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LPN program in a technical school?

LPN/LVN Students   (3,099 Views | 6 Replies)
by Ridge AB Ridge AB (New) New

705 Profile Views; 7 Posts

Hey everyone. I am soon going to apply for a LPN program in a local technical school. Is it any different than going to a college? My school nurse said going to a technical school is actually better than going to college for this program. Why do you think she said that? She really did not explain why. Pros and Cons compared to Tech school and College?

Replies appreciated!

~Ridge.

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garnetgirl29 is a BSN, RN and specializes in LTC, SNF, Rehab.

192 Posts; 7,914 Profile Views

I'm doing an LPN program at a community college & it costs roughly $5,000. It's 3 semesters long. Before choosing this program, I visited ECPI, and decided not to go there because that program was nearly $30,000. A classmate told me her husband did the medical assisting program at that school & they expect you not to work, but still make tuition payments while IN school. This is the only tech school I've had any experience with. I know an acquaintance who was a recruiter for ECPI & he told me that the program itself was good, but it was over priced and more students failed out than passed. They don't offer an RN program and most of their classes don't transfer to the universities, meaning it would be very difficult to further your degree. Definitely something to check out before making a decision. Check your state's Board of Nursing Website for info on approved schools, then do research to find out if the classes will be transferable. It really depends on the school you're considering. Since they are usually privately owned, there are a lot of variables. I plan to keep going for my BSN, so accreditation was very important to me. The community college I'm at offers the LPN program, an LPN-ADN bridge program and an ADN program. All 3 programs are fully accredited, so I'll have no issues transferring credits to the university when I start the ADN-BSN program. Good luck!

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Iridescent Orchid has 1 years experience as a CNA, LPN and specializes in CNA/LPN.

597 Posts; 8,996 Profile Views

[color=#2f4f4f]i am currently in the lpn program at a technical college with an estimated cost of $14,000, totaling for my entire time (including pre-reqs) which many will say is a lot cheaper than a lot of many other colleges in their area!

check with your school and see if they have any colleges who partake in the rn program in which your credits will transfer. i know that in my city, if your tech college is on semesters, usually, it is transferable, but definitely check the list of approved/accredited schools. also, check into the bridging offers. you may find that a college close to you participates in lpn-to-rn bridging, which usually only takes 1 year to go from lpn to rn, instead of transferring to a 4-year college after you graduate the lpn program.

also, it's been highly stressed, as i've watched seminars since i've gotten in the program, of my current and some of my future instructors talking with this high school seniors about the benefits of going lpn first. most rn programs focus more on theory and less on clinical time, whereas if you go lpn first, you'll get more clinical experience and become more comfortable/knowledgeable of clinical settings, as opposed to going straight into the rn program.

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Raviepoo specializes in hospice.

318 Posts; 8,864 Profile Views

In the LPN program I attended we learned A & P for LPNs, Phsych for LPNs, Human Development for LPNs, all watered down versions of the classes you must take to become an RN. This is fine if your goal is to be an LPN. If you want to become an RN later you will have to take some classes over again, in greater depth.

An accelerated LPN program is HARD. It will eat your life. You will have time for nothing else. At a community college you could be a part time student and have time for other things. It all depends on what your goals are. Do you want to become an LPN tomorrow or do you have other responsibilities to balance?

Just a word of advice - not all Vocational LPN schools are good schools. Do a little research before you decide which school to attend.

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freesia29 has 7 years experience as a LPN and specializes in Urgent Care.

261 Posts; 8,017 Profile Views

I have heard the same as Iridescent Orchid as well, and I also go to a tech college for LPN program that offers a bridge into the RN program.

I have heard from several people that LPN's do have more clinical time and practice than the 2 yr RN programs and one person even told me that we had more skills than a 4 year BSN student they knew who went to school in Seattle and had never practiced a pretty basic skill all her time in school, and it was an LPN in the hospital that had to show the BSN grad how to do it.

I go to Bellingham Technical College in Washington state.

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520 Posts; 10,321 Profile Views

I go to a technical college for my LPN, and it is just as tough as a bigger college. I have a friend going for her BSN at a large university here, and my classes for my LPN are pretty on par with a lot of her classes as far as the depth and knowledge. In my school, LPN's get a TON of clinical time. I mean, tons and tons. Lots of hands on, lots of skills testing, lots of lab hours, and after all that, lots and lots of clinicals. I find, at least at my technical college, you are prepared thoroughly for work as an LPN after graduation. I also like that my technical college has an NCLEX pass rate of 100% for 6 years running.

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