LTC to TCU/Med surg

Posted

Specializes in LTC, Rehab. Has 2 years experience.

Hi all,

So I've been a nurse (LPN) at a LTC facility for about 9 months now. I love my job, but I have grown bored of it. I'm currently in RN school, and I know I'll need med surg experience sooner than later. My facility has a TCU, which is basically a med surg floor. I was wondering if I should ask to be transferred down there so I could get my experience.

There's a chance I wouldn't be able to come back to the LTC floor for awhile, because of COVID. However, I'm willing to take that chance. I want to expand my skills, and learn more for when I am an RN next year.

What are your guys's thoughts on this?

-Jared

Lynker, LPN

Specializes in LTC, Rehab. Has 2 years experience.

So, I realized I made a mistake. I think I would be transferring to a SNF/rehab unit. I applied to some jobs that are TCU/rehabs. Does anyone have any advice for me?

Sour Lemon

Has 11 years experience.

1 hour ago, JabuJabule said:

So, I realized I made a mistake. I think I would be transferring to a SNF/rehab unit. I applied to some jobs that are TCU/rehabs. Does anyone have any advice for me?

I'm not sure what TCU is, but rehab and med surg are totally different animals from what I've seen and experienced. At nine months in, you should find a lot to learn no matter where you work. I'm ten years in and still learning new things constantly.

Changing positions might make sense depending on your ultimate goals. Do keep in mind that employers also value a stable work history, though. An established employer might be more willing to work around your school schedule, too.

Lynker, LPN

Specializes in LTC, Rehab. Has 2 years experience.

Thank you for your reply!

if I did get another job, it would also be per diem and I’d still keep my LTC job.

I mostly do the night shift at my job, so it’s pretty quiet up until 5am, when I start passing early morning meds. I’m just craving to do more, though.

NotMyProblem MSN, ASN, BSN, MSN, LPN, RN

Specializes in Med/Surg, LTACH, LTC, Home Health. Has 35 years experience.

7 hours ago, Sour Lemon said:

I'm not sure what TCU is, but rehab and med surg are totally different animals from what I've seen and experienced.

I’m pretty sure you know what a TCU (Transitional Care Unit), but didn’t know that’s what it was called.😉 Some facilities use TCU and Swing Bed interchangeably. I’ve primarily encountered these at one-story, critical access hospitals, but did stumble across one as a float nurse at a level one trauma hospital.

They generally house patients who are stable enough to be discharged from acute care, but still need IV antibiotics and/or a combination of IV antibiotics and rehab.

For those patients progressing from this status, but social services is having difficulty finding placement due to lack of insurance, bed space in an LTC facility, and the patient is homeless, these patients become “swing bed” because other levels no longer apply, (or there is a bed coming up soon, but the medical team knows that if the patient is discharged to previous living situations to wait could be detrimental to the patient’s health and well-being.

Sour Lemon

Has 11 years experience.

6 hours ago, BSNbeDONE said:

I’m pretty sure you know what a TCU (Transitional Care Unit), but didn’t know that’s what it was called.😉 Some facilities use TCU and Swing Bed interchangeably. I’ve primarily encountered these at one-story, critical access hospitals, but did stumble across one as a float nurse at a level one trauma hospital.

They generally house patients who are stable enough to be discharged from acute care, but still need IV antibiotics and/or a combination of IV antibiotics and rehab.

For those patients progressing from this status, but social services is having difficulty finding placement due to lack of insurance, bed space in an LTC facility, and the patient is homeless, these patients become “swing bed” because other levels no longer apply, (or there is a bed coming up soon, but the medical team knows that if the patient is discharged to previous living situations to wait could be detrimental to the patient’s health and well-being.

I've never heard of a "swing bed" either, but I'm definitely familiar with that type of patient.

JBMmom, MSN, NP

Specializes in Long term care; med-surg; critical care. Has 9 years experience.

I went from LTC to med surg and kept my per diem LTC for about a year before I left. It's a good transition, I gained lots of experience in the LTC that helped me transition to acute care, but there was plenty more to learn. Good luck with finding your niche! It can take years, and that's the great thing about nursing, you can always move on to something else and pick up new skills.