind.

That being said - I am assuming her degree is an MA? It doesn't really have much overlap with educational requirements for nursing or other BS degrees so she'll probably have to start all over academic-wise, except for core subjects (eng, history, etc) Some courses expire after a period of time, so you'll need to check with the schools you are looking at. San Antonio has a wealth of nursing programs (ADN, BSN & even 1 diploma pgm), but acceptance is very competitive. Very high pre-req GPAs are the norm.

As for trying to "hurry up" - I know it's tempting, but take some time to see what students on this site are saying about the intensity of nursing education. There are some definite downsides to accelerated programs also especially for people without a healthcare background. One of the biggest would seem to be the fact that you cannot expect to work while enrolled in an accelerated pgm.

You seem like a great spouse! :yeah: Please keep on supporting her as she moves on into 'crazy land' (nursing education). She's going to need you more than ever.

I know many people who are pre-nursing and are going into the nursing because of the money. I guess their fantasy of nursing is not reflective of reality. This website has certainly open my eye too. At one time, I thought all nurses earned what my dad (90k) and granny (100k) make. I am so glad I did not let the money aspect influence my decision, because I forsee a lot of unhappily nurses; if people pursue nursing for the money. New grads make no were near 90k ( it would be nice though).

Since income seems to be an issue, be sure to thoroughly check out the local job market and general prevailing wages. You may have heard about some nurses pulling down over $100K/year but that doesn't mean that your wife can get, or would want, that kind of job. While most nurses make a good, solid wage and don't have to live paycheck to paycheck, most don't come anywhere near to $120K... even working overtime, nights and weekends. The majority of nursing jobs out there offer a structured wage ladder that eventually caps out.

Nursing administrator salaries are likely more open-ended, but then you are most definitely moving into "rat race" territory and away from actual nursing practice - politics, budget fights, committee meetings, etc. If administration is the direction your wife wants to head, she might also consider just start working towards to getting into that directly. There is coursework in health care administration and hospitals have departments of marketing, accounting, finance, etc. But I imagine that your wife is more likely looking for something completely different.

Some people like the idea of going straight on to become a nurse practitioner where there is more *potential* for higher salaries as well as avoiding the grind of understaffed, non-stop 12-hour shift work. In some areas, freshly-minted direct-entry NPs are snapped right up, but in other areas many end up right back at a bedside RN job due difficulty landing an NP job. NP pay & demand vary quite widely.

A lot of people aim for CRNA, which is known for high wages most places. However, that generally requires experience working in an ICU first as well as getting into one of the highly competitive programs and being in school another couple of years. Finally, if one makes it that far, the job is working with anesthetized patients - very little of the kind of patient interaction that many people go into nursing for in the first place.

Also note that clinical practice generally doesn't allow for dedicated lunch hours or running out for an errand in the afternoon. You may have to work on holidays or be called back to the hospital during your kid's baseball game. You may be busy non-stop for 12-straight hours, literally on your feet, putting out one 'fire' after another. You go home, try to rest and start again 12 hours later. Of course, in few jobs besides nursing can one work full-time by just going in 3 days a week. And with shift work, when you're off, you're off. Like anything, there are pros and cons and variation by employer and job. These are just things that office workers or others may not have considered prior to making a change to nursing.

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