Getting into an LPN program

  1. Does anyone know if it's quicker to get into an LPN program vs an RN - generally speaking, of course?

    I'm working as a phlebotomist and am axiously awaiting my national certification test. I am also studying for the CNA test in our state. My plan is to become a CNA and begin working in that capacity while taking pre-reqs to get into nursing. But, there's a 1 1/2 year wait! Perhaps it would be quicker for me if I entered the LPN program and then bridged afterward?

    Any thoughts?
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    Joined: Aug '06; Posts: 2

    4 Comments

  3. by   L&D_2b
    Quote from punktot
    Does anyone know if it's quicker to get into an LPN program vs an RN - generally speaking, of course?

    I'm working as a phlebotomist and am axiously awaiting my national certification test. I am also studying for the CNA test in our state. My plan is to become a CNA and begin working in that capacity while taking pre-reqs to get into nursing. But, there's a 1 1/2 year wait! Perhaps it would be quicker for me if I entered the LPN program and then bridged afterward?

    Any thoughts?
    Where I live (in western PA) it is quicker. The RN programs are usually real competitive, thus the waiting list can be two or three years long to get in. The LPN programs are not as competitive, but fill up fast too. It is more like "just wait until the next class that begins with an available seat". I chose the LPN route because of this. I don't want to sit "idle" for a couple of years. I would rather do an LPN to RN bridge program after I'm done with LPN school (those usually don't have any wait lists).
    Good luck!
  4. by   lilypad2424
    In Houston, I found that it is less competitive and much quicker to get into an LVN program. I initially began taking classes to enter an RN program, and learned that I could go the LPN route first and then bridge to RN.
  5. by   TheCommuter
    I attended an expensive LVN program in California with no waiting lists. LPN/LVN programs are competetive, but not nearly as fiercely competetive as the RN programs.
  6. by   Bala Shark
    In California, there are a lot of LVN private schools..You can get in if you can pay for it and I think that is it..For community colleges, I guess you can say it is more difficult plus you have to take the required classes before applying in the first place..

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