Loss of Leadership

Updated | Posted

Has 16 years experience.

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A large corporation took over our hospital a few years ago. The CNO that was brought in on contract for the transition drove out half of the directors and most of the unit managers.

The same thing happened with another CNO at another hospital in our "region". There has been some reorganization of roles, but mainly we have empty management positions. Big bonuses to sign on, if anyone is interested. 

The pipeline for training managers from the staff never really existed. It is rural area. Where will new managers come from?

The consultant CNOs completely blew up what existed and have gone on to be promoted. The replacement structure isn't working or isn't obviously working?

Some of the travel contract managers live in another state and will be out of the office and working from the home state for a week each month. Some of the new hire leadership are only in our town for about 4 days a week and go "home" to somewhere not here for the rest of the work week. Seems like the jobs they have taken on are for resume padding? They are clearly not invested enough in us to move here. 

When the directors and mangers are in the building, they are in meetings most of the time. The meetings are Skype or zoom or whatever? Do they want to be in meetings? Or is it just convenient to be in meetings? Our manager runs in and smiles and waves and runs out before anyone can respond to her "How is everything?"

Anyone else seeing a loss of leadership? Is this part of the job turnover that is being spoken of? Or is the golden age of nurse management over, and as the leadership retires there is no one to step up? Either because no one has the skill set and/or the interest in the roles?

11 hours ago, SunDazed said:

The CNO that was brought in on contract for the transition drove out half of the directors and most of the unit managers.

By design.

Don't waste your life caring about ANY of this. Your concerns are not their concerns and their goals are not yours. The best advice for the general situation you describe, IMHO, is to leave.

I can tell from your post that you're still in the phase of thinking that people care about the things you do and that the situation you mention is a problem. And that it can be fixed with actions such as caring, problem-solving, common sense and rational thought. You are wrong.

Consider yourself warned. 😢

Tweety, BSN, RN

Specializes in Med-Surg, Trauma, Ortho, Neuro, Cardiac. Has 29 years experience.

That doesn't sound like a good situation.

I don't think it's entirely uncommon for management to be replaced or quit when new owners come along.  We had a buy out a year ago and they did away with an entire level of management.  They laid off the directors who used to be in above the managers and below the CNO.    

They left the floor managers intact but changed a bit how they do things.  One manager didn't adjust and quit.  Being a Nurse Manager is a tough job because you get pressure from above to meet certain goals, and you get pressure from the nurse staff how hard our jobs are.  They are on call 24/7 and put in long hours.  It's a hard job to fill.  I've been offered the job many times over the years but seeing what they go through and what staff puts them through, no thanks.  

Under new owners things change but I don't necessarily agree with the person above that you should quit.   If your particular job description isn't changed all that to create personal hardship under the new ownership and lack of management, I would tough it out and see how it goes.  My job was tough and demanding before we were bought out and it remains so now. I like our new owners better though.

Daisy4RN

Specializes in Travel, Home Health, Med-Surg. Has 20 years experience.

On 11/22/2021 at 4:37 PM, SunDazed said:

Anyone else seeing a loss of leadership? Is this part of the job turnover that is being spoken of? Or is the golden age of nurse management over, and as the leadership retires there is no one to step up? Either because no one has the skill set and/or the interest in the roles?

The loss of leadership has been happening for quite a while. When hospitals started using MBAs and money became the bottom line most good managers were either pushed out or quit bc of the demands from upper management. I knew a few good managers who just got tired of fighting (for staff and pts) and stepped down from management. Then upper management puts people in place with little to no experience/skills just bc they are Yes people. This is definitely not new. 

SunDazed, BSN, RN

Has 16 years experience.

15 hours ago, JKL33 said:

By design.

Don't waste your life caring about ANY of this. Your concerns are not their concerns and their goals are not yours. The best advice for the general situation you describe, IMHO, is to leave.

I can tell from your post that you're still in the phase of thinking that people care about the things you do and that the situation you mention is a problem. And that it can be fixed with actions such as caring, problem-solving, common sense and rational thought. You are wrong.

Consider yourself warned. 😢

You are right. I do still care. I am in some stage of grieving. Grieving the loss of someone in leadership representing staff in the decision making.